Saturday, August 23, 2014


Persian Letters

'Free Pussy Riot' Graffiti In Iran?

There have been protests and calls on Russia to free jailed members of the Russian feminist punk group Pussy Riot from many corners of the world. The three were sentenced to two years in prison earlier this week over their critical remarks against Russian President Vladimir Putin.

At least one appeal has also been made in Iran, if the author of a photograph creating a buzz among Iranians is to be believed, in the form of graffiti at the gate of the Russian consulate in Isfahan.

Persian Letters could not verify the image's authenticity.

But this picture of a protest sign is making the rounds on social media among Iranians and opposition members who have been critical of Russian support for the Iranian establishment.

-- Golnaz Esfandiari
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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Eugenio from: Vienna
August 25, 2012 13:33
I suggest that the govt of Iran give the members of the "Pussy Riot" rock-band political asylum and settle them in the province of Khorassan where they will for sure find a lot of followers :-))). I see that Golnaz Esfandiari never gets tired of contributing to the satirical section of this web-site :-))).

by: Maryam
August 25, 2012 15:57
Kuddos to the brave Iranians.
In Response

by: john from: america
August 26, 2012 19:44
pussy riot's performance was not hooliganism motivated by religious hatred or hostility" it was merely a political protest. they're too young to have such a sentence of such severity. that law doesn't make sense to me.
In Response

by: rick
August 26, 2012 21:31
aren't important motivation
what is important are acts

by: asdf
August 28, 2012 06:15
the person who tagged that door probably reads this site ...
In Response

by: Eugenio from: Vienna
August 28, 2012 13:20
...or maybe Golnaz tagged the door herself, who knows :-)...

About This Blog

Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.

Guerrilla Translators

Seen anything in the Iranian blogosphere that you think Persian Letters should cover? If so, contact Golnaz Esfandiari at esfandiarig@rferl.org