Thursday, April 24, 2014


Multimedia / Photo Gallery Archive

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An Afghan man holds onto a child as he walks with a cage of quails on a hill in Kabul on April 23. (Reuters/Mohammad Ismail)

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April 23, 2014
Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive. More
2014
April 2014

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #16

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Minsk Gets Spruced Up For World Ice Hockey Championship

The Belarusian capital Minsk is getting ready to host the 2014 International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) Championship. The event will be held on 9-25 May 2014 in two main venues, Minsk Arena, a 15,000-seater stadium inaugurated in 2009, and Chizhovka Arena, with a seating capacity of around 10,000. Hotels are being built or renovated to accommodate 5,000 people.

Photogallery Iranian Execution: Last-Minute Reprieve

In a dramatic scene at a scheduled public execution, an Iranian woman spared the life of her son's killer as he stood with a noose around his neck.

Photogallery Shakespeare Around The World

April 23 marks the 450th anniversary of the birth of William Shakespeare, Britain's most famous playwright and one of the most celebrated writers worldwide. Shakespeare's poems and his 37 plays, written between 1590 and 1613, have been translated into every major living language. Here is a look at diverse interpretations of his work, performed everywhere from South Sudan to Sweden and from a metro station to a refugee camp. (13 PHOTOS)

Photogallery A Visit To Moldova's Autonomous Gagauzia Region

In February, Moldova's autonomous region of Gagauzia -- home to a Russian-speaking, ethnically Turkic minority -- voted for closer ties with Russia, and voted against closer EU integration for Moldova. Gagauz voters also supported the region's right to declare independence should Moldova lose or sur

Photogallery Ukraine's Crisis In Political Cartoons

A domineering and sinister Russia, ineffectual Western leaders, and a skeptic's take on political realities in Ukraine: RFE/RL political cartoonists Zhenya O, Corax, and Sergei Yolkin weigh in on the Ukraine crisis.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #15

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Friends And Foes In Akhmetov's Orbit

Getting rich in Ukraine requires powerful friends, and results in powerful enemies. A guide to who's who in the world of oligarch Rinat Akhmetov.

Photogallery A Century Of Political Posters

As Europe marks the centenary of the start of World War I, Prague is hosting an exhibition of political propaganda from the first modern war until today.

Photogallery "Bled for Boston": Remembering The Boston Marathon Bombings

Residents of Boston are marking the first anniversary of the double bombing that struck the city's marathon on April 15, 2013, killing three people and wounding at least 260. Over the past year, photographer Chris Padgett noticed a growing number of Bostonians who commemorated the tragedy with tattoos showing their pride in their city. The trend gained momentum as some tattoo parlors offered to donate the proceeds from Boston-themed tattoos to an aid fund for the bombing victims. Padgett started a photo project called "Bled for Boston" to document, in his words, "the people who dedicated permanent space on their bodies as memorials to their city, first-responders, and the people who lost their lives at the Marathon.”

Photogallery Blast Hits Market In Pakistani Capital

Police were investigating the site of a bomb blast that struck a fruit and vegetable market on the outskirts of the Pakistani capital, Islamabad, early on April 9. The bombing killed at least 25 people and injured at least 70. Officials said the explosives had been placed in a fruit box. (RFE/RL's Radio Mashaal)

Photogallery April 9, 1989: Soviet Crackdown In Tbilisi

In the spring of 1989, Georgians took to the streets to demand independence from the Soviet Union. At the peak of the demonstrations, many thousands of people -- some of them on hunger strike -- gathered in central Tbilisi. On April 9, Soviet Interior Ministry troops moved in to crush the peaceful protests, killing at least 20 people and leaving hundreds injured or poisoned by gas. The crackdown became one of the turning points in the final years of the Soviet Union. (13 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Government Buildings Stormed In Eastern Ukraine

