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Iran's Supreme Leader Tweets About Women's Rights

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei

Here is a tweet by Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei (yes, he's on Twitter, he joined Twitter long before the Dalai Lama) on his views about women and their role in society. It came on March 9, the day after International Women's Day.

khamenei_ir The Supreme Leader's View of Women's Role and Rights in Society


"Women's activities in society are completely appropriate and acceptable. They should be active in society by observing Islamic limits."

"The issue of hijab is not intended to isolate women. Those who have such a perception of hijab are mistaken. The purpose of hijab is to prevent men and women from interacting with each other without observing any boundaries. Such an interaction would be detrimental to society and both men and women -- particularly women. Hijab helps women reach the lofty moral position they deserve and prevents them from moral deviation."

"In places where women are encouraged to ignore hijab and immodest clothes are encouraged, women's security will be undermined in the first place. Then the security of men and youth will be undermined too. Islam has introduced the issue of hijab to help men and women carry out their duties in society."

"Of course the issue of employment is not of primary importance for women. Although Islam is not opposed to the employment of women -- except in specific cases, which may or may not be agreed upon by all Islamic jurisprudents. The main issue regarding women is what has now been completely destroyed in the West, that is, the feeling of peace and security and having an opportunity to show their talents without being oppressed in society, in the family, or by their husbands and fathers."

About This Blog

Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.


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