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Top U.S. Military Officer In Afghan Visit As Insider Toll Mounts

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (right) and the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey (left)U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (right) and the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey (left)
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U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (right) and the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey (left)
U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (right) and the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey (left)
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The chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, has arrived in Afghanistan to hold talks with senior commanders.
 

The visit comes amid a rise of attacks in which apparent Afghan security forces have turned their guns on coalition troops, killing 10 of them in less than two weeks.
 

The latest such attack occurred in the southern province of Kandahar on August 19, when a man in an Afghan police uniform shot and killed an international service member.
 

Before landing at the U.S. air base in Bagram, Dempsey said the spike in attacks by members of the Afghan security forces on their NATO counterparts would be a topic of his meetings with U.S.-led coalition and Afghan officers.
 

Dempsey told AFP news agency and Fox News television that he welcomed President Hamid Karzai's recent statements on the problem, saying he hoped similar comments would be made by lower-ranking officials.
 

"We speak about it and we're taking measures to mitigate the risk, Dempsey added. But I do think the more they can be as concerned about it as we are, the better off we'll all be."
 

NATO has some 130,000 troops in Afghanistan who are due to pull out in 2014. The general said the insider violence would not alter the timetable for withdrawal.
 

On August 18, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta urged Karzai to bolster cooperation with NATO forces to contain the insider threat.
 

A statement by the Pentagon said measures should include improved intelligence and more rigorous vetting of Afghan recruits.
 

This year's toll from insider attacks by Afghans on coalition troops reached 40.
 

Some of the attacks have been claimed by the Taliban who say they have infiltrated Afghan security forces.
 

Based on reporting by AFP anf Fox News
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by: William from: Aragon
August 19, 2012 23:48
"...apparent Afghan security forces have turned their guns on coalition troops, killing 10 of them in less than two weeks." Did the US military not think that some of the recruits they took in many years ago worked for the insurgency? Did they not realise that they have been training insurgents about US weapons and tactics? Did they not realise that some of these early recruits have now reached senior positions in the military and are waiting for when ISAF withdraws? Have they not leaned from the Vietnam experience over 40 years ago?

by: Bill Webb from: Phoenix Arizona USA
August 20, 2012 04:11
These highly publicized attacks pale in comparson to 130,000 NATO troops in Afghanistan. The US support in not going to go away in 2014. These young criminals being supported by Mullah Omar face certain defeat as does the anti-female agenda by muslim men worldwide.
In Response

by: Jack from: US
August 20, 2012 17:45
you are in full agreement with Hillary Clinton who thinks the more of NATO minions die the better for humanity. Indeed, NATO should stay firm in Afghanistan, and train more peaceful Wahhabi Sunni activists, and get more NATO minions dispatched to Allah. Peaceful Wahhabi Sunni activists helped liberate World Trace Center from infidels in 9/11. Peaceful Wahhabi Sunni activists are fighting for Allah in Syria, Kosovo, Bosnia, Chechnya and elsewhere. US government and personally Hillary Clinton fully support and approve of peaceful Wahhabi Sunni activists

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