Pro-Russia Ukrainian protesters have stormed the main government building in the eastern city of Donetsk. Some 2,000 protesters rallied outside the regional administration building earlier on April 6, before a group of protesters broke into the building and raised the Russian flag. Meanwhile in Luhansk, also in the east of the country, protesters broke into the headquarters of Ukraine's security agency, the SBU.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #14

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Afghan Voters Go To Polls In Presidential Election

Voting has begun in Afghanistan's presidential election, which will mark the first democratic transfer of power since the country was tipped into chaos by the fall of the hard-line Islamist Taliban regime in 2001. Amid fears of violence and insecurity, thousands of Afghans lined up at polling centers from early morning to cast their ballots. (RFE/RL's Radio Free Afghanistan)

Photogallery A Look At The Work Of Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus, an award-winning photographer who spent her 20-year career covering conflict zones -- including the Balkans, Kuwait, Iraq, and Libya -- was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4. She was in a car in eastern Afghanistan with AP reporter Kathy Gannon when an Afghan policeman opened fire on them, killing Niedringhaus instantly. This is a look at Anja Niedringhaus's work.

Photogallery Nagorno-Karabakh -- Daily Life In A Frozen Conflict

Nearly 20 years have passed since a May 1994 cease-fire put an end to the Nagorno-Karabakh war, and residents are carrying on with ordinary life in the midst of the so-called frozen conflict.

Photogallery Crimea: Playground For The Elite

With its Crimean takeover, Russia has not only expanded its borders -- it's also reclaimed miles of sunny, storied beachfront property. Here's a look at Crimea's history as a prime holiday destination.

Photogallery Afghans Register To Vote

RFE/RL's Frud Bezhan took these pictures at various voter-registration centers in and around Kabul on April 1, the last day of registration for Afghanistan's presidential and provincial elections on April 5.

Photogallery Afghan Street Art Calls For 'Ballots, Not Bullets'

Ahead of Afghanistan's presidential election on April 5, painters in the southern city of Kandahar are using public art to encourage voters to take part. The street-art initiative, called "Vote," was organized by three NGOs in an effort to encourage participation in the democratic process. The call to vote comes amid threats from Taliban militants, who have pledged that they will target voters as well as observers and candidates on election day. (RFE/RL's Radio Free Afghanistan)

March 2014

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #13

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery 100 Years Of Bohumil Hrabal

Born 100 years ago in Brno on March 28, Bohumil Hrabal was one of the most important Czech writers of the 20th century.

Photogallery Iranian Women Soar With Parkour

A group of women in Iran's capital has discovered parkour, the fast-moving sport that blends acrobatics and gymnastics, and made it their outlet for evading social constraints and coping with stress. (AFP)

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #12

Our weekly compilation of some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond.

Photogallery Powerful Russians Hit By Toughest U.S. Sanctions Yet

The United States has levied a new set of sanctions against Russia, targeting some of the most powerful people in the country, including members of Vladimir Putin’s inner circle. Here are some of those individuals.

Photogallery Moscow's Iconic Shukhov Tower Faces Dismantling

Some of the world’s leading architects have petitioned Russian President Vladimir Putin to save Moscow's iconic Shukhov Radio Tower from destruction. In February 2014, the Federal Ministry of Communications agreed to the dismantling of the work of early Soviet constructivism with the hope of reconstructing it elsewhere -- but a final decision by Russian authorities is expected by March 24.

Photogallery Norouz Celebrations Welcome Spring

The first day of spring is celebrated as Norouz, the Persian new year, and is marked on March 21. Across the Middle East, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and elsewhere, Norouz means several days of music, dancing, eating, and other festivities as families celebrate the popular holiday. (18 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Crimean Tatars Bury 'Tortured' Protester

Several hundred Crimean Tatars attended the funeral of a man reportedly abducted and tortured for protesting against the Russian annexation of the peninsula. Simferopol resident Reshat Ametov was found dead on March 16 -- nearly two weeks after he participated in a March 3 protest against the Russian troop presence in Crimea. (Photos by RFE/RL's Tatar-Bashkir Service)

Photogallery Referendum In Crimea

Voting began on March 16 in a disputed referendum in Crimea, the Ukrainian region currently occupied by Russian troops, where inhabitants are being asked whether the peninsula should secede and become part of the Russian Federation or remain in Ukraine. The Ukrainian government and Western states say the vote is "illegitimate," while Moscow insists it is "in line with international law."

