Friday, July 25, 2014


Russia

Russian Supreme Court Says 'Neutral' Gay Information Is Legal

Russian police detain a gay-rights activist after several people gathered for a parade in Moscow in May.
Russian police detain a gay-rights activist after several people gathered for a parade in Moscow in May.
Russia's Supreme Court has ruled that a controversial ban on gay propaganda does not extend to public demonstrations and discussions of gay rights.

In an August 15 ruling posted on the court's website on September 14, the court upheld a regional ban on gay propaganda targeting minors, but said that providing minors with "general" and "neutral" information about gay rights did not fall under the ban.

The ruling follows an appeal by gay-rights activists of a recent ban by lawmakers in Russia's northwest Arkhangelsk Oblast of gay propaganda to minors.

Gay-rights groups have welcomed the ruling, which they say excludes gay-pride parades and other public events from being defined as homosexual propaganda.

The Arkhangelsk ban sparked similar legislation in a number of Russian cities, including St. Petersburg.

The Supreme Court is set to review the St. Petersburg case on October 3.

Based on reporting by Interfax, RIA Novosti, Newsland.ru, and Comingoutspb.ru

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