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G8 Calls For Swift End To Regional Conflicts


http://gdb.rferl.org/F897031B-CE5B-4B05-9917-C8D0160FC39B_w203.jpg --> http://gdb.rferl.org/F897031B-CE5B-4B05-9917-C8D0160FC39B_mw800_mh600.jpg Armenian President Robert Kocharian (left) with his Azerbaijani counterpart, İlham Aliyev (file photo) (Photolur) June 29, 2006 -- Foreign ministers from the Group of Eight leading industrialized nations have called for a prompt resolution to regional conflicts in former Soviet republics and in the Balkans.


In a statement after a meeting in Moscow, the ministers called on Azerbaijan and Armenia to show the political will needed to reach an agreement this year over Nagorno-Karabakh.


They also welcomed the launch of direct talks on Kosovo and urged a negotiated agreement.


(AP)

The Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict

Click on the image to view an enlarged map of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict zone

In February 1988, the local assembly in Stepanakert, the local capital of the Azerbaijani region of NAGORNO-KARABAKH, passed a resolution calling for unification of the predominantly ethnic-Armenian region with Armenia. There were reports of violence against local Azeris, followed by attacks against Armenians in the Azerbaijani city of Sumgait. In 1991-92, Azerbaijani forces launched an offensive against separatist forces in Nagorno-Karabakh, but the Armenians counterattacked and by 1993-94 had seized almost all of the region, as well as vast areas around it. About 600,000 Azeris were displaced and as many as 25,000 people were killed before a Russian-brokered cease-fire was imposed in May 1994.

CHRONOLOGY: For an annotated timeline of the fighting around Nagorno-Karabakh in 1988-94 and the long search for a permanent settlement to the conflict, click here.

Click on the icon to view images of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict (Flash required)

To view an archive of all of RFE/RL's coverage of Nagorno-Karabakh, click here.
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