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Stalin's Gulag As 'Ivan Denisovich' Would Have Seen It

It's been 50 years since the publication in 1962 of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's "One Day In The Life Of Ivan Denisovich," a grim tale of imprisonment that laid bare for the first time the extent of Stalinist repression in the Soviet Gulag. A sprawling and lethal network of labor camps, the Gulag served as the Soviet regime's main tool of political repression and source of free labor, devastating millions of lives from 1917 to 1960. The author drew on his own eight years in prison for anti-Soviet propaganda, including as prisoner #282 at a special camp for political prisoners at Ekibastuz. But conditions throughout the network were brutal by design. (18 PHOTOS)

Barracks at the Panyshevsky camp
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Barracks at the Panyshevsky camp

A map of the U.S.S.R. with Gulag camp locations marked
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A map of the U.S.S.R. with Gulag camp locations marked

A subdivision of Ozerny Labor Camp No. 7 in 1951
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A subdivision of Ozerny Labor Camp No. 7 in 1951

Female prisoners in overcrowded, poorly heated barracks (undated)
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Female prisoners in overcrowded, poorly heated barracks (undated)

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