Stalin's Soviet Union comes to life in full color with the discovery of a long-hidden collection of images.

By Mike Eckel, Wojtek Grojec, and Amos Chapple

Attaché With A View

Major Martin Manhoff spent more than two years in the Soviet Union in the early 1950s, serving as assistant army attaché at the U.S. Embassy, which was located just off Red Square at the beginning of his time in Moscow.

He took full advantage of his post, using his gifted photographic eye to capture hundreds of images of everyday life in Moscow and across the U.S.S.R.

When he left the country in 1954 amid accusations of espionage, Major Manhoff took with him reels of 16 millimeter film and hundreds of color slides and negatives he shot during his travels – including of one of the Soviet Union's pivotal events, Josef Stalin's funeral.

But after his return to the United States, the trove of rare images lay forgotten, stored in cardboard boxes in a former auto body shop in the Pacific Northwest until its discovery by a Seattle-based historian.

The Manhoff Archive of color slides and negatives, 16mm footage, and personal notes and correspondence is divided into four parts.

Part Three

On The Road

Coming April 3

Epilogue

Spy Or Artist?

Coming April 10