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Ahmadinejademan on geopolitics and the country's trail-blazing president:

I remember when everyone, during the last presidential election, said that Mahmud Ahmadinejad has a very academic personality and is only capable of dealing with the internal affairs of the country. "He's not a politician," they said.

And now we see that he is a real politician, and in my view Iran has never seen such a politician.

I know the critics might immediately say, "What is it that he has done? Have the sanctions on Iran been lifted, or are we now really close allies of America and Israel?"

My answer would be: When do we come to our senses? Have America or any other superpowers of this world ever considered us to be of [sufficient] importance to become our allies? Throughout the 2,500-year history of Iran, have countries like America, Britain, Germany, France, Spain...ever considered Iran their equal and become allies with us?

The diplomacy of this world is like a wild jungle in which one gets devoured if he is not independent or powerful enough. All the superpowers of this world who seem to get along with one another are simply allies out of fear of war with each other.

Wasn't it [reformist ex-President Mohammad] Khatami who on numerous occasions visited European countries and propagated dialogue between civilizations? According to him, the dialogue between civilizations became global. But what was the outcome? Iran was introduced as part of the axis of evil during Khatami's [administration].

Wasn't it during his [administration] that Iran backed off its own right to nuclear energy? What was the outcome?

Iran was humiliated to the extent that America asked Iran to halt its nuclear program and, in return, they would send an Internet tutor to Iran!!!

Those are all the facts of which some of you and I are aware...

About This Blog

Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.

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