Tuesday, September 02, 2014


Persian Letters

'Khamenei Sat Here' -- Mountain Shrine Erected 'To Supreme Leader's Bottom'

A sign marks the spot where Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei sat on this rock in 2005 while taking a rest from trekking a mountain in Kerman.
A sign marks the spot where Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei sat on this rock in 2005 while taking a rest from trekking a mountain in Kerman.
The rock on which Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei sat on in 2005 while taking a rest from trekking a mountain in Kerman has been memorialized with a sign bearing his image, according to a picture shared by Iranian bloggers. 

The rock and its sign have been described by critics as “a pilgrimage site for Khamenei’s bottom.” The sign says Khamenei gracefully perched on the spot and gives the exact date -- May 6, 2005. 

It is not clear whether the sign was set up immediately after his visit to Kerman or later.

We have reported before in "Persian Letters" about similar attempts by Khamenei’s supporters to elevate his religious status and portray him as a saintlike figure.

Last year, a video was making the rounds in which Qom’s Friday Prayers leader claimed that shortly before being born Khamenei had called the name of the first imam of the Shi'a.
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by: Chuck Hamilton from: Chattanooga, TN USA
May 01, 2012 14:53
Next they will be claiming that he walked upright out of his mother's womb on a carpet of lotus flowers.
In Response

by: Alidad from: Spain
May 01, 2012 17:54
Amusing, but is this the claim made about the murderer Mao? Because these people have much in common with the communists, from their hatred of society to their love of leaders etc.. They are alternately comical, sinister or detestable; this piece of news would be amusing, if it were amusing.

by: Nathan from: USA
May 02, 2012 05:41
I'm waiting for the Holy Public Toilet.

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Persian Letters is a blog that offers a window into Iranian politics and society. Written primarily by Golnaz Esfandiari, Persian Letters brings you under-reported stories, insight and analysis, as well as guest Iranian bloggers -- from clerics, anarchists, feminists, Basij members, to bus drivers.

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