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150 Years Of The London 'Tube'

On January 9, 1863, the world's first underground rail journey took place between London's Paddington and Farringdon stations on the Metropolitan Railway. Within its first few months, the pioneering subway system was carrying 26,000 passengers a day. Today, that number tops 3.5 million. The London Underground, known as "The Tube," now serves 270 stations and covers 402 kilometers of track, 45 percent of which is below ground. Here is a short photographic history of the London Underground. (23 PHOTOS)

The London Underground's iconic sign appears in front of the Big Ben clock tower in central London.
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The London Underground's iconic sign appears in front of the Big Ben clock tower in central London.

A young visitor to the London Transport Museum runs in front of an old Underground map.
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A young visitor to the London Transport Museum runs in front of an old Underground map.

In this undated photo, workers extend the rail line using "cut and cover" construction, digging deep below the surface of London's Praed Street.
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In this undated photo, workers extend the rail line using "cut and cover" construction, digging deep below the surface of London's Praed Street.

Workers on London’s Central Line during the construction of the British Museum Station in 1898. The station is no longer in use.
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Workers on London’s Central Line during the construction of the British Museum Station in 1898. The station is no longer in use.

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