Accessibility links

Russian Floodwaters Continue To Rise Near Khabarovsk


The water level in some regions of the Far East began to recede over the weekend, but the situation in the cities of Khabarovsk and Komsomolsk-na-Amure remains serious as the water level continues to rise.

The water level in some regions of the Far East began to recede over the weekend, but the situation in the cities of Khabarovsk and Komsomolsk-na-Amure remains serious as the water level continues to rise.

The level of the Amur River near the city of Khabarovsk in Russia's Far East has reached a record high of 800 centimeters as devastating floods continue in the area.

The normal level of the river near Khabarovsk in August and September is 210 centimeters.

Russia's Emergency Situations Ministry said on September 2 that more than 27,500 residents had been evacuated from 115 towns and villages in the regions of Amur, Khabarovsk, and the Jewish Autonomous Oblast.

The water level in some regions of the Far East began to recede over the weekend, but the situation in the cities of Khabarovsk and Komsomolsk-na-Amure remains serious as the water level continues to rise.

President Vladimir Putin visited the flood-affected regions late last week and signed a decree outlining compensation and flood-relief efforts.

He also replaced his envoy to the Far East, Viktor Ishayev.

The floods, which are considered Russia's worst in 120 years, were caused by heavy rains.

Based on reporting by ITAR-TASS and Interfax
XS
SM
MD
LG