Sunday, December 21, 2014


Persian Letters

Who Is Iran's New First Lady?

Alone again: President-elect Hassan Rohani
Alone again: President-elect Hassan Rohani
Who is Iran's new first lady? The answer is, we don't know. She made no reported campaign appearances alongside her husband and doesn't appear to have been known in public before the election.

The wives of Iranian politicians are often nearly invisible. They rarely appear in public and, usually, little about them is known.

In that sense, the wife of Iranian President-elect Hassan Rohani is no exception.

But what is unusual is that Iranian media don't even seem to know her name.

In the few reports that Iranian news agencies and websites have run about the presidential candidates' wives, she is always either missing or described merely as "the wife of Hassan Rohani."

There was even some basic information available about the wife of the most hard-line of the six candidates -- nuclear negotiator Said Jalili -- who was quoted as saying that a woman's main role in society is to be a mother.

Jalili's wife, who was identified as Fatemeh Sajadi, is a general physician, according to Iranian media reports.

No such public account exists of Rohani's wife.

"There is no information available" on her, as one news agency put it.

Another story noted that her name has seemingly never been mentioned in public. It said she doesn't participate in social or political activities and added, "She is a housewife and they were married in a traditional way."

Even the ISNA news agency hit a brick wall: "Despite all of our efforts to obtain more and precise information about her in order to understand her role in Hassan Rohani's life, we did not receive a positive response from his close aides and his campaign."

The best clue RFE/RL was able to uncover came from a journalist in Tehran, who said on condition of anonymity that Rohani's wife's maiden name was Arabi. A Twitter exchange with the Tehran reporter for "The New York Times" revealed that her first name was Sahebeh.

Until there is official confirmation, the world will have to get by with what little information has trickled in about the Rohanis.

ISNA quoted the 64-year-old Rohani as saying his family had chosen her for him. "I was about 20 years old. My father insisted, my mother as well," he said. "I wasn't very reluctant."

On June 19, an Iranian website quoted Rohani's 86-year-old mother as saying Rohani's wife was 14 years old when they married.

And there's one other key detail: Rohani and his wife are said to have four children and a son who died.

Outgoing President Mahmud Ahmadinejad's wife appeared in public with him a few times during his two-term presidency and was reported to have accompanied him on some of his travels abroad.

It's anyone's guess whether Mrs. Rohani will take on a public role after her husband assumes power.

-- Golnaz Esfandiari
This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: lpsk from: not important
June 20, 2013 12:30
BTW, the female age of consent is 14 or lower in Austria, Germany, Italy, and Spain. Not to mention in Albania, Bosnia/Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Estonia, Hungary, Liechtenstein, Macedonia, Montenegro, Portugal, San Marino, and the Vatican State.

Sauce: wikipedia.org/wiki/Ages_of_consent_in_Europe
Note that some of these countries set out limits on the age difference between the partners and/or include legal language excepting young people who haven't reached sexual maturity (presumably defined by the courts on a case-by-case basis).

by: Maryam from: Iran
June 23, 2013 02:22
Please write your articles in Farsi. These are important issues you raise. Why Farsi media are not asking these questions?

About This Blog

Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.

Guerrilla Translators

Seen anything in the Iranian blogosphere that you think Persian Letters should cover? If so, contact Golnaz Esfandiari at esfandiarig@rferl.org