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'Novaya Gazeta' -- Still Going Strong After 20 Years

Best known for its investigative reports on corruption and rights abuses, Russia’s “Novaya gazeta” newspaper turned 20 on April 1. In a country ranking as one of the world’s most dangerous places for journalists, its reporting has earned international accolades but has also put its reporters in considerable danger.

'Novaya Gazeta' employees at the newspaper's Moscow office (RIA Novosti/Sergey Mamontov)
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'Novaya Gazeta' employees at the newspaper's Moscow office (RIA Novosti/Sergey Mamontov)

In its two decades of existence, the newspaper's commitment to investigative reporting has seen it break a number of controversial stories that have attracted the ire of the Kremlin and other powerful members of Russia's elite. (RIA Novosti/Vladimir Vyatkin)
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In its two decades of existence, the newspaper's commitment to investigative reporting has seen it break a number of controversial stories that have attracted the ire of the Kremlin and other powerful members of Russia's elite. (RIA Novosti/Vladimir Vyatkin)

Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev (left) and businessman Aleksandr Lebedev (right) together hold a 49 percent stake in the newspaper, with the publication's staff owning the remaining 51 percent. (ITAR-TASS/Vitaly Belousov)
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Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev (left) and businessman Aleksandr Lebedev (right) together hold a 49 percent stake in the newspaper, with the publication's staff owning the remaining 51 percent. (ITAR-TASS/Vitaly Belousov)

Portraits of 'Novaya Gazeta' newspaper correspondents and collaborators who died on assignments are displayed at the publication's office. From left: Natalia Estemirova, Stanislav Markelov, Anastasia Baburova, Igor Domnikov, Yury Schekochikhin, and Anna Politkovskaya. (RIA Novosti/Sergey Mamontov)
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Portraits of 'Novaya Gazeta' newspaper correspondents and collaborators who died on assignments are displayed at the publication's office. From left: Natalia Estemirova, Stanislav Markelov, Anastasia Baburova, Igor Domnikov, Yury Schekochikhin, and Anna Politkovskaya. (RIA Novosti/Sergey Mamontov)

'Novaya gazeta' investigative reporter Anna Politkovskaya was found shot dead in the elevator of her apartment block in central Moscow in October 2006. (ITAR-TASS)
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'Novaya gazeta' investigative reporter Anna Politkovskaya was found shot dead in the elevator of her apartment block in central Moscow in October 2006. (ITAR-TASS)

'Novaya gazeta' editor Yuri Shchekochikhin died in 2003 of a mysterious illness that was widely suspected to be the result of radioactive poisoning. (AFP/Tim Sloan)
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'Novaya gazeta' editor Yuri Shchekochikhin died in 2003 of a mysterious illness that was widely suspected to be the result of radioactive poisoning. (AFP/Tim Sloan)

The award-winning journalist and human rights activist Natalia Estemirova was abducted in Grozny in July 2009 and was found shot dead some hours later. At the time, she was said to have been working on "extremely sensitive" cases of human rights abuses in Chechnya. (Reuters/Dylan Martinez)
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The award-winning journalist and human rights activist Natalia Estemirova was abducted in Grozny in July 2009 and was found shot dead some hours later. At the time, she was said to have been working on "extremely sensitive" cases of human rights abuses in Chechnya. (Reuters/Dylan Martinez)

Russian human-rights lawyer Stanislav Markelov (right) and 'Novaya Gazeta' reporter Anastasia Baburova (left) were both shot dead in January 2009 as they left a news conference in Moscow. (AFP)
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Russian human-rights lawyer Stanislav Markelov (right) and 'Novaya Gazeta' reporter Anastasia Baburova (left) were both shot dead in January 2009 as they left a news conference in Moscow. (AFP)

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