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Russia's Amur Tiger Numbers On The Rise

  • RFE/RL

In the 1940s, the largest cat in the world was on the brink of extinction with no more than a few dozen in the wild.

In the 1940s, the largest cat in the world was on the brink of extinction with no more than a few dozen in the wild.

According to interim census results, the population of the Amur tiger in Russia has increased to as many as 540 individuals.

Reacting to the figures released by the Russian government, WWF-Russia head Igor Chestin said on May 27, "This success is due to the commitment of Russia's political leadership and the tireless dedication of rangers and conservationists in very difficult conditions."

WWF says antipoaching efforts have been integral to the rise in tiger numbers, with tougher punishments and the introduction of criminal charges for the illegal hunting, storage, and trafficking of endangered animals and their parts.

Russia's Far East is home to 95 percent of the world's population of Amur tigers, also known as Siberian tigers.

In the 1940s, the largest cat in the world was on the brink of extinction with no more than a few dozen in the wild.

The last census in 2005 showed there were up to 502 individuals.

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