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #11

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Kyiv's Shell-Shocked Maidan

Kyiv's Independence Square is quieter and emptier than it was when it became the epicenter of the Maidan protests. Some of the people who remain attempt to busy themselves with errands, chopping wood for fires, or delivering food. Others simply sit, staring into the distance, contemplating Ukraine's uncertain future even as they recover from violent clashes that claimed more than 80 lives. Ordinary residents still make a regular pilgrimage to the square, where mounds of flowers and makeshift memorials continue to honor the victims.

Photogallery Migrant Workers In Russia

In early March, The Center for Documentary Photography in Moscow, FotoDoc, opened a photo exhibition entitled "Them," which presents the work of 20 photojournalists about the life of migrant workers Russia. (17 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Who's Sleeping In Yanukovych's Bed?

After Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych fled Kyiv with his inner circle on the night of February 21-22, activists and journalists quickly occupied the lavish presidential residence he had abandoned. Investigators have been combing through the mansion in search of evidence of government corruption, and the residence was closed to the public on March 10. RFE/RL correspondent Natalie Sedletska filed these photos from the inside of Yanukovych's residence. (9 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Roadside Temples: Unusual Bus Stops Of The Soviet Era

During his travels throughout the former Soviet Union, Canadian photographer Christopher Herwig discovered that the region's bus stops constitute an unexplored world of Soviet-era public art. The relative insignificance of these structures allowed Soviet authorities to give free rein to the local administrators, architects, and artists tasked with designing them. The result was a wide variety of creative expression in the unlikeliest of locales. (15 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Covered: Magazines On 'Putin's Crimean War'

Western magazine covers are having a field day with Russia's military occupation of Crimea, portraying President Vladimir Putin variously as an arsonist, a strait-jacketed crazy, or a devilish, Brezhnevesque presence. Russian-language publications, meanwhile, are largely taking a less strident approach.

Photogallery Three Years After Fukushima, Children's Lives Still Confined Indoors

March 11 marks the third anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. In Koriyama, near the crippled nuclear plant, city officials recommended shortly after the disaster that children under two years old not spend more than 15 minutes outside each day to avoid radiation exposure. Those aged three to five should limit their outdoor time to 30 minutes or less. The limits were lifted last year, but many kindergartens and nursery schools continue to obey them, in line with the wishes of worried parents. (13 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Once Abandoned, A Tiny Azerbaijani Village Survives

The village of Deman, some 300 kilometers from Baku on Azerbaijan's border with Iran, has just 99 inhabitants. Most of the village's former residents were evacuated in 1953 after a border dispute between Iran and the Soviet Union, which resulted in the area being turned into an unoccupied zone. Today, some families persevere in the remote village, and the no-man's-land has become a pasture, accessible only by passing through border posts. (Photos by Abbas Atilay, RFE/RL's Azerbaijani Service)

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #10

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Russia's Military Presence in Crimea

Russia and Ukraine have been locked in a tense stand-off since Russia's upper house of parliament approved the deployment of its forces in Crimea on March 1. Armed men -- without military insignia, but believed to be Russian -- have been guarding airports and government buildings on the Crimean peninsula, while more forces were massing near the Kerch Strait, which separates Crimea from Russia. (11 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #9

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

February 2014

Photogallery Clashes In Crimea

Crowds of ethnic Russians and Crimean Tatars clashed in Simferopol in southern Ukraine on February 26 during protests near the parliament building. The opposing demonstrations were sparked by growing calls for the Crimea region to secede from the rest of the country.The following day, armed men occupied the parliament building as well as another government facility and raised the Russian flag.

