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Tuesday, September 02, 2014


Kazakhstan

  • A horned sphinx from a coffin shroud, late 4th–early 3rd century B.C. (Presidential Center of Culture, Astana)
  • A plaque of a perched raptor or vulture, 8th–7th century B.C. (Central State Museum, Almaty)
  • The plaque of a standing argali mountain sheep, 8th–7th century B.C. (Central State Museum, Almaty)
  • A “snow leopard mask” consisting of two facing ibex heads and a flying bird, 8th–7th century B.C. (Central State Museum, Almaty)
  • Embroidery of a winged bull from saddle cloth, (late 4th–early 3rd century B.C.) (A. Kh. Margulan Institute of Archaeology, Almaty)
  • A U-shaped element with a scale pattern from a bridle throat latch horn, late 4th–early 3rd century B.C. (A. Kh. Margulan Institute of Archaeology, Almaty)
  • A plaque of facing elk-griffin heads, late 4th–early 3rd century B.C. (A. Kh. Margulan Institute of Archaeology, Almaty)
  • A cauldron adornment (protome) featuring winged ibexes, 5th–3rd century B.C. (Central State Museum, Almaty)
  • Horned deer with folded legs, 7th–6th century B.C. (Presidential Center of Culture, Astana)
  • A feline face and stylized ornaments from horse tack, late 4th–early 3rd century B.C. (Presidential Center of Culture, Astana)
  • A round tray on a conical stand with figures of a seated man and a standing horse in the center, 5th–3rd century B.C. (Central State Museum, Almaty)

Kazakhstan's Ancient Nomadic Culture

Published 8 April 2012

An exhibition of ancient objects from eastern Kazakhstan is opening eyes to the complexity of the country's traditional nomadic lifestyle. The installation at a New York institute, which has been two years in the making, features more than 250 objects from the first millennium BC. From elaborate gold pieces, to saddles preserved in permafrost, to massive cooking pots for feasting, the exhibit dispels the misconception that nomadic pastoral life was in any way unsophisticated.