Tuesday, September 02, 2014


Transmission

Steven Seagal Praises Putin, FSB Ahead Of Sochi

American actor Steven Seagal (left) chats with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Sochi in August 2012.
American actor Steven Seagal (left) chats with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Sochi in August 2012.
A suicide bomber on the loose. Western governments warned of an imminent terrorist attack. Nearby U.S. warships on stand-by.

That was the grim security scenario laid out for next month's Sochi Winter Olympics by former Republican presidential hopeful Mike Huckabee on his Fox News talk show on January 26.

But martial-arts expert Steven Seagal knows better, apparently.

Speaking as Huckabee's guest on the conservative U.S. TV news station, the action-movie hero assessed the danger of an attack in Sochi as "extremely remote," citing his acquaintances in the Russian security forces.

Although he acknowledged that absolute security is impossible ("You could walk out to go buy a bag of sugar and get hit by a car" was how he put it), Seagal used the Fox News appearance to lavish praise on Russia's President Vladimir Putin and its Federal Security Service (FSB).

Seagal also urged U.S. President Barack Obama to pursue closer relations with Russia.

"They are a very powerful country with spectacular natural resources and a wonderful leadership," he said. "And, I believe that they are our friends and I think one of the only ways we are going to survive without getting swallowed by other superpowers or adversely affected is to be best friends with Russia. I think they should be our great allies."

On Sochi, Seagal reasoned that the colossal security presence in the region would prevail during the games.

"The chances of any of these suicide bombers actually being able to pull it off are extremely remote by virtue of the fact that Sochi is on such high alert," he said. "They've got amazing assets in place with great liaison over the world. President Putin is doing the very, very best he can. And, like I said, the FSB and [their elite counterterrorism taskforce] Alfa Spetsnaz are really some of the best on Earth, so it's going to be pretty tough for anybody to pull it off."

WATCH: Steven Seagal discusses Sochi security measures.

Huckabee introduced Seagal as "the unofficial ambassador who’s developed a friendly relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, something our president has not been able to do."

The comment appeared to be a jibe aimed at the cool relationship between Putin and Obama, who is one of several Western leaders skipping the Olympic opening ceremonies.

Seagal does indeed enjoy good relations with Russia. He has been photographed with Putin, and he was asked in March 2012 by Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin to lobby in the United States for opening up the U.S. market to Russian rifles.

The actor was also scheduled to lobby for Kalashnikov rifle sales at an arms exposition in Las Vegas earlier this month.

Seagal was less voluble, however, when asked about U.S. intelligence leaker Edward Snowden, who has been given temporary asylum in Russia.

Without knowing the actual content of the material Snowden leaked, Seagal said, "it's not easy for me to comment [on the matter]."

-- Tom Balmforth

Tags: Sochi Olympics

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by: Konstantin from: Los Angeles
January 28, 2014 22:08
Once "babushkas" and "dedushkas" move to USA,
Some ethnic Russians, some "russified", up to date,
Than "mamas" and "papas" followed, similar quorum,
Prizing Russians proxies think-tanks, press and forums,
Than new waves, sometimes to visit Russia for decorum.

I am not against cohabitation of USA-Russia, and for peace.
But Sochi, annexed by Lenin, was Georgia and Cherkessia,
Next to being annexed Abkhazia-Ossetia, Russian squeeze.
Even Hitler's Olympics wasn't in invaded Prague, "Chehia".
Is Obama OK to annex Georgia-Caucasus, Putin to please?

Some juicy movie makers, instigating USA "shpionomania",
Precedent for Russia forge on innocent "shpionoubivaniya",
Like all this "Glassners" and Seagals and president Obama,
Possibly told that Ivan saved from Nazis his "grandmamma",
As some actors hanged for paying less to OBHS "programa".

Sure, it is difficult for emigrants from USSR-Russia to decline,
Being forced to sign once to Russia pledge - lie for evil swine,
Prize Russia and smear non-Russian nations, Like Georgians,
Stalin, who saved Obama's "grandmamma", or like Ukrainians
And CIS. I refused to sign, they killing me and killed my mama.
In Response

by: Ken from: Australia
January 28, 2014 23:41
Say what ?
In Response

by: Konstantin from: Los Angeles
January 30, 2014 07:47
1.
Well, it probably got on your nerve, Ken - (not just a Kent,
As probably would call civilian like me a Russian "ment").
"So what" for you - to prize your masters and be alive.
As for my mother - bestially killed, already in a grave.
2.
Thanks, Stephen, not a poem, just a truncated,
From redundancy, truth - to understand by illiterated,
Not necessary by most of negative repliers - they just hated.
3.
Mudd, don't muddy what you hate, if it is truth.
I used "Putin to please" above, to catch you Russ.
4.
Another "Tone-Dog" from Russia, calling it "Earth",
Presuming Russia conquered it already by its force.
"Force" is pathologic lies. Truth would spoil his "borsh".
5.
It is believable "Gogol", you can be smart enough for both,
If you are, at least in part, "Mongol", not just Varag-"borsh".
Sure you see "sense", as your Ivan - handler-"nachal'nik",
If you just a civilian guy - what broke your "molchal'nik"?
In Response

by: Stephen from: Australia
January 28, 2014 23:53
Konstantin, I enjoyed your clever comments in the form of a poem illuminating and entertaining, I found them very helpful. What a pleasant change from the usual illiterate bloggers.
In Response

by: S. Mudd from: Cali
January 28, 2014 23:56
May I be the first to say to the comment above....WhoooooooWhaaaaaatttttt!!!!!!!

