Wednesday, November 26, 2014


Matthew Shepard, a gay man, was killed in 1998 in Wyoming. His parents have become LGBT activists and traveled to Russia.

Matthew Shepard’s Parents Take LGBT Tolerance Message To Russia

The parents of a gay American student whose 1998 murder helped inspire federal U.S. hate-crimes legislation traveled to Russia this week for screenings of a documentary about their son’s tragic life and the struggle for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights. More

A memorial to the victims of Soviet-era political repressions in the southern Russian city of Stavropol.

'Last Address' Project Aims To Honor Victims Of Soviet Repression

A citizen-funded commemorative project run by liberal journalists is aiming to install memorial plaques across the country in honor victims of Soviet repression. More

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Grigory Karasin (file photo)

Russia Defends Abkhazia Pact

Russia has rejected accusations that it is planning to annex Georgia's breakaway regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. More

Rezagul says her daughter, daughter-in-law, and youngest son also joined her in fending off the assault.

Grieving Afghan Mother 'Kills 10 Taliban In Revenge'

An Afghan mother says she grabbed a gun and hand grenades to help policemen fend off a Taliban assault that killed her son. Authorities say 27 militants were killed in the operation. More

Russian businessman Sergei Kolesnikov fled Russia in 2010 after publishing an open letter to then-President Dmitry Medvedev revealing the construction of a lavish Black Sea palace commissioned by Putin and funded with a billion dollars in illegally diverted funds.

Kremlin Whistle-Blower: 'Putin Has No Option But To Stay In Power'

Sergei Kolesnikov, a former ally of Vladimir Putin now living in self-imposed exile, says the Russian leader will go to any lengths to stay in power and avoid criminal prosecution. In an undisclosed location, Kolesnikov spoke to RFE/RL about Kremlin corruption, the war in Ukraine, and whether Putin will play the nuclear card. More


Recent Features

With Hagel Out, Past Contenders Eyed As Next U.S. Defense Chief

U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel’s abrupt announcement of his resignation on November 24 leaves a top cabinet position open in U.S. President Barack Obama’s administration, and early speculation suggests that candidates previously considered for the job could be tapped to lead the Pentagon.
More

Kazakh Historians Campaign To Save Infamous Tsarist, Soviet Prison

Crumbling ruins are all that remain of a Kazakh prison with an inglorious past as a center of tsarist and Soviet repression -- leaving local historians scrambling to preserve its legacy.
More

'They Want To Frighten People' -- Donetsk Native Recalls Captivity In Rebel-Held City

Donetsk native Svitlana Matushko spent seven days in the basement of the former Ukrainian secret services building in the eastern Ukrainian city. She tells how the separatist authorities there are using terror to push out all those who oppose their agenda.
More

Obama Faces Tough Crowd At Home On Iran Nuclear Deal

As a deadline approaches for world powers to strike a deal with Iran over its nuclear program, U.S. President Barack Obama faces a challenge getting it through -- or past -- a wary Congress.
More

Children-404: LGBT Support Group In Kremlin's Crosshairs

Since 2013, the support group Children-404 has been providing an online safe haven for gay Russian teens to discuss their hopes and fears. And now the authorities want to put a stop to that.
More

In Releasing Seselj, ICTY Solves One Problem -- But Creates Many Others

When The Hague tribunal opted this month to provisionally release war crimes suspect Vojislav Seselj to seek cancer treatment in Serbia, it was attempting to amend one of the longest, most mismanaged cases ever to come before the court. But sending the fiery Seslj home may be the start of a whole new type of trouble, for the Balkans and the tribunal alike.
More

Two Futures: With An Iran Nuclear Deal, And Without

The world could look very different depending on the success or failure of the Iran nuclear talks.
More

Video Why Does Turkey's President Think Muslims Discovered America?

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is no stranger to controversy but even many seasoned Turkey watchers were taken aback when he boldly claimed that "Muslims discovered America in 1178, not Christopher Columbus."
More

Video Faces Of The Maidan: Where Are They Now?

One year after the beginning of the Maidan protest movement that changed the course of Ukraine's history, RFE/RL went back to talk to some of the memorable people who were heavily involved in those tumultuous events.
More

Video Russian Oysters? Foie Gras? Not A Problem, Say Farmers In Sanctions-Hit Russia

Initiatives are cropping up across Russia to replace Western food products banned by Moscow. But consumers are already feeling the sting of sanctions.
More
More Features

Most Popular Articles