Photogallery Winter Olympics: Day 16 And Closing Ceremony

The main events of the final day of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in photos. Russia takes two gold medals. Canada wins the men's ice hockey gold medal match against Sweden. Sochi marks the end of the games with an elaborate closing ceremony.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #8

Yulia Tymoshenko's release, funerals in Kyiv, Winter Olympics action, and Pussy Riot protests -- some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond.

Photogallery Day Of Remembrance In Kyiv

Protesters have remained on Kyiv's Independence Square, saying farewell to the dead and protecting their positions after the intense political violence that shook the country and its leadership.

Photogallery Yulia Tymoshenko's Release From A Prison Hospital

Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko was released from a prison hospital in Kharkiv following a parliamentary vote granting her freedom. She had been imprisoned on abuse of office charges since 2011 that were widely seen as politically motivated.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 15

The selected events of the day in photos from the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Day 15, February 22: On the penultimate of the games, the bronze medal game for men's ice hockey was decided, Russia took two gold medals, and Norway's women skiers took all the medals in cross country mass start event.

Photogallery Moments Of Mourning And Bitter Triumph In Ukraine

Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych left Kyiv while antigovernment protesters took control of the capital's government district and even the grounds of the presidential country house. Many funerals were also held for protesters killed in the recent violent clashes.

Photogallery Yulia Tymoshenko In Pictures

Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko has been a key figure in Ukrainian politics since the country's 2005 Orange Revolution. RFE/RL takes a look at the ups and downs of her dramatic career.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 14

The selected events of the day in photos from the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Day 14, February 21: men's ice-hockey reached the semifinals, the first announced doping case in Sochi, and the Ukrainian women's biathlon relay victory.

Photogallery Deadly Day In Kyiv

The body count mounted dramatically in Kyiv on February 20 as fighting between antigovernment protesters and security forces escalated. Field hospitals were hastily improvised in hotel lobbies in Independence Squares to care for the injured, as video footage showed that some security forces were apparently using live ammunition and sniper rifles. There have been dozens of deaths since fighting broke out on February 18.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 13

The selected events of the day in photos from the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Day 13, February 20: France won all three medals in men's freestyle cross skiing and several of the biggest women's events reached their conclusion.

Photogallery Cossacks Attack Pussy Riot In Sochi

Cossacks attacked the Pussy Riot punk group with whips and pepper spray on February 19 as the group tried to perform under a sign advertising the Sochi Olympics. The group had gathered to perform in a downtown Sochi restaurant, about 30 kilometers from where the Winter Olympics are being held. They left the restaurant wearing bright dresses and ski masks and had only been performing for a few seconds when they were set upon by Cossacks.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 12

The best images from the 12th day of the Sochi Olympics: Hosts Russia are dumped out of the men's ice hockey competition by Finland, while U.S. skier Ted Ligety wins his second Olympic gold medal after a wait of eight years.

Photogallery Flames And Chaos In Kyiv

Buildings and barricades burned on Kyiv's Independence Square after a day and night of clashes that left 26 people dead. The deadly violence on February 18 was the worst since Ukraine's mass antigovernment protests began three months ago.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 11

The main events of the day in photos from the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Day 11, February 18: Russian Nikolai Olyunin won silver in the snowboard men's cross, Slovenian Tina Maze won the ladies' giant slalom, Norway's Emil Hegle Svendsen won gold in the men's mass-start biathlon, and the Dutch filled the podium in men's speed skating.

Photogallery Ukraine's Ethnically Divided Crimea Region

Crimea is Ukraine's only region where ethnic Russians are a majority, comprising approximately 60 percent of its 2 million population. From the 18th century until just 60 years ago this week, the peninsula was part of Russia. And as Ukraine's turmoil shakes the region's ethnic and religious fault lines, there is increasing talk that perhaps it should be again.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 10

Darya Domracheva of Belarus won the 12.5-kilometer women's biathlon. The men's biathlon and men's snowboarding-cross competitions were called off, due to the heavy fog, and Russia won gold in the two-man bobsled competition.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 9

