Sunday, March 29, 2015


Audio Podcast: Can Ukraine's Oligarchs Be Housebroken?

Poroshenko (center) and the oligarchs: Rinat Akhmetiv (top left), Dmytro Firtash (top right), Viktor Pinchuk (bottom left), Ihor Kolomoyskiy (bottom right)

They got obscenely rich in the post-Soviet chaos. They leveraged their political contacts into wealth. And they leveraged their wealth into more political power.

The most powerful among them are Russian-speakers. But when the Russia-Ukraine conflict erupted, many sided with Kyiv. And they expected to be rewarded.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko's decision this week to sack Ihor Kolomoyskiy as governor of Dnipropetrovsk marks a new chapter in the Ukrainian authorities' relationship with the country's oligarchs.

It also heralds the start of a tricky, dangerous, and perilous stage in Ukraine's post-Euromaidan efforts to build a law-based state.

On this week's Power Vertical Podcast, we look at Ukraine's struggle to rein in its oligarchs against the backdrop of its conflict with Russia.

Joining me are Rostyslav Kostyn of RFE/RL's Ukrainian Service and Taras Kuzio, a senior research associate for the Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies at the University of Alberta.

Enjoy...

The Power Vertical Podcast: Can Ukraine's Oligarchs Be Housebroken?
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Listen to or download the podcast above or subscribe to "The Power Vertical Podcast" on iTunes.​

Tags:Power Vertical podcast, Ukraine, oligarchs, Ihor Kolomoyskiy, Petro Poroshenko, Russia-Ukraine conflict


Video The Daily Vertical: Putin's Cyberwar At Home

The Daily Vertical: Putin's Cyber War At Homei
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March 27, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Video The Daily Vertical: Silly Season

The Daily Vertical: Silly Seasoni
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March 26, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Video The Daily Vertical: Bulldogs Under The Carpet

The Daily Vertical: Bulldogs Under The Carpeti
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March 25, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Was Surkov Behind The LifeNews Raid?

Vladislav Surkov

It's not everyday that LifeNews gets raided. And when it does, it is usually a signal that something pretty significant is going on.

LifeNews, of course, is a pro-Kremlin "news" organization with close ties to the Federal Security Service (FSB). In fact, it's practically an adjunct of the FSB. It's used for all sorts of purposes, such as smearing Kremlin opponents, planting disinformation, and floating trial balloons.

To raid LifeNews you need to have some serious juice behind you.

So what's going on? It's early yet, but there are a few data points out there to connect.

According to initial press reports and a statement on the LifeNews website, the raid was triggered by a complaint that one of its reports on crimes against minors revealed personal information about the victims. Russian law prohibits news organizations from revealing any identifying information about underage crime victims.

But of course, nothing in Russia is ever that simple. Pro-Kremlin outfits rarely, if ever, get targeted in cases like this. And when they do, it is invariably the result of some kind of palace intrigue.

The complaint against LifeNews's report came from the rights organization Soprotivlenie, or Resistance. The group is run by Olga Kostina, the wife of political fixer Konstantin Kostin.

Currently, Kostin runs a think tank called the Civil Society Development Foundation. But he has a long Kremlin resume. He worked on Boris Yeltsin's 1996 reelection, on Vladimir Putin's 2000 and 2004 presidential campaigns, and on Dmitry Medvedev's in 2008.

He also served in the Kremlin's political department from 2008-12. And significantly -- and this is where it gets really interesting -- he is widely considered to be one of Vladislav Surkov's chief lieutenants. In fact, Kremlin-watchers have long considered him Surkov's right-hand-man. 

So is this the hand of Surkov? The evidence is highly circumstantial -- but worth considering.

Once the Kremlin's chief spin doctor and ideologist, Surkov has seen his influence wane considerably since Vladimir Putin's return to the Kremlin in 2012. He lost his position as deputy Kremlin chief of staff and chief political operative to Vyacheslav Volodin, a bitter rival.

But Putin is known to value Surkov and kept him close as a Kremlin adviser. He has played a major role in the Ukraine crisis and is widely believed to covet his old job and status.

And, oh by the way, Surkov is a close ally of Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov. And since the February 27 assassination of opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, Kadyrov has been locked in a bitter struggle with whom? The FSB.

