Friday, July 25, 2014


Russia

Bulgaria, Russia's Gazprom Agree On Gas Deal

<div class="caption"><div class="watermark"> <a href="http://gdb.rferl.org/CB4EB314-DA66-4EDE-BB53-B120A93E259F_mw800_mh600.jpg" rel="ibox" title="Bulgarian Prime Minister Stgei Stanishev (right) with Gazprom CEO Aleksei Miller in Sofia today (epa)"> <img alt="Bulgarian Prime Minister Stgei Stanishev (right) with Gazprom CEO Aleksei Miller in Sofia today (epa)" src="http://gdb.rferl.org/CB4EB314-DA66-4EDE-BB53-B120A93E259F_w203.jpg" class="photo" border="0"></a></div><p>Bulgarian Prime Minister Stgei Stanishev (right) with Gazprom CEO Aleksei Miller in Sofia today (epa)</p></div>December 18, 2006 -- Bulgaria has agreed with Russia's state-controlled monopoly Gazprom to gradually increase the price it pays for Russian gas to market prices in 2012.


The two sides also signed a deal guaranteeing gas deliveries and gas transit through Bulgaria to southeast Europe until 2030.


The deal ends the current practice, under which Gazprom paid with cheaper gas for transit.


(ITAR-TASS, mediapool.bg)

How Much Do The Neighbors Pay?

SETTING THE RATES: With Gazprom negotiating new contracts, many states will be paying more for Russian natural gas in 2007.

  • Belarus, following tense negotiations with Gazprom, will pay $100 per 1,000 cubic meters in -- up from $47 in 2006. 
  • Ukraine, which depends on Russia to supply it with about 77 percent of its gas, will pay $130 per 1,000 cubic meters of a Turkmen-Russian gas mix.
  • Moldova, which depends on Russia for 100 percent of its gas, will pay $170 per 1,000 cubic meters, with the price rising to European-level market price by 2011.
  • Georgia has agreed to pay Gazprom $235 per 1,000 cubic meters of gas.



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