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Moscow's Iconic Shukhov Tower Faces Dismantling

Some of the world’s leading architects have petitioned Russian President Vladimir Putin to save Moscow's iconic Shukhov Radio Tower from destruction. In February 2014, the Federal Ministry of Communications agreed to the dismantling of the work of early Soviet constructivism with the hope of reconstructing it elsewhere -- but a final decision by Russian authorities is expected by March 24.

The Shukhov Radio Tower stands 160 meters tall at Shabolovka 37 -- a Moscow address that became synonymous with the Soviet Radio and Television Broadcasting Center.
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The Shukhov Radio Tower stands 160 meters tall at Shabolovka 37 -- a Moscow address that became synonymous with the Soviet Radio and Television Broadcasting Center.

Engineer Vladimir Shukhov, who designed the tower in 1919, was confident that his innovative steelwork could build a 360-meter structure, taller than the Eiffel Tower -- a design that was abandoned due to material shortages.
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Engineer Vladimir Shukhov, who designed the tower in 1919, was confident that his innovative steelwork could build a 360-meter structure, taller than the Eiffel Tower -- a design that was abandoned due to material shortages.

Completed in 1922, the hyperboloid structure has since served as a landmark of modernist architecture.
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Completed in 1922, the hyperboloid structure has since served as a landmark of modernist architecture.

A postage stamp marking 50 years of Radio Moscow displays the Shukhov Tower.
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A postage stamp marking 50 years of Radio Moscow displays the Shukhov Tower.

Famed British architect Norman Foster one described the Shukhov Radio Tower as "a structure of dazzling brilliance and great historical importance."
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Famed British architect Norman Foster one described the Shukhov Radio Tower as "a structure of dazzling brilliance and great historical importance."

According to Russia’s Federal Ministry of Communications and Mass Media, the aging tower has fallen into irrevocable disrepair and should be dismantled to be put back together at a future date.
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According to Russia’s Federal Ministry of Communications and Mass Media, the aging tower has fallen into irrevocable disrepair and should be dismantled to be put back together at a future date.

The architect’s great-grandson, also named Vladimir Shukhov, has led a campaign to offer an alternative method of restoration that would reinforce the tower's points of structural weakness without tearing it down.
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The architect’s great-grandson, also named Vladimir Shukhov, has led a campaign to offer an alternative method of restoration that would reinforce the tower's points of structural weakness without tearing it down.

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