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A still image from CCTV footage published by Life.Ru allegedly shows Aleksei Navalny at the penal colony in the town of Pokrov, Russia.

Jailed Russian opposition leader Aleksei Navalny said on April 16 that prison authorities have threatened to put him in a straitjacket to force-feed him unless he halts his hunger strike.

Navalny, 44, announced a hunger strike at the end of last month in protest at what he said was the refusal of prison authorities to allow him to receive proper medical care for acute back and leg pain.

In an Instagram post, Navalny said an official told him that blood tests showed his health was deteriorating and threatened to force-feed him if he continues his hunger strike.

“And then she detailed the joys of force-feeding to me. Straitjacket and other pleasures,” the politician said, adding that he urged the officials not to do it, “pointing to a clause in the law.”

Navalny did not elaborate on what he meant by "other pleasures."

Navalny was arrested in January on his arrival from Germany where he was treated for poisoning in Siberia with what was defined by European labs as a nerve agent in August last year. He has accused President Vladimir Putin of ordering the poisoning, which the Kremlin has denied.

A Moscow court sentenced the opposition leader in February to 2 1/2 years in prison on charges he says were politically motivated.

Based on reporting by Reuters and AP
Navalny’s Anti-Corruption Foundation (FBK) exposes state corruption and his network of regional offices organizes political activities, including efforts to counter the Kremlin-controlled United Russia party in regional and local elections.

Russian prosecutors have asked a Moscow court to label jailed Kremlin critic Aleksei Navalny’s anti-corruption organization and its regional offices as "extremist" organizations.

"Under the guise of liberal slogans, these organizations are engaged in creating conditions for the destabilization of the social and sociopolitical situation," the Moscow prosecutor's office said in a statement on April 16.

It accused Russia’s largest opposition network of working to create conditions for “changing the foundations of the constitutional order.”

The extremist label, if approved, would severely limit Navalny’s allies and activists from organizing, criminalizing such things as calling for or participating in protests. Navalny's aides and organizations are already subject to frequent police raids and arrests over their political activities.

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Navalny’s Anti-Corruption Foundation (FBK) exposes state corruption and his network of regional offices organizes political activities, including efforts to counter the Kremlin-controlled United Russia party in regional and local elections.

The latest move against Navalny’s opposition movement comes as his aides are pushing for massive nationwide protests in the coming weeks.

Navalny was sentenced in February to 2 1/2 years in prison on charges he says were politically motivated. He was arrested in January after returning from Germany, where he was treated for the poison attack that European laboratories said involved a chemical nerve agent from the Novichok group.

His arrest in January triggered some of the largest nationwide protests in years and a harsh crackdown.

Navalny, 44, announced a hunger strike at the end of last month in protest at what he said was the refusal of prison authorities to allow him to receive proper medical care for acute back and leg pain.

With reporting by AFP, Current Time, and Reuters

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