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Egyptian Court Acquits Policemen Of 2011 Killings


The case concerned the the killing of antigovernment protesters outside police stations in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria in 2011. (file photo)

The case concerned the the killing of antigovernment protesters outside police stations in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria in 2011. (file photo)

An Egyptian court has acquitted six police officers of killing 83 protesters during the 2011 uprising against Hosni Mubarak.

The police officers' cases involved the killing of protesters outside police stations in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria.

Prosecutors said that commanders armed police with live ammunition and allowed officers to shoot at protesters.

Defense lawyers denied the policemen were responsible for the killings.

Nearly 850 people died during the 18-day uprising that toppled Mubarak.

More than a dozen policemen were put on trial, but most have been acquitted.

The ruling on February 22 came as a Cairo court resumed the trial of Mohammed Morsi, Mubarak's now deposed Islamist successor.

Morsi and 130 co-defendants are being tried for organizing jailbreaks and attacking police stations during the uprising.

Morsi faces a host of other charges.


Based on reporting by AFP and AP
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