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Obama Says Alleged Russian Hack Wouldn't Change Relations

  • RFE/RL

WASHINGTON -- U.S. President Barack Obama said the alleged Russian hack of Democratic Party computers, if confirmed, would not dramatically change already troubled relations between the two countries.

Obama’s comments on August 2 came as the FBI continued to probe the hack, which occurred in June.

Thousands of internal e-mails from the Democratic Party Committee were later leaked, embarrassing the party at the start of its convention to nominate Hillary Clinton as its presidential candidate.

Clinton has blamed Russia for the hack. The Kremlin has denied involvement.

Speaking at the White House, Obama said "the United States already has a lot of differences with Russia on a whole bunch of issues, but I think that we've been able to try to stay focused on those areas where we still have a common interest."

"If, in fact, Russia engaged in this activity, it's just one on a long list of issues that me and Mr. Putin talk about and that I've got a real problem with," he added.

Meanwhile, three more top Democratic Party officials resigned on August 2 amid a shake-up following the release of the e-mails, some of which indicated Democratic Party chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz and other officials favored Clinton over rival Bernie Sanders during the primary campaign.

Wasserman Schultz resigned last week.

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