Monday, December 22, 2014



Photos Of The Week #51

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond for the 51st week of 2014. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

2014: The Year In Photos

In 2014, Ukraine spiraled into civil conflict, fresh violence shook Gaza, and the Islamic State militant group seized swathes of Iraq and Syria. These are some of the photographs that tell the stories of the year.

My Ukraine: Memory & Identity

In Ukraine, your past can say a lot about your future. And as the country continues to struggle for the right to shape its 21st-century identity, many people are reexamining their family roots as a reminder of who they are today. RFE/RL correspondent Daisy Sindelar recently traveled to six Ukrainian cities -- Kyiv, Lviv, Uzhhorod, Odesa, Dnipropetrovsk, and Kharkiv -- to talk to people about their old family photographs. What she found was a country whose tumultuous 20th-century history is far from forgotten. Fourteen Ukrainians have shared their stories, and photographs, for the "My Ukraine" project. This is but a brief sampling. Find the entire project by clicking here.

More Than 130 Dead In Pakistan School Attack

Islamist militants have killed more than 130 people at a military-run school in Peshawar, most of them children, in a devastating assault Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif called a "national tragedy unleashed by savages." The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the December 16 attack, one of the deadliest carried out militants in Pakistan.

Photos Of The Week #50

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond for the 50th week of 2014. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photos Of The Week #49

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond for the 49th week of 2014. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Ribbon Protest In Minsk

Organizers in Belarus hoped on December 6 to distribute some 5,000 meters of the red-and-white ribbons, whose colors are synonymous with the country's long-simmering opposition to President Alyaksandr Lukashenka and his dictatorial 20-year rule. These images were taken by RFE/RL's Belarus Service.

Armenian Families Still Feel Impact Of 1988 Earthquake

Twenty-six years ago, on December 7, 1988, a 6.8 magnitude earthquake struck northwestern Armenia, then part of the Soviet Union. The catastrophe killed some 31,000 people, injured 130,000, and left many more homeless. The town of Gyumri, then known as Leninakan, was the hardest hit, and has yet to recover. Thousands of people moved away, but others who lost their homes lacked the resources to leave, and were forced to find makeshift housing. Today, about 600 families continue to live in shacks or Soviet-era wagons without running water or power. (Text and photos by Anthony Georgieff)

Photos Of The Week #48

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond for the 48th week of 2014. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Afghanistan As It Once Was

The Kabul in William Podlich's photographs is an almost unrecognizable place -- a bustling capital of nattily attired men and women; modern cars; and green parks. A place where women could freely walk the streets. A peaceful place where tourists could take buses to the major historic sites in the country or across the border to Pakistan.

Back In The U.S.S.R.: The Soviet Union In Color In 1963

Pretend you’re rummaging through an old steamer trunk in a dusty antique store. Hidden amidst some old Frank Sinatra LPs you discover a stack of photographic slides wrapped in a yellowed newspaper. That’s how we’d like to think these 24 photographs of the Soviet Union were discovered. But the truth is, we don’t know much about them. (24 PHOTOS)

Photos Of The Week #47

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond for the 47th week of 2014.

Crumbling Buildings, Homemade Wine

The breakaway region of Abkhazia has endured the chilling effects of a "frozen conflict" since the early 1990s, when it sought to split from Georgia as that country was fighting for its own independence from the Soviet Union.

The Evolution Of Euromaidan

Euromaidan -- the name given to the pro-European protests in Ukraine's capital, Kyiv -- started late on November 21, 2013, when up to 2,000 protesters gathered on the city's central Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square). The movement, sparked by President Viktor Yanukovych's abrupt decision to abandon talks on a pact on closer relations with the European Union, started peacefully, but did not end that way. The violence started with the government's crackdown on protesters overnight on November 30. Months later, Yanukovych would flee the country and around 100 protesters would be dead.

A Journey Into A Mysterious Siberian Crater

Three massive craters were discovered this summer on the Yamal Peninsula in northern Siberia. In an effort to understand the origins of the newly formed craters, a group of scientists descended into one of the holes, reaching a frozen lake at the bottom.

Czechs Give President The Red Card

Thousands of Czechs held symbolic red cards in the air on November 17, in a protest against President Milos Zeman. The gathering came on the 25th anniversary of the Velvet Revolution, the peaceful overthrow of Czechoslovakia's communist regime in 1989. Protesters are angry with what they regards as Zeman's pro-Russian stance on European Union sanctions on Russia, his criticism of the Russian punk group Pussy Riot who were jailed for denouncing Vladimir Putin in a Moscow cathedral, as well as his use of vulgar language during a recent radio interview.

A Look Back At The Velvet Revolution, 25 Years Later

On November 17, Slovakia and the Czech Republic remember 25 years since the Velvet Revolution. Eight days after the fall of the Berlin Wall, a student protest against communist rule was violently put down in Prague. The following day, theaters went on strike and students occupied university campuses. Within days hundreds of thousands of people were on the streets, and by the end of the month the Communist Party agreed to hold free elections. In December, dissident playwright Vaclav Havel was elected president by the country's Federal Assembly and democracy was restored.

Photos Of The Week #46

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive.

Photos Of The Week #45

Some of the most compelling photographs from RFE/RL's broadcast region and beyond. For more photo galleries, see our "Picture This" archive by clicking on the banner above.

Most Popular