Please to learn english. [sic]
In Response

by: Tonedoga from: Earth
January 29, 2014 00:58
Huh?
In Response

by: Gogol from: Los Angeles
January 29, 2014 01:25
What are you saying, man?!.. I speak both: English and Russian but what you wrote does not make much sense on any of these languages... Try again, may be?..
In Response

by: Nikolai from: London
February 02, 2014 23:45
Lenin had nothing to do with "annexing" Sochi. It was part of the Russian Empire long before him.
Georgia joined the Russian Empire voluntarily to escape opression by the Persians and the Ottomans.
As for the indigenous inhabitants of the Olympic sites, whatever happened to the natives of Squaw Valley, Ca., Lake Placid, N.Y. or Salt Lake City, Ut.? Or Vancouver, B.C.?

by: Lin B from: California
January 29, 2014 00:02
Steven Segall, Dennis Rodman, why do actors think they have the knowledge to get involved in politics? The Russian and Korean leaders are both evil dictators. I wouldn't go near either country if you paid me.

by: Guildenstern
January 29, 2014 00:42
And with that, Steven Seagal became more completely irrelevant. If that's possible.

by: QtheCurtain from: Alabama
January 29, 2014 01:31
First Rodman with Kim and now Seagal with Putin. Two has-been lunatics and the men they love.

by: Directionally Gifted
January 29, 2014 01:47
"Right", the new left. I think Seagal would be a great Russian President

by: Bob Guelda, Sr. from: Georgetown, Ky.
January 29, 2014 01:58
And in what way does this differ with Dennis Rodman?

by: DB from: Minneapolis
January 29, 2014 02:15
A washed up politician turned dictator and a washed up 'actor' turned flunky. How quaint. Putin is just a loose screw shy of that nut job in north Korea.

by: Matt from: TX
January 29, 2014 02:54
what?

by: Anonymous
January 29, 2014 04:44
It figures someone who killed a puppy with a tank would love Putin.

by: Eugenio from: Vienna
January 29, 2014 10:12
Well, it's just normal: while such NATO states as the US or France are in a state of irreversible decay, their citizens start escaping from this "capitalist paradize": Gérard Depardieu or Edward Snowden to Russia, Dennis Rodman to the DPRK. Let alone thousands of those poor Spaniards or Portugese who have to abandon their native countries in order to go to look for work in Brasil or in Angola.
So, the guy pictured above together with Putin is only one more of those who - quite logically - prefer to abandon a sinking ship.
In Response

by: Solidus from: Kabul
January 29, 2014 17:14
You say Rodman went to the DPRK because he wanted to leave a "decaying" United Sates. I would even abandon Afghanistan to go to North Korea. Also, "capitalist paradi[s]e"? The Cold War is over, Mr. Nastalgia. Do you honestly think any of the Oligarchs (including Putin) who run the Duma are interested in Marxism-Leninism after the wealth they've recieved post 1991? We need to stop looking at the past and understand the future. We need to stop pretending that any of these leaders operate under non-capitalist ideals. It is only about the money and will always be about that. Materialists don't understand immaterial value and in Marxist ideology, nothing is immaterial.
In Response

by: Nomoremaos from: USA
January 29, 2014 17:46
Would hardly consider the US a sinking ship. But the country you are from - most likely the case long ago.
In Response

by: Eugenio from: Vienna
January 30, 2014 11:16
To Nomoremaos: If the US is not sinking ship, how do you explain (a) the emergence of such individuals as Bradley Manning or Edward Snowden? 10-15 years ago you did not have them; (b) the ever greater number of US cities going bankrupt - Detroit being only the latest case; (c) the fact that the US is suffering one humiliating defeat abroad after the other: Iraq, Afghanistan, and the latest case Syria that demonstrated the extent to which the US is absolutely unable even to start any sort of military action abroad, let alone complete it successfully.
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Written by RFE/RL editors and correspondents, Transmission serves up news, comment, and the odd silly dictator story. While our primary concern is with foreign policy, Transmission is also a place for the ideas -- some serious, some irreverent -- that bubble up from our bureaus. The name recognizes RFE/RL's role as a surrogate broadcaster to places without free media. You can write us at transmission+rferl.org

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