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St-behesht questions the pledges of reformist candidate Musavi, as well as the principles of his sympathizers:

The atmosphere is filled with the essence of the election and the candidates are eager to take full advantage of it.

One of those candidates is Mir Hossein Musavi. His campaign is creating hype like he's the definite winner of the elections.

It is saddening that a bunch of emotional and pampered teenagers with their perceptual freedom as their only concern have been sent out into the streets so they can rush around with Musavi campaign posters in the luxurious cars that their fathers have paid for.

Is their idea of freedom being able to walk on the streets openly holding the hands of their girls while no policeman can badger them?! Is this real freedom?! If this is true freedom, then we can see that it is spread all across countries like China, Russia, Cuba, and even North Korea. In those countries, boys and girls can freely hold hands together and roam around while nothing like a police officer bugs them.

Poor [jailed] activists like [women's rights campaigner] Jelveh Javaheri and [student activist] Javid Tehrani. It is really strange for me to see people who consider Musavi a candidate who seeks improvement for the country, while no one has ever witnessed any such action from his side in the past. All that has been seen are promises, and we have seen promises before; all those candidates who have promised this and that but after manipulating the trust of the nation and gaining the votes, all of them forget their pledges.

[Experience] shows that none of the unrealistic pledges of Musavi would be brought into practice. He has even promised things that are outside the prerogatives of the president of the Islamic Republic.

It reminded me of the campaign promises of [former reformist President Mohammad Khatami], who promised freedom of thought; but how unfortunate that we not only lost our freedom but also lost our lives. Interestingly, he had the government, parliament, and the city council under control -- but none of his promises became true.

Now the pledges of Mir Hossein Musavi seem to be unattainable while our duped, naive teens are driving the streets with his campaign posters on their cars. How unfortunate these teens are, and how unfortunate is our nation...

About This Blog

Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.


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