Again, it is very early and all this is very circumstantial. But my initial reaction to the raid on LifeNews is that it seems to be one of those data points that suggests some serious -- and potentially consequential -- Kremlin infighting.

-- Brian Whitmore​


Video The Daily Vertical: Hybrid War Is So 2014

The Daily Vertical: Hybrid War Is So 2014i
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March 24, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Video The Daily Vertical: Putin's 'Fascist International'

The Daily Vertical: Putin's 'Fascist International'i
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March 23, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Audio Podcast: Three Weeks That Shook The Kremlin

An opposition leader is slain. A president goes AWOL. And his underlings go for each other's throats.

It's been three weeks that shook the Kremlin. And at the center of it all were two pillars of Vladimir Putin's autocratic regime: his beloved FSB and his handpicked Chechen leader, Ramzan Kadyrov.

Veteran Russia-watcher Edward Lucas told Britain's itv news this week that "we're seeing rivets popping inside the Kremlin in a way we haven't seen before."

We are indeed. And they're some very big rivets.

The latest Power Vertical Podcast tries to unpack the ongoing political turmoil gripping the Russian elite since the February 27 assassination of opposition leader Boris Nemtsov.

Joining me is co-host Mark Galeotti, a professor at New York University, an expert on the Russian security services, and author of the blog In Moscow's Shadows.

Also on the podcast, Mark and I examine an old cliche about Russian politics -- that it operates like a mafia state -- and ask whether it is actually appropriate.

Enjoy...

Power Vertical Podcast: Three Weeks That Shook The Kremlin
Power Vertical Podcast: Three Weeks That Shook The Kremlini
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Tags:Power Vertical podcast, Nemtsov assassination, Vladimir Putin, Ramzan Kadyrov, Russian politics, Russian organized crime


The Daily Vertical: The Crimea Question

The Daily Vertical: The Crimea Questioni
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March 20, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Video The Daily Vertical: Wolf At The Door

The Daily Vertical: Wolf At The Doori
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March 19, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

 The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


The Warlord Checkmates The Tsar

"I will always be grateful to Vladimir Vladimirovich for everything he has done for me and for my people," Ramzan Kadyrov (right) wrote recently.

Has Ramzan Kadyrov successfully blackmailed the Kremlin?

In all the hoopla over Vladimir Putin resurfacing, a pretty important news item managed to slip below the radar.

On March 16, the same day the Kremlin leader appeared, Interfax quoted an unidentified law- enforcement official as saying that the assassination of Boris Nemtsov has been reclassified from a "contract killing" to a "hate crime."

The report is still unconfirmed. But if the official line becomes that this was not a contract killing, then there is no need to investigate who put out the contract.

There is no need to look beyond Zaur Dadayev and the others rounded up in connection with the hit. 

There is no need to ask any uncomfortable -- and destabilizing -- questions.

By targeting Dadayev --the former deputy commander of a paramilitary unit founded by Kadyrov -- the Federal Security Service (FSB) seemed to be ultimately targeting Kadyrov.

And now, it appears, that Kadyrov has successfully beaten back the FSB's assault.

It was amid this turmoil that Putin vanished from public view on March 5, just six days after Nemtsov was assassinated and three days before Dadayev was charged.

"Putin appeared, live and legitimate, at exactly the same moment when Interfax reported that the Nemtsov assassination wasn't a contract hit," political analyst Leonid Volkov wrote on Facebook

"Putin had to make a choice. Either feed Kadyrov to the FSB-men, or give up the FSB to Kadyrov. It's a difficult and unpleasant choice.... And he chose the one and only thing he could choose: Kadyrov."

A Tribute -- And A Threat

Over the 10 days, 21 hours, four minutes, and 20 seconds that Putin was holed up in an undisclosed location -- before turning up in St. Petersburg on March 16 for a meeting with Kyrgyz President Almazbek Atambaev -- a lot of weird stuff happened.

Kadyrov publicly praised Dadayev, went to a shooting range to pop a few rounds, and posted the video on Instagram. The Chechen leader also posted a letter on Instagram expressing his enduring loyalty to Putin.

