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How The World Commemorates The Victims Of 9/11

In the 15 years since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the former site of the World Trade Center in New York has been transformed into a place of remembrance. But there are other, lesser-known memorials devoted to the nearly 3,000 people who died in the attacks. The United Kingdom, Israel, and Italy all host their own memorials, and Russia has donated a commemorative artwork to the United States.

A sculpture of an American flag stands in the 9/11 Living Memorial Plaza near Motza, Israel, west of Jerusalem. The names of the victims, including five Israeli citizens, are written on the base. 
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A sculpture of an American flag stands in the 9/11 Living Memorial Plaza near Motza, Israel, west of Jerusalem. The names of the victims, including five Israeli citizens, are written on the base. 

U.S. artist Miya Ando poses in London next to her work, After 9/11, made from steel recovered from the World Trade Center. The sculpture was moved from its temporary location in Battersea Park to London's Olympic Park after a long delay in designating a permanent home. It was a gift from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to the United Kingdom. 
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U.S. artist Miya Ando poses in London next to her work, After 9/11, made from steel recovered from the World Trade Center. The sculpture was moved from its temporary location in Battersea Park to London's Olympic Park after a long delay in designating a permanent home. It was a gift from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to the United Kingdom. 

A sculpture by Georgian-Russian artist Zurab Tsereteli, titled To The Struggle Against World Terrorism, stands in Bayonne, New Jersey, near lower Manhattan. The 30-meter-tall work was given to the United States as an official gift of the Russian government in September 2006.
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A sculpture by Georgian-Russian artist Zurab Tsereteli, titled To The Struggle Against World Terrorism, stands in Bayonne, New Jersey, near lower Manhattan. The 30-meter-tall work was given to the United States as an official gift of the Russian government in September 2006.

Children release white doves in front of a monument to the victims of terrorism in Kyiv, Ukraine, on September 11, 2014. The monument, unveiled in 2005, is inscribed with the commandment "Thou shalt not kill" in 120 languages.
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Children release white doves in front of a monument to the victims of terrorism in Kyiv, Ukraine, on September 11, 2014. The monument, unveiled in 2005, is inscribed with the commandment "Thou shalt not kill" in 120 languages.

A sculpture of the Twin Towers in Copenhagen, Denmark...
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A sculpture of the Twin Towers in Copenhagen, Denmark...

...and a similar memorial in Ireland's Donadea Forest Park. This work is dedicated to firefighter Sean Tallon, whose family had emigrated from Donadea, and to other emergency workers and public servants who died in the attacks. 
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...and a similar memorial in Ireland's Donadea Forest Park. This work is dedicated to firefighter Sean Tallon, whose family had emigrated from Donadea, and to other emergency workers and public servants who died in the attacks. 

A memorial to the victims of the attacks in Kielce, Poland, is titled Homo Homini, Latin for “Man to Man.” The names of other major terrorist attacks of the past 15 years are inscribed on the monument representing the Twin Towers.
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A memorial to the victims of the attacks in Kielce, Poland, is titled Homo Homini, Latin for “Man to Man.” The names of other major terrorist attacks of the past 15 years are inscribed on the monument representing the Twin Towers.

This memorial, named Memoria e Luce (Memory and Light), was a gift from the United States to the Italian city of Padua. The shape suggests an open book. The structure was designed by architect Daniel Libeskind, one of the planners of the redeveloped site of the World Trade Center in New York.   
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This memorial, named Memoria e Luce (Memory and Light), was a gift from the United States to the Italian city of Padua. The shape suggests an open book. The structure was designed by architect Daniel Libeskind, one of the planners of the redeveloped site of the World Trade Center in New York. 
 

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