Friday, April 18, 2014


Persian Letters

Nokia Says It Has 'Restricted' Business With Iran

A Nokia protest graphic that was circulated in Iran last year.A Nokia protest graphic that was circulated in Iran last year.
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A Nokia protest graphic that was circulated in Iran last year.
A Nokia protest graphic that was circulated in Iran last year.
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We've reported (Here, here, and here) about the criticism and anger at Nokia for providing Iran technology that has been reportedly used by the authorities to repress political activists.

In a September 28 statement, Nokia Siemens Networks said that it had restricted its business with Iran following "credible reports" that the Iranian authorities use communications technology to suppress political activity.

Nokia Siemens Networks is aware of credible reports that the Iranian authorities use communications technology to suppress political activity in a way that is inconsistent with that government's human rights obligations.

As a result, Nokia Siemens Networks halted all work related to monitoring centers in Iran in 2009. Nokia Siemens Networks divested its monitoring center business in 2009 and will no longer provide monitoring centers to any country.

The company has voluntarily restricted its business in Iran by not seeking or accepting new customers and by limiting its activities with its current customers.

The statement was issued following an September 4 meeting between Nokia representatives and Iranian Nobel Peace laureate Shirin Ebadi, who had called on Nokia to clarify its position on its business with Iran.

Ebadi has told the International Campaign on Human Rights that the Nokia Siemens action is a major accomplishment "for Iranians and for people of the world".

"This means that when a company realizes that the goods it provided are being used in an inappropriate manner, the company will not extend its contract and avoid sacrificing human rights values for financial gain."

-- Golnaz Esfandiari
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About This Blog

Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.

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Seen anything in the Iranian blogosphere that you think Persian Letters should cover? If so, contact Golnaz Esfandiari at esfandiarig@rferl.org