Accessibility links

RFE/RL correspondent Daisy Sindelar and multimedia producer Margot Buff have been exploring Mongolia for a week. -- Eds.

The style is pure Soviet agitprop. But the message is something new.

In 2003, Mongolian high-school students were invited to submit poster designs for an anti-corruption campaign.

Here are a few of the entries:

"Let's make a decisive fight against corruption."

"If you've got the money..."

Who's stronger? The state, or ..."

"Corruption, bribery -- Issues of national security"

Corruption continues to bedevil Mongolia’s political evolution.

Allegations of voter fraud in last year’s parliamentary elections led to the torching of the former-Communist MPRP party headquarters; five people were killed in the riots.

And although most Mongolians describe themselves as “fairly satisfied” with their government, they also list continued corruption as one of its greatest failures, and say “support for the rich” is the policy that best characterizes the current leadership.

Forty percent of the country’s population currently lives on less than a dollar a day.

-- Daisy Sindelar

About This Blog

Written by RFE/RL editors and correspondents, Transmission serves up news, comment, and the odd silly dictator story. While our primary concern is with foreign policy, Transmission is also a place for the ideas -- some serious, some irreverent -- that bubble up from our bureaus. The name recognizes RFE/RL's role as a surrogate broadcaster to places without free media. You can write us at