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Iran Says Extension Of Sanctions Act By U.S. Congress Violates Nuclear Deal


Officials in President Barack Obama's administration say they've determined that the legislation does not violate the agreement that curbed Iran's controversial nuclear program -- satisfying a key condition the president had established for his approval.

Officials in President Barack Obama's administration say they've determined that the legislation does not violate the agreement that curbed Iran's controversial nuclear program -- satisfying a key condition the president had established for his approval.

Iran says the extension of sanctions legislation by the U.S. Congress is "a violation" of the nuclear deal reached between Tehran and world powers last year.

"We will report it to Iran's committee assigned for monitoring the implementation of the deal," Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi said on December 2.

"We are ready to firmly protect the nation's rights under any circumstances," Ghasemi added.

The statement comes after the U.S. Senate unanimously approved legislation on December 1 to renew the Iran Sanctions Act for 10 more years.

The House of Representatives has already passed the bill to extend the decades-old law allowing the United States to impose sanctions on companies for doing business with Iran.

The bill now goes to the White House, where U.S. President Barack Obama is expected to sign it.

Officials in Obama's administration say they've determined that the legislation does not violate the agreement that curbed Iran's controversial nuclear program -- satisfying a key condition the president had established for his approval.

Based on reporting by Reuters and AP
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