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World's Oldest Man, Who Fought Bolsheviks In 1918, Dies At Age 111

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A Polish-born man recognized as the world's oldest has died in New York City at the age of 111 years.

Alexander Imich, who fled the Soviet Union and came to the United States in 1952, died peacefully at a retirement home on June 8.

Born in 1903 in Czestochowa -- which was then part of Russia -- he joined Polish forces and fought against the Bolsheviks in 1918.

Imich and his wife were interned in a labor camp during World War II for refusing to take Soviet citizenship.

A trained chemist who later became a paranormal expert, Imich credited his long life to having been active in sports, not having children, and not drinking alcohol.

While Imich was the world's oldest man, there are dozens of older women, with Japanese Misao Okawa the world's oldest person at age 116.

Japan's Sakari Momoi, 111, is now the world's oldest man, having been born one day after Imich.

 
Based on reporting by "New York Daily News" and "Time"

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