Accessibility links

Russia Rejects U.S. Missile Proposals


MOSCOW (Reuters) -- The Kremlin has rejected U.S. proposals aimed at easing concerns over a missile-defense system in Europe and said it would try again to resolve the row once Barack Obama is in the White House.

Russia says the planned U.S. system will threaten its national security and that the administration of George W. Bush, which leaves office in January, has failed to allay its concerns.

"Russia is ready to cooperate with the United States on European security but considers the proposals that were sent are insufficient," the ITAR-TASS news agency quoted an unidentified Kremlin source as saying.

"We will not give our agreement to these proposals and we will speak to the new administration," said the source, who was quoted by Russia's three main news agencies, an indication the remarks reflect official policy. The Kremlin press office declined to comment.

The Bush administration "is intent on putting the new U.S. president in a hopeless situation, so that he should take responsibility for what they concocted without him," TASS quoted the source as saying.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said last week he planned to deploy missile systems near Poland's border in retaliation for U.S. plans to install elements of the proposed missile-defense system in Poland and the Czech Republic.
XS
SM
MD
LG