Monday, December 22, 2014


Russia

Media Frenzy Over Pussy Riot Obscures Legal Plights Of Lesser-Known Protesters

One of the some 400 people detained by police during an antigovernment protest rally in Moscow on May 6
One of the some 400 people detained by police during an antigovernment protest rally in Moscow on May 6

Related Articles

Madonna Protests Pussy Riot Detention At Moscow Concert

During a Moscow concert, pop star Madonna called on the Russian authorities to respect "the right to freedom of expression" and release three jailed members of the feminist punk rock group Pussy Riot.

Multimedia

By Kristina Gorelik
With the eyes of Russia-watchers trained on Pussy Riot, the feminist punk performance-art group whose now-famous trio is bracing for a verdict over their iconoclastic performance at a Moscow cathedral, the plight of Artyom Savyolov has drawn little attention.

Savyolov and at least 11 other young Russians could face stiff prison sentences for taking part in a sanctioned antigovernment protest in Moscow that erupted into clashes between police and demonstrators.

More than 400 people were detained at the May 6 rally, which took place on the eve of the inauguration of Vladimir Putin for a third term as president.

Sixteen of the demonstrators remain in custody and at least 12 of them, including Savyolov, have been charged with calling for mass disorder and assaulting police officers. They could each face up to 10 years in prison if convicted.

Relatives and friends of the defendants have been actively seeking their release. Artyom Savyolov's father, Viktor, and other relatives say they are forming a committee to assist their defense.

"I will oversee the actions of relatives and friends of those detained and appeal to various instances," Viktor Savyolov said. "We need to work. We need to get my son and the others out of there. We need to stand together."

While some of those detained are opposition activists, others, like Artyom Savyolov, appear to be people with no links to political, environmental, or rights groups.

Investigators have said they are continuing to track down other individuals suspected of disruptive behavior on May 6.
Investigators have said they are continuing to track down other individuals suspected of disruptive behavior on May 6.
This has raised suspicions that their legal woes are intended as a warning sign to Russians to stay off the streets.

Viktor Savyolov describes his son, a former subway worker in his early 30s, as peaceful by nature and says the May 6 event was the first rally he had ever attended. He says his son could not physically have shouted slogans.

"My son has a disability. He has stuttered since he was a child. How could he possibly be guilty of propaganda when he can pronounce the words 'thank you' only on the fourth attempt?" he says. "He is charged with spreading propaganda and shouting out slogans."

Two of the 16 detainees, leftist activist Nikolai Kavkazsky and Moscow student Aleksei Polikhovich, were detained in late July, signaling there could be more arrests.

Investigators have said they are continuing to track down other individuals suspected of disruptive behavior on May 6.

Kavkazsky's mother, Natalya Kavkazskaya, says she fears for her son's future.

"Trust me, this is all very hard," she says. "This is a very difficult and frightening situation, when young people are in jail for attending a rally that was authorized by the government."
This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Goirdon Ball from: Ottawa Canada
August 15, 2012 14:59
I can understand why the youth of Russia wants change. Could there be a better way to bring about change than confrontation with the existing goverment?
In Response

by: Ryan
August 18, 2012 02:58
lol. radio liberty. I can't believe that this old CIA joint still exists.

by: ilios ellas from: CANADA
August 23, 2012 15:00
I can understand the plight of the "Pussies" but let's get our priorities straight. Julian Assange is fighting for the freedom of the press and freedom of us to expose wrongdoings by governments everywhere; there should be a BIGGER cry for his rightas and ours:
Please help promote this link wherever you can; if you believe in freedom of expression and freedom of the press. Julian

Assange for the Nobel prize for freedom of the press:

www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Julian_Assange_for_Nobel_prize_Freedom_of_the_Press/

Lets see how "Noble" the Norwegians and their righteous Swede neighbors are or claim to be, since they offered Obama the Nobel peace prize!
In Response

by: Andrew from: Auckland
August 29, 2012 18:47
Wrong Canuk, Assange is a narcissistic hypocrite who wants all information on everyone made public, except for himself of course, he is a self obsessed scumbag who appears to have forced two women to have sex with him on separate occasions.

If he has nothing to hide, why did he flee to the embassy of a nation that has an appalling human rights record, and whose current President severely restricts press freedoms?

by: Ilija Prentovski from: Macedonia
August 24, 2012 13:49
If you pretend to be serious journalists, please double-check your sources first. Maybe if you look at the wider context, you will eventually get the whole picture: http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=32442
In Response

by: Mike from: Portland
August 29, 2012 17:36
I like your comment about "pretend journalists" and then you send the link to the trusted globalresearch.ca site.
Nice what the Wikipedia article on teh founder of that site says, "the op-ed criticized GlobalResearch.ca as "anti-U.S. and anti-globalization" and criticized Chussodovsky's "wild-eyed conspiracy theories" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Chossudovsky
In Response

by: Ilija Prentovski from: Macedonia
August 29, 2012 22:19
Mike, thank you for your reply. Please let me clarify a few things.

I use the information available on Wikipedia daily. But that's what it is - information - no more, no less. There is no editor's opinion involved. Opinions come from other people, and are carefully sourced in the 'References' section. They are not laws of nature, only people's opinions. Now, people often make mistakes. If one wants to know the truth, he/she needs to do some research.

GlobalResearch.ca is not Chossudovsky's private club, only a hub for opinions of numerous researchers. Several hundreds of them, actually, and they come from all walks of life. I don't agree with all of them, of course. I have neither the time nor the inclination to read everything they say. However, the substantial number of articles that I have read over the years, and compared to sources other than GR, do reflect the truth. Especially those concerning my country and the Balkan region in general.

The same Wikipedia article also says that "Chossudovsky has also been criticised as an 'apologist for the Milošević regime', and for systematically distorting events in Albania and the wars in the Balkans in the 1990." What distortion?! It happened exactly as the man said. I live here for 46 years and I have experienced it first hand. Miloshevich was no angel, but he was a puppy compared to US/NATO war-mongers.

The pattern is very simple and it has been used for centuries across the globe. The US has merely perfected it. First you hire thugs and mercenaries to initiate conflict between opposing factions/nationalities/religious groups etc. Then you let them kill each other and bring the country to its knees, by financing and supplying both sides. Indirectly, of course, because in the grand finale you need to be the good guy who settles the dispute. The settlement is usually accompanied by redrawing borders and splitting the country into several pieces, each one more pathetic than the next, which makes them perfect voters for US interests in the UN General Assembly. And on top of that, you also collect interest on the financing during the war. So, whoever "wins" the war, is actually a loser to the private interests of big financial capital.

I hope this sheds some light on the issue of meddling in Russia's internal affairs.

Yours truly,
Ilija

Most Popular