Monday, September 01, 2014


Pakistan

Pakistani Taliban Back More Talks, But No Cease-Fire

Pakistanis attend a "peace walk" in the city of Lahore last month, after representatives of Pakistan and the Taliban met for the first time since the government suspended the peace process over the killing of 23 soldiers by the rebels.
Pakistanis attend a "peace walk" in the city of Lahore last month, after representatives of Pakistan and the Taliban met for the first time since the government suspended the peace process over the killing of 23 soldiers by the rebels.

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The Pakistani Taliban says it wants to continue peace negotiations with the government – but the militants will not extend a cease-fire.

The Tehrik-e Taliban Pakistan (TTP) said on April 16 that the government had not responded adequately to its demands, and that the militants will therefore not be extending their 40-day cease-fire.

However, a statement said the group is prepared to continue talks with "complete sincerity and seriousness."

It said that when the government responds clearly, the Taliban will not hesitate to respond seriously. 

No comment on whether talks would continue was immediately available from the Pakistani government.

The TTP announced a one-month cease-fire at the start of March, and later extended it for 10 days. It expired on April 10.

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's government opened negotiations with the TTP in a bid to end the militant insurgency, which began in December 2007 and has claimed the lives of thousands of people.
 
Based on reporting by AFP, Thenews.com.pk, and Tribune.com.pk

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