Thursday, December 18, 2014


The Power Vertical

'Permanent Revolution'

Is Medvedev aiming to be Russia's next great reformer?
Is Medvedev aiming to be Russia's next great reformer?

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has roundly criticized his country for what he calls a humiliating dependence on natural resources, a "half-Soviet" social sphere, and instability in the Caucasus.


The criticism, published on the gazeta.ru website, appears in an open letter on the country's strategic challenges, addressed to the Russian people under the headline "Forward Russia!"


"Should we continue to drag into the future our primitive raw-materials economy," Medvedev writes, "endemic corruption, and inveterate habit of relying on the state, foreign countries or some all-powerful doctrine to solve our problems -- on anyone except ourselves?"


Looking back for precedents, Medvedev lauds the reforms of Peter the Great and the Soviet Union, but criticizes them for "destroying millions of lives."


"Today, for the first time in our history," he writes, "we have the chance to prove to ourselves and the world that Russia can develop democratically."


Medvedev says the government has developed a plan to advance the economy by making Russia a leader in technology, energy efficiency, and space infrastructure. For it to succeed, Medvedev writes, "Russia's political system will also be extremely open, flexible, and intrinsically complex."


Calling for a "permanent revolution," Medvedev vows Russia will become an "active and respected member of the world community of free nations." He calls on Russians to e-mail the Kremlin with suggestions.


Medvedev's letter, posted on a leading independent news website, is the latest in a series of exercises burnishing his image as a liberalizing reformer. But although exhaustive on vague, overarching goals, Medvedev fails to offer a single concrete policy change that would bring about the drastic reform he seeks.


Critics will note that Medvedev -- former President Vladimir Putin's handpicked successor, who came to power last year after Putin's eight years in office -- never hints at criticism of his mentor. Putin revived authoritarianism in Russia by cracking down on democratic institutions and the free press, and most Russians believe he retains power in his current role as prime minister.


Since Putin's ascent 10 years ago, corruption has ballooned, society has become far more closed, and the government has done virtually nothing to alleviate a deepening dependence on the oil and gas industry that fuelled Russia's decade-long economic boom.


Some will surely take Medvedev's liberal-sounding rhetoric to indicate a growing split between him and Putin. But his letter echoes many previous calls for reform by him and Putin, and others will see it as another installment of the kind of public relations exercise Russia's leaders rely on to stay in power.

-- Gregory Feifer

Tags: reform,medvedev,Russia,corruption

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Jordan Hoiberg from: RSM
September 11, 2009 04:00
Hmmm... sounds like something the Bolsheviks would have said, and to finish off the analogy, the government does nothing to interfere with their windfall profits from nationalized oil companies (Rosneft, Gazpom, etc.). Can't really blame the Russian people for not taking action after the 90's though. At least for now, with Putin, its not the belief that "things can't get worse" its the belief that "we'd best not screw the pooch too bad". Anyways, I'm interested to see what happen when the recession's impact is fully felt and Putin's seemingly infallible popularity rating starts to drop. Guess we'll have to see if the Russian mentality has changed at all at that time.

by: Ray from: Lawrence, KS
September 11, 2009 13:53
Words, words, words. Reading between the lines, the only difference between this hot air and that of his predecessor/boss is the absence of blaming the west/US for Russia's problems (might be located in secret, unpublished protocol). Moreover, I could find no reference to this article among the popular sources of Russian news. Nothing more that fastfood for the liberal gristmill, filling but not nutritional.

by: Dave Stone from: Manhattan, KS
September 14, 2009 15:33
The title here is misleading; Medvedev does NOT actually call for a permanent revolution. What he says is that he wants to "disappointment / dismay (ogorchit')" those who want permanent revolution. His point is measured, careful reform.

by: Paul from: Canada
September 22, 2009 13:31
Is there an English translation of this article available? (I can't seem to track one down...)

by: Dave Stone from: Manhattan, KS
October 01, 2009 00:02
Paul--my post on the speech has links to both the English and Russian versions:<br />http://russian-front.com/2009/09/15/dmitrii-medvedev-and-permanent-revolution/

The Power Vertical Feed

In this space, I will regularly comment on events in Russia, repost content and tweets I find interesting and informative, and shamelessly promote myself (and others whose work I like). The traditional Power Vertical Blog remains for larger and more developed items. The Podcast, of course, will continue to appear every Friday. I hope you find the new Power Vertical Feed to be a useful resource and welcome your feedback. More

18:16 December 09, 2014

THE EYE OF SAURON IS OVER MOSCOW...

...and the Russian Orthodox Church is not happy about it.

17:03 December 09, 2014

A NEW DESIGN FOR THE 100-RUBLE NOTE?

10:00 December 09, 2014

IS FRANCE THE NEW GERMANY?

What to make of French President Francois Hollande's meeting with Vladimir Putin this weekend? The Moscow Times takes a look in a story today:

The weekend meeting between the French and Russian presidents has given France a chance to become "the new Germany" for Russia, which lost its last Western ally after a falling-out with official Berlin, analysts say.

French mediation "is aimed at preventing Russia-EU relations from going to the dogs," said Tatiana Kastueva-Jean of the French Institute of International Relations (IFRI) in Paris.

Germany has traditionally been Russia's staunchest defender in Europe. But with Berlin taking a harder line in the wake of the Ukraine crisis, and particularly the downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17, Paris os trying to fill the void:

Though France has backed EU sanctions against Russia over Ukraine, it has taken a notably moderate stance toward Moscow.

Hollande was one of the few Western leaders who did not give Putin a hard time at a G20 meeting in Australia's Brisbane last month.

Nor have French authorities pressured French businesses to cut connections to Russia like Germany did, said Sergei Fyodorov of the Institute of Europe at the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Hollande's "ostpolitik" is reminiscent of that of his predecessor, Nicolas Sarkozy: 

There is a recent precedent for Hollande's attempts to play peacemaker with Russia: In 2008, his predecessor Nicolas Sarkozy brokered the end to the "five-day war" between Russia and Georgia over the breakaway province of South Ossetia.

Right. And we all know how well that turned out. Just ask the Georgians.

Read the whole piece here.

09:47 December 09, 2014

TWITTER CAMPAIGN AGAINST RUSSIAN SOPRANO ANNA NETREBKO

Anna Netrebko's decision to donate 1 million rubles to a theater in rebel-held eastern Ukraine, and her posing with a Novorossia rebel flag, has sparked a Twitter campaign under the hashtag #BoycottAnnaNetrebko.

Here are some choice tweets:

09:31 December 09, 2014

DID PUTIN TONE DOWN HIS BIG SPEECH?

Simon Shuster has a new piece up at Time suggesting he did, based on a draft copy of the speech prepared by the Kremlin leader's speechwriters.

Russian President Vladimir Putin apparently cut out a blistering critique of Ukrainian authorities in a speech to human-rights advocates last week, as he seeks to carve out a peace deal with his country’s neighbor. 

In a draft prepared by Putin’s speechwriters and obtained by TIME, the President was set to accuse Ukrainian authorities of the “mass destruction of their own citizens” during their ongoing conflict with Moscow-backed separatist rebels. But at the last moment, Putin appears to have dropped that line.

Read the whole piece here.

 

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The Power Vertical is a blog written especially for Russia wonks and obsessive Kremlin watchers by Brian Whitmore. It covers emerging and developing trends in Russian politics, shining a spotlight on the high-stakes power struggles, machinations, and clashing interests that shape Kremlin policy today. Check out The Power Vertical Facebook page or