Photos of the main events of the day from the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. On Day 9, February 16, Norway celebrated alpine skiing wins, the U.S. hockey team moved on to the quarterfinals, and Russian ice dancers performed at the Iceberg Palace.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #7

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 8

The main events of the day in photos from the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Day 8, February 15: The United States tops Russia in men's hockey group play, Austria takes gold in the women's Super G, and China wins a speed skating competition.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 7

The main events of the day in photos from the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. Day 7, February 14. Soaring temperatures wreak havoc, the women's 15-kilometer biathlon is twice as nice for Belarus, the Swiss take cross-country and super-combined gold, along with the women's skeleton, women's freestyle skiing, and men's free skating.

Photogallery 2014 World Press Photo Contest Winners

The results are in from the 57th World Press Photo Contest, where the winning photo shows African migrants on the shore of Djibouti City. Other winners cover events from the fighting in Syria to South Africans' reactions to the death of Nelson Mandela.

Photogallery 25th Anniversary Of Iran's Fatwa Against Salman Rushdie

On February 14, 1989, Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini ruled that British writer Salman Rushdie's book "The Satanic Verses" was "blasphemous against Islam" and an Iranian religious foundation offered a bounty for the author's assassination.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 6

The main events of each day in photos at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. Day 6, February 13: The skeleton competition begins, figure skater Yevgeny Plushenko pulls out, and Russia launches its bid to win the Olympic men's ice hockey title with a win over Slovenia.

Photogallery British Figure Skaters Recreate Olympic Routine In Sarajevo

British figure skaters Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean have returned to Bosnia-Herzegovina to recreate their gold-winning performance 30 years after the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo.

Photogallery 25th Anniversary: Last Soviet Forces Withdraw From Afghanistan

On February 15, 1989, Soviet forces officially completed the nine-month process of leaving Afghanistan. The withdrawal came after nearly a decade of war, which had killed more than 14,000 Soviet soldiers and hundreds of thousands of Afghan combatants and civilians. (12 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 5

The first dead heat for gold in the history of the Winter Olympics took place in Sochi on Day 5, February 12, as the preliminary round begins in men's ice hockey.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 4

The main events of each day in photos at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. Day 4, February 11: the women's ski jump makes its Olympic debut, while there are complaints from some athletes and officials about the snowboard and ski courses being dangerous and not well planned.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 3

The main events of each day in photos at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Day 3, February 10, four more sets of medals were won between many trainings, preliminary rounds and heats.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 2

The main events of each day at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Day 2, February 9, the busiest day with eight finals.

Photogallery Anniversary: Iran's 1979 Revolution

Thirty-five years ago, the monarchy of the Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi was toppled and replaced by a government led by Islamic cleric Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. On February 11, 1979, revolutionary forces and rebel troops seized control in Iran, paving the way for Khomeini's elevation to power.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #6

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Winter Olympics, Day 1

The Sochi Olympics are now in full swing a day after the winter games were declared officially open on February 7 by Russian President Vladimir Putin. February 8 saw plenty of action in a number of disciplines, including snowboarding, downhill and cross-country skiing, speed and figure skating, and the biathlon.

Photogallery Bosnia-Herzegovina: The Calm After The Storm

An uneasy calm has now descended on Sarajevo and other Bosnian cities, which have been wracked by fierce protests in recent days. Many locations have been left scarred by violent demonstrations over accusations of corruption among government officials and the state of the country's economy. Bosnia is facing intensifying economic and social problems nearly 20 years after the end of the 1992-1995 civil war. The country of some 3.8 million people is one of the poorest in Europe, with many residents living below official poverty lines. It is estimated that more than 40 percent of Bosnians are unemployed or underemployed. (RFE/RL's Balkan Service)

Photogallery Sochi Olympics Opening Ceremony

With a spectacular show of lights, fireworks, and pageantry, the opening ceremony for the Sochi Olympics kick-started the games on February 7. Russian President Vladimir Putin was in attendance to officially announce the beginning of the event.

