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(RFE/RL) March 2, 2007 -- South Korea says it plans to resume limited food aid to North Korea following four days of talks in Seoul.

South Korea says it will provide rice and fertilizer to the North, but the aid will be contingent on Pyongyang honoring last month's multinational agreement to shut down its main nuclear reactor within 60 days.

Meanwhile, U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte, speaking in Tokyo today, said North Korea will have to take substantial steps before Washington considers lifting sanctions and removing Pyongyang from its list of nations sponsoring terrorism.

(AP, AFP)
The Proliferation Threat

The Arak heavy-water plant in central Iran (Fars)

BENDING THE RULES. Henry Sokolski, executive director of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center, told an RFE/RL-Radio Free Asia briefing on January 9 that the West is hamstrung in dealing with Iran and North Korea because of the way it has interpreted the international nonproliferation regime to benefit friendly countries like India and Japan.


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