Saturday, October 25, 2014


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Clapper Says French Reports On Spying Inaccurate

U.S. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifying before the House Select Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington in AprilU.S. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifying before the House Select Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington in April
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U.S. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifying before the House Select Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington in April
U.S. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifying before the House Select Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington in April

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The U.S. intelligence chief has said that reports in the French newspaper "Le Monde" about America's espionage activities abroad contain inaccurate and misleading information.

James Clapper, the U.S. director of national intelligence, said in a statement on October 22 that the "allegation that the National Security Agency collected more than 70 million 'recordings of French citizens' telephone data' is false."

He said the United States "gathers intelligence of the type gathered by all nations...to protect the nation, its interests and its allies."

Meanwhile, Mexico said it will investigate allegations that the United States spied on the e-mails of President Enrique Pena Nieto and his predecessor, Felipe Calderon.

Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Meade said he would summon the U.S. ambassador over the issue and called Washington's response so far "unacceptable."

Based on reporting by AFP and AP

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