Photogallery Misha The Bear And Brezhnev At The 1980 Moscow Olympics

Thirty-four years before the Winter Games in Sochi, the Soviet Union played host to the Summer Olympics in Moscow. Here is a look back at the opening ceremonies on July 19, 1980. (8 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Images Of 'Unbearable Torture'

Ukrainian antigovernment activist Dmytro Bulatov has described being abducted in Kyiv and tortured by his captors for a week. After his release, he traveled to Lithuania for treatment of his injuries. Speaking at a press conference on February 6, he said that he was beaten "hard and professionally" and interrogated every day. These photographs, provided by Bulatov's doctors in Lithuania, show the injuries he suffered.

Photogallery Western Magazine Covers Reflect Hardened View of Putin's Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin had hoped to use the 2014 Sochi Olympics to showcase a Russia that had recovered from the post-Soviet tumult of the 1990s. But his Olympics project has been beset from the outset with questions of corruption, fears over security, and anger over a law banning gay "propaganda" that passed last year. As the Olympics begin, cover art for major western magazines has focused on these issues in lieu of sport.

Photogallery Sarajevo's Abandoned Olympic Sites

In onetime Olympic city, Sarajevo, the infrastructure built for the 1984 Winter Games is slowly turning to rubble. Bosnia-Herzegovina's war of the early 1990s, followed by years of neglect, left its 1984 Olympic sites decaying and forgotten.

Photogallery Olympic Fashion: What They're Wearing In Sochi

Olympic games aren't just about athletic excellence. It seems they are also a competition of colorful and sometimes questionable clothing choices. Here's a look at the occasionally far out fashions that teams and competitors from around the world are sporting.

Photogallery Afghanistan's Presidential Campaign Signs

The campaign for Afghanistan's April 5 presidential election has gotten under way. Colorful signs, billboards, and posters have gone up around the country. Eleven candidates are vying to succeed President Hamid Karzai. (Photos by RFE/RL's Radio Free Afghanistan, Sabawoon)

Photogallery Sochi's Last-Minute Race To The Olympics

Just before the Winter Olympics open on February 7, many facilities in the Russian host city of Sochi remain unfinished. Workers are under pressure to clear construction rubble, fix sewer systems, and pave the streets before the games begin.

Photogallery Money For Medals: How Sochi Athletes Stand To Cash In

Athletes competing at the Sochi Winter Olympics stand to gain tens -- or even hundreds -- of thousands of dollars if they bring home a gold medal. But some of the highest cash bonuses are being offered by countries that are not expected to win any gongs at Sochi, since winter sports such as skiing or curling are not their specialty. (Written by Antoine Blua based on reporting by RFE/RL’s Azerbaijani, Armenian, Belarusian, and Ukrainian services)

Photogallery In Azerbaijan, A Colorful Mosque In Need Of Repair

The Azerbaijani village of Nugedi is home to a unique 19th-century mosque. Built with a wooden frame and decorated with carved wood, it is registered as a historic monument. But, in spite of its protected status, the structure is slowly crumbling and the community has no funds to repair it.

Photogallery Russia Marks 10th Anniversary Of Moscow Metro Attack

On February 6, 2004, an explosion struck a metro train in Moscow, killing at least 41 people and injuring more than 150 others. The blast went off on board a car traveling between the Paveletskaya and Avtozavodskaya stations, near the center of the capital. The explosion -- identified as a suicide bombing -- started a large fire, complicating rescue efforts. Just six months later, the Moscow metro would be struck again by another deadly suicide attack. (11 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Heavy Asian Snow Causes Bedlam

Heavy snowfalls over the last few days have caused traffic chaos, electricity shortages, and other difficulties in Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week

From preparations for the Chinese New Year to the protests in Kyiv --some of the most compelling images from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond.

