Wednesday, April 23, 2014


Transmission

'Little Fish,' 'The Mole,' 'The Healer: What Yanukovych's Guards Dubbed Top Officials

The list of nicknames
The list of nicknames
TEXT SIZE - +
Among the treasure trove of Viktor Yanukovych-era documents currently being pored over by journalists and pro-Euromaidan activists is a list of nicknames the ousted Ukrainian president's security staff apparently gave to top officials and politicians.

The Russian-language list was posted online by the far-right youth group Right Sector.

Serhiy Arbuzov, then deputy prime minister, was dubbed "Little Fish." (Рыбка), while Andriy Klyuyev, latterly Yanukovych's chief of staff, got the JFK-style abbreviation "APK" (АПК).

Then Prosecutor-General Viktor Pshonka was 'Yekimov' (Екимов) and Oleksandr Yakimenko, head of the SBU security service, was dubbed "The Yakut." (Якут). Yakuts are a Turkic people indigenous to Russia's Far East.

Defense Minister Pavel Lebedev was "The Eagle" (Орел), while Vitaliy Zakharchenko, the interior minister reviled by the Euromaidan protesters for unleashing deadly force against them, earned the now ironic-sounding moniker "The Healer" (Знахарь).

VIktor Medvedchuk, the pro-Russian politician and businessman, was "Old Neighbor" (сосед старый), while then opposition leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk was known as "New Neighbor" (сосед молодой) -- an apparent reference to the fact Yatsenyuk and Yanukovych both lived in the village of Novy Petrivtsy not far from Kyiv.  (http://tabloid.pravda.com.ua/lounge/526fa34c8767f/

Ex-SBU chief Ihor Kalinin was "Kyivstar" (Киевстар), while Oleksandr Lavrinovich, a former justice minister, was "The Mole" (Крот).

Party of Regions deputy Serhiy Kivalov and Serhiy Larin, Klyuyev's no. 2, got the more enigmatic "Radio Eye" (Радиоглаз) and "05."

The least colorful were saved for the UDO state guard service that apparently came up with the list of sobriquets -- "Kyiv" for the UDO's chief, '"Kyiv1" for his deputy.

-- Kathleen Moore
This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Bill Webb from: Phoenix Arizona USA
February 26, 2014 15:06
Yanukovych and the Maiden protesters had a very delicate row to hoe, but the bull in the china shop tactics of both seems to have not filled the bill by leaving 80 dead. Parliament, minus the Party of Regions representatives seems to be the only legitimate governance remaining. Hosting Russia's Black Sea Fleet and an EU partnership aren't necessarily exclusive of one another. The details can be worked out. In step Merkel and Putin. Both speak German and Russian, and are eager to get the trade agreements worked out, a great deal for all the countries involved.

by: Mamuka
February 26, 2014 17:38
And all in Russian... in fact the head of UDO is not "Kyiv" but "Kiev" if you look on the linked website to see the rest of the list.

by: Konstantin from: Los Angeles
February 27, 2014 10:54
It is all doing of old and new expanding Russia - contingency.
They planned it all alone, trying to replicate the Lenin times:
Split Ukraine with Germans, than invade with vengeance,
Than crush Labor Unions as non-Bolshevik concepts,
Than unleash plunder and influx more Russians.

They repeating, for now with a smaller scale,
All they did then: armies of invading Georgia
An Caucasus bear same numbers, urgency -
Lying propaganda, under "West-threat" wale,
Partitioning and repopulating by influx-Russia.

The same road from Sochi, Abkhazia, Ossetia,
Crimea and Russian provocateurs, same partners,
British, German and Austrian Empire they promised
Peace of the action, the same dirty tricks to shaken-up
Ukraine, for valets to fall-out and for Russian army invade.

The answer is Unity of Ukraine Citizens - to build real nation,
Neither turn on West Ukrainians, nor on other groups. Action
Should be balanced, show that real Ukraine staying in charge
Of their country. Respond publicly to lies of Russia's in-surge.
Prove Ukraine is ready be independent, strong and to prosper.


About This Blog

Written by RFE/RL editors and correspondents, Transmission serves up news, comment, and the odd silly dictator story. While our primary concern is with foreign policy, Transmission is also a place for the ideas -- some serious, some irreverent -- that bubble up from our bureaus. The name recognizes RFE/RL's role as a surrogate broadcaster to places without free media. You can write us at transmission+rferl.org

Most Popular