"I will always be grateful to Vladimir Vladimirovich for everything he has done for me and for my people," Kadyrov wrote.

"I will always be his faithful companion, regardless of whether he is president or not. To give one's life for such a person is an easy task."

But within the profession of loyalty, there was also a veiled threat -- one that was punctuated by the shooting range outing. I am loyal, Kadyrov seemed to be saying. But others may not be. And taking me down carries risks.

And somebody was apparently listening.

It's worth noting that over a nine-day period, Kadyrov has been given no fewer than three state awards.

On March 9, shortly after Dadayev was arrested and charged, he was given the Order of Merit, the state's highest honor. On March 16, the day Putin reappeared in public, he received a medal For Devotion and Duty from authorities in Russia-annexed Crimea. And on March 18, he was honored by the Federal Penitentiary Service. 

"Kadyrov is now the pillar, basis, and essence of Russian statehood. Even more so than all of the FSB combined," Volkov wrote on Facebook.

Connecting The Dots

Unpacking the Nemtsov assassination, the ensuing investigation, Kadyrov's emergence at the center of it, and the Chechen leader's battle with the FSB involves interpreting and connecting a lot of disparate data points.

"We're seeing rivets popping inside the Kremlin in a way we haven't seen before," longtime Kremlin-watcher Edward Lucas, author of The New Cold War, told Britain's itv.

Kadyrov is widely known to covet a high post in Moscow. And he is also believed to want his cousin and close associate, Adam Delimkhanov, to replace him in Chechnya.

The idea makes many in Russia's elite nervous -- not least of all, the FSB brass. Moreover, enmity between Kadyrov and the FSB goes way back.

In May 2007, shortly after Kadyrov was named Chechnya's leader, the local FSB refused to allow a group of his armed men into their headquarters. Kadyrov responded by having all the building's entrances and exits welded shut.The standoff was only resolved when Nikolai Patrushev, then the FSB director, intervened personally. 

And there are strong indications that the FSB is trying to take both Kadyrov and Delimkhanov down.

Like in the Nemtsov assassination, the FSB also took the lead role in investigating the attempted assassination of Saigidpasha Umakhanov, a foe of Kadyrov's and the mayor of Khasavyurt, Daghestan's third-largest city.

In February, just weeks before Nemtsov was gunned down, a court in Daghestan sentenced two Chechens to long prison sentences for plotting Umakhanov's killing. In a recent report Novaya Gazeta quoted FSB officials as saying the assassination plot was ordered and masterminded by none other than Delimkhanov. 

Another report by Novaya Gazeta quoted unidentified law enforcement officials as saying the real organizer of the Nemtsov assassination was a Chechen security officer, also with close ties to Kadyrov, identified only as "Major Ruslan." 

Subsequent press reports have claimed that the mysterious Major Ruslan was Ruslan Geremeyev -- who is Delimkhanov's nephew.

Late Putinism

Will the assault on Kadyrov now ebb? And if it does, will he continue to become more powerful and more brazen?

Or will the FSB regroup and renew its assault? One hint that this might be the case came in a report in RBK on March 17.

Citing unidentified law enforcement officials, it claimed that Dadayev and Geremeyev planned Nemtsov's assassination in a Moscow cafe. According to the report, Geremeyev paid Dadayev 5 million rubles ($83,000) and provided him weapons. 

So we still seem to be in a battle of leaks, each with conflicting accounts of whether this was a hate crime that stops with Dadayev or whether it is a contract killing that leads from Dadayev to Geremeyev to Delimkhanov -- and ultimately to Kadyrov.

Neither narrative is great for the regime.

"If Kadyrov were indeed freelancing into political assassinations in Moscow and were allowed to walk away unpunished, he would be taking Putin and the entire Russian leadership hostage, which might be precisely his plan," political analyst Vladimir Frolov wrote in The Moscow Times. Frolov adds that a "full investigation and arrests of co-conspirators risk destabilization in Chechnya escalating into war." 

Either way, an increasing number of Kremlin-watchers are coming to the conclusion that the period beginning on February 27 with Nemtsov's assassination and continuing through Putin's odd vanishing act marks the dawn of late Putinism -- the twilight of the regime in its current form.