January 2014

Photogallery Still Life On Kyiv's Independence Square

With Ukrainian protesters occupying several key buildings in Kyiv, the heart of the demonstrations -- Independence Square -- continues to live a life of its own. Antigovernment activists, some of whom have been living on the square for two months, are waiting for opposition leaders' negotiations with the government to move forward. Meanwhile, they fill their time preparing food, battling the cold, and sometimes just playing chess. (Photos by Franak Viachorka, RFE/RL's Belarus Service)

Photogallery Euromaidan Art: Portraits From The Barricades

Illustrator Oleksandr Kom'yakhov and journalist Andriy Pryimachenko have joined forces to produce portraits of Ukraine's Euromaidan protesters.

Photogallery A Look Inside Stalin’s Dacha In Sochi

Long before it hosted the Olympics, the resort city of Sochi was the holiday home of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, who had a summer residence built there in 1937. Stalin's dacha, still furnished with some of the original decorations, is now open for visits from tour groups. (10 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Protesters Storm Ukrainian House

Ukrainian protesters took over a building in Kyiv early on January 26 after opposition leaders spoke to the crowds in Independence Square, vowing to continue their struggle. The protesters had allowed several hundred police to leave the building, known as Ukrainian House, before moving in and occupying it.

Photogallery Ukraine Protests Spread Beyond Capital

The tense standoff between protesters and riot police continues in Kyiv as unrest spreads further throughout the country, especially in western Ukraine. (11 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Seventy Years After The Siege Of Leningrad

Russia is marking the 70th anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on January 27, 1944. The siege by German and Finnish forces during World War II lasted for 872 days -- one of the longest and deadliest in history. Estimates of casualties vary, but some sources state that 1 million residents of Leningrad -- present-day St. Petersburg -- died from hunger, disease, exposure, and shelling. (10 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Protesters Burn Barricades Amid Crisis In Kyiv

A day after intense clashes between protesters and riot police left at least three people dead, activists in Kyiv set fire to tires and barricades, filling the streets with smoke. The main opposition leaders have called on their supporters to refrain from violence, but they have threatened that antigovernment protesters will go "on the offensive" unless President Viktor Yanukovych calls an early election. (16 PHOTOS)

Photogallery The 30th Anniversary Of The Apple Macintosh

On January 24, 1984, the first "Mac" was released. It is considered the first commercially successful personal computer to use a mouse and a graphical user interface, which was modeled after a desktop.

Photogallery The First Winter Olympics: Chamonix 1924

Ninety years ago, on January 25, 1924, the first Winter Olympic Games opened in Chamonix, France. Initially known as Semaine des Sports d'Hiver (International Winter Sports Week), the games were associated with the 1924 Summer Olympics and were later designated as the first Winter Olympic Games. The small mountain resort town invested heavily to build a bobsled run and an ice rink and improve its existing ski jump. (15 PHOTOS)

Photogallery Syria Accused Of Systematic Torture

A legal team commissioned by the Qatari government says it has verified the authenticity of a collection of photos of torture victims in Syria. The large collection images are said to show 11,000 bodies and victims of starvation, torture, and execution. They were reportedly smuggled out of Syria by a police photographer. (Warning: graphic images)

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #4

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery Chaos In the Streets Of Kyiv

Clashes between riot police and antigovernment protesters have shaken the Ukrainian capital since January 19, when thousands gathered to protest harsh new legislation restricting demonstrations. Hundreds of people have been reported injured in the unrest. Protesters threw rocks and petrol bombs, setting fire to cars and buses and using the debris to build barricades in the streets. (Photos by Pavlo Zubyuk, RFE/RL)

Photogallery The Life Of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

January 21 is the 90th anniversary of the death of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the founder of the Bolshevik party and the Soviet state. Here's a look at the life of one of the most influential political figures of the 20th century.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #3

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery In Kyrgyzstan, Protests As Osh Gets New Mayor

Protests broke out January 15 in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh after long-time mayor Melis Myrzakmatov was defeated in indirect elections. City lawmakers voted 25-19 to elect Aitmamat Kadyrbaev, the former deputy governor of the Osh region and an ally of Kyrgyz Prime Minister Jantoro Satybaldiev. (RFE/RL's Kyrgyz Service, Ernist Nurmatov)

