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Tbilisi's Changing Face

Georgia's new Presidential Palace, which was completed in 2009.

Georgia's new Presidential Palace, which was completed in 2009.

In recent years, much to the chagrin of some commentators, the Georgian capital Tbilisi has been undergoing something of a structural facelift.

With a rich and varied history, the city has always managed to embrace a range of styles, making it a veritable treasure trove of different architectural visions.

Over the years, many classical, medieval, and even Soviet structures have found a home in Tbilisi.

Under the administration of President Mikheil Saakashvili, however, Georgia's main city has seen the erection of many implacably modern structures of glass and steel.

Although there are many who bemoan the gradual disappearance of Tbilisi's rickety, but charming old wooden buildings, their complaints seem to be falling on deaf ears.

Like it or loathe it, this latest wave of development seems certain to leave an indelible mark on the city landscape, changing its appearance forever.

PHOTO GALLERY: Tbilisi's Evolving Architecture

-- Coilin O'Connor

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