"Has the Russian regime's agony begun," asks a recent article by the prominent Russian political analyst Lilia Shevtsova in The American Interest. 

Shevtsova notes that Putin's "steely-eyed resolve" is gone, he "is losing control," and "can’t give his entourage clear orders." Nemtsov's assassination, she adds, has "shattered the mirrored window concealing the Kremlin; now everyone can see the mess within."

-- Brian Whitmore

Tags:Vladimir Putin, Ramzan Kadyrov, Nemtsov assassination


The Daily Vertical: Between Kadyrov And The FSB

The Daily Vertical: Between Kadyrov And The FSBi
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March 18, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Video The Daily Vertical: Alive But Not Well

The Daily Vertical: Alive But Not Welli
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March 17, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

ThDaily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Video The Daily Vertical: Late Putinism

The Daily Vertical: Late Putinismi
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March 16, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Audio The Warlord And The Tsar

Ramzan Kadyrov and Vladimir Putin were at center stage this week for different reasons.

Kadyrov due to suspicions he was behind the February 27 assassination of opposition figure Boris Nemstov, which placed him at the epicenter of an apparent Kremlin clan war.

And Puin was in the spotlight by disappearing, sparking widespread rumors about his health as his underlings edged toward open conflict.

On this week's Power Vertical Podcast, we take a closer look at Kadyrov's emergence at the center of the Nemtsov assassination, the clan battles in the Kremlin, and Putin's mysterious disappearance from public view.

Joining me are Aslan Doukayev, director of RFE/RL's North Caucasus Service; Kirill Kobrin, editor of the Moscow-based history and sociology magazine Neprikosnovenny Zapas; and Sean Guillory of the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Russian and Eastern European Studies, author of Sean's Russia Blog, and host of the newly launched SRB Podcast.

Enjoy...

Power Vertical Podcast: The Warlord And The Tsar
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Tags:Power Vertical podcast, Ramzan Kadyrov, Nemtsov assassination


Video The Daily Vertical: With Or Without Putin

The Daily Vertical: With Or Without Putini
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March 13, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter@PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


The Sick Man Of Moscow

Vladimir Putin may well be seriously ill, or worse.

He hasn't appeared in public in a week, he just canceled a trip to Kazakhstan and a series of meetings in Moscow, and the hashtag #ПутинУмер (Putin Died) is trending like mad on Twitter. There have been reports in the Russian media that he's had a stroke.

Whether Putin is sick, or "is feeling fine," as his spokesman Dmitry Peskov insists, the system he presides over is far from healthy. Even if Putin the man is in top form, the "collective Putin," Russia's informal ruling circle, is showing signs of deep distress.

In fact, over the past two weeks, since the February 27 assassination of opposition figure Boris Nemtsov, it has appeared to be in the throes of a crisis. Informal rules have been violated, rivalries among figures near the top of the power pyramid have escalated into open conflict, and Putin has been conspicuous by his absence.

And while it is impossible for outsiders to truly know what is going on in the opaque world of the Kremlin's inner sanctum, there seem to be two possible explanations for Putin's disappearance from public view.

Either he is fine and furiously working behind the scenes to calm the clan warfare that has emerged in the wake of the Nemtsov assassination.

Or Putin is truly sick and incapacitated and the recent turbulence we have witnessed -- from the assassination to the muddled narratives in the investigation to the open conflict between the Federal Security Service (FSB) and Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov -- are symptoms of a highly personalized system that has lost its head.

New Rules?

In a political system like Russia's, where formal institutions are weak, court politics are paramount, and personal ties mean everything, obscure signals and gestures matter a lot. So do informal rules. They have to, because the law doesn't apply to those on the top.

This was one of the reasons why the Nemtsov assassination was so shocking. Killing somebody this prominent -- and certainly doing the deed blocks from Red Square -- was against the rules.

As Ivan Yakovina, a former political correspondent for Lenta.ru, wrote recently in the Ukrainian newspaper Novoye Vremya, "Moscow's unspoken rules" forbid killing those other top politicians. Even those such as Nemtsov, a former deputy prime minister, who had gone into opposition.

The killing, therefore, was "a signal to all representatives of this class," Yakovina added.