Photogallery Historic Islamic Library Reopens In Sarajevo

A new building housing the Gazi Husrev-Beg Library, a collection of more than 100,000 mainly Arabic and Turkish texts, has opened in Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina. The library was founded in 1537 by Gazi Husrev-beg, a provincial governor of Bosnia under Ottoman rule, who also financed many buildings in Sarajevo's old city. The location of the collection was moved many times throughout its history; during Bosnia's war of the 1990s, the collection was housed in eight different locations. The newly built library was funded by donations from Qatar. (Photos by Midhat Poturović, RFE/RL's Balkan Service)

Photogallery A Village Carved From Stone

The village of Kandovan in Iran's East Azerbaijan Province is home to ancient cliff dwellings, some of them inhabited for as long as 700 years.

Photogallery Australian Open Enacts 'Extreme Heat Policy'

Organizers at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne, who had been slammed for forcing players to play on in searing temperatures on January 14-15, enacted the third stage of their "Extreme Heat Policy" for the first time on January 16. Play would continue in all matches until the end of the ongoing set and then cease until conditions eased, a statement said.

Photogallery Czech Student Jan Palach Remembered 45 Years After Self-Immolation

On January 16, 1969, 20-year-old student Jan Palach set himself on fire in Prague in protest against the August 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia by Warsaw Pact troops. He died of his burns three days later. Palach's funeral turned into a mass demonstration of opposition against the Soviet Union's crushing of the liberal reforms of the Prague Spring. His act of protest inspired two other Czechs -- Jan Zajic and Evzen Plocek -- to commit suicide by self-immolation in the following months, followed by several in other communist countries. In 1989, on the 20th anniversary of Palach's death, gatherings in his memory turned into mass anticommunist protests, giving momentum to the Velvet Revolution that brought down the communist regime later that year.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #2

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond, including refugees in South Sudan, demonstrations in Ukraine, and Dennis Rodman in North Korea.

Photogallery Sarajevo Remembers 'Uncle Misho'

Since January 7, Sarajevans have been paying tribute to legendary shoe cleaner "Uncle Miso," who died at the age of 83 after more than 60 years working on the streets, even during the 1992-95 war.

Photogallery Daily Life In Abkhazia

Georgia's breakaway territory of Abkhazia borders Russia and is just a few dozen kilometers from the Black Sea resort city of Sochi, which will host the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in February.

Photogallery Orthodox, Eastern Rite Christians Celebrate Christmas

Most Orthodox and Eastern Rite Christians celebrate Christmas according to the Julian calendar on January 7, two weeks after Christians who observe the holiday using the Gregorian calendar. Here's a look at how the Orthodox holiday was observed in a number of different countries, from Eastern Europe to the Middle East.

Photogallery Georgia's Super Grandparents

Twenty-one contestants over the age of 70 took part in a special Super Grandmother and Super Grandfather competition in Tbilisi on January 6.

Photogallery 'Polar Vortex' Brings Extreme Cold To United States

A severe cold snap has struck the Midwest of the United States and is expected to spread to the Northeast, which has already seen several days of heavy snowfall. The unusual weather conditions, known as a "polar vortex," could send local temperatures to their lowest points in 20 years. Authorities in many places have urged residents to stay indoors and stock up on food, while the National Weather Service described the cold as "life-threatening." More than 1,300 flights were canceled on January 5 at Chicago's O'Hare Airport, one of the country's busiest airports.

Photogallery Photos Of The Week #1

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photogallery The Future, As It Used To Look

As early as 1899, French artists were imagining the world as it would look in the 21st century. Works by Jean-Marc Cote and other artists were first produced for the World Exposition in Paris, and were later enclosed in cigarette and cigar boxes. The drawings, described by the artists as utopian in view, envisioned everything from mechanized barber shops and flying policemen to diving underwater -- to fish for seagulls flying overhead.

2014

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