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Editor Of Ultraconservative 'Kayhan' Daily A Role Model

Haj Hossein Shariatmadari

Haj Hossein Shariatmadari

Mehdinews tracks some bad blood between an influential editor and a presidential candidate:

I had announced on this very blog that I consider ["Kayhan" Editor in Chief] Haj Hossein Shariatmadari as a role model when it comes to political issues. I adore the way he has been a true follower of the principles of the Imam (Editor's note: a reference to Ayatollah Khomeini, founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran) and the revolution.

He is the only one who stood up to the propaganda of the so-called broad-minded and Westernized individuals during the eight years of mischievous and profligate rule that came along with pompous slogans like "political development" and "civil society." Using his enlightening articles, he was able to crush all the plans of the enemies of Iran and Islam. His services to the revolution during the eight-year presidential term of Seyed Mohammad Khatami's are incomparable to any other figure.

If you have been following the political developments of recent days, you might be aware of the dispute between Haj Hossein Shariatmadari and [reformist candidate and former parliament speaker] Mehdi Karrubi. It began when Karrubi's press organ [the "Etemade Melli" newspaper] dedicated its front-page story to Karrubi condemning the executions of those who [committed their offenses when they were] under 18 in Iran.

In his declaration, Karrubi used a very unique approach that is known to be the specialty of the Los Angeles-based Iranian opposition members. He emphasized that the under-18 executions in the Islamic Republic are taking place now more than ever. That declaration was welcomed by the counterrevolutionary media. [...] After that, "Kayhan" published a satirical article and criticized Karrubi's comments.

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Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.