And if the Nemtsov assassination has violated one of the cardinal edicts of Putinism, the aftermath violated another: Clan warfare among top members of the elite must not be played out in public.

When the FSB named Zaur Dadayev -- a man with close ties to Kadyrov - as the mastermind of the Nemtsov assassination, it was interpreted in the elite as a direct assault on the Chechen strongman.

Kadyrov is powerful. Perhaps one of the most powerful men in Russia. He has thousands of loyal armed men at his disposal; he has a strong lobby in the Interior Ministry; he counts key Kremlin power brokers like Vladislav Surkov as his allies; and he has long enjoyed Putin's support.

But he has also acquired powerful enemies, including Kremlin chief of staff Sergei Ivanov, Kremlin political overlord Vyacheslav Volodin, and FSB chief Aleksandr Bortnikov.

And Kadyrov's enemies now appear to be using the Nemtsov assassination to take him down.

In a recent interview, the prominent journalist and Kremlin-watcher Oleg Kashin noted that it was significant that Dadayev and the other suspects in the Nemtsov case were arrested by the FSB and made public by Bortnikov himself.

"Up until now, Bortnikov was not a public person who announces somebody's arrest," Kashin said. "This is usually done by Investigative Committee spokesman Vladimir Markin."

This, Kashin added, also reeked of a "siloviki war" -- a showdown among the security services -- since Dadayev served as deputy commander of Battalion Sever, an Interior Ministry paramilitary unit formed by the Chechen leader.

"Bortnikov struck a blow against Kadyrov," journalist and political commentator Orkhan Dzhemal told Ekho Moskvy.

"There's a battle going on. The Spasskaya is fighting the Borovitskaya," he said, metaphorically referring to the two famous Kremlin towers.

Battle Of The Titans

The battle played out in media reports about the Nemtsov investigation, too. A report in the pro-Kremlin tabloid Moskovsky Komsomolets claimed that Dadayev had retracted his confession and claimed he was tortured

There was also a story in the opposition Novaya Gazeta that quoted unidentified law-enforcement officials who claimed the authorities know who really organized the Nemtsov hit -- a mysterious Chechen security officer, also with close ties to Kadyrov, identified only as "Major Ruslan."

In fact, the FSB assault on Kadyrov appeared to commence in earnest before the Nemtsov assassination.

In February, a Daghestani court sentenced two Chechens to nine and 12 years in prison on for plotting the assassination of Saigidpasha Umakhanov, a rival of Kadyrov's and the mayor of the region's third-largest city.

The FSB also took the lead role in that case. And in a report this week -- note the timing -- Novaya Gazeta quoted FSB officials as saying the assassination was ordered by Adam Delimkhanov, Kadyrov's cousin and close associate. 

If a battle between Kadyrov and the FSB is about to go full-throttle, it would be a war of the titans that could shake the Putin system to its core.

And Kadyrov's behavior -- from his much-publicized trip to a shooting range this week to the statement he posted on Instagram where he wrote that he would lay down his life for Putin -- suggest that he senses the danger.

But for the time being, at least, Putin is nowhere in sight.

-- Brian Whitmore

 

Tags:Vladimir Putin, Nemtsov assassination, Ramzan Kadyrov, Russian politics, Kremlin clans


Video The Daily Vertical: It's All About Kadyrov

The Daily Vertical: It's All About Kadyrovi
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March 12, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.
The Daily Vertical: It's All About Kadyrov

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


The Daily Vertical: An Elegant Diversion

The Daily Vertical: An Elegant Diversioni
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March 11, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.


Video The Daily Vertical: Putin's Kadyrov Dilemma

The Daily Vertical: Putin's Kadyrov Dilemmai
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March 10, 2015
The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

The Daily Vertical is a video primer for Russia-watchers that appears Monday through Friday. Viewers can suggest topics via Twitter @PowerVertical or on the Power Vertical Facebook page.

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About This Blog

The Power Vertical is a blog written especially for Russia wonks and obsessive Kremlin watchers by Brian Whitmore. It covers emerging and developing trends in Russian politics, shining a spotlight on the high-stakes power struggles, machinations, and clashing interests that shape Kremlin policy today. Check out The Power Vertical Facebook page or