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That Old Car Smell: Soviet Motor Nostalgia


A Zaporozhets that once belonged to Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. The Zaporozhets was a compact car made in a factory in Ukraine and was nicknamed the "hunchback" for its distinctive shape.
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A Zaporozhets that once belonged to Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. The Zaporozhets was a compact car made in a factory in Ukraine and was nicknamed the "hunchback" for its distinctive shape.

A Pobeda (GAZ 20). The Pobeda, which means "victory" in Russian, came off the line in 1946, just over a year after the end of World War II. More than 200,000 were eventually made.
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A Pobeda (GAZ 20). The Pobeda, which means "victory" in Russian, came off the line in 1946, just over a year after the end of World War II. More than 200,000 were eventually made.

A Moskvich 401 from 1956. The car was based on the Opel Kadett. Soviet troops took the Opel factory apart and transported it to the Soviet Union after World War II. More than 240,000 of these were made.
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A Moskvich 401 from 1956. The car was based on the Opel Kadett. Soviet troops took the Opel factory apart and transported it to the Soviet Union after World War II. More than 240,000 of these were made.

A Moskvich 407 from 1969. More than 80,000 were made.
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A Moskvich 407 from 1969. More than 80,000 were made.

A ZiS 110, a Soviet limousine built at the Zavod imeni Stalina. Stalin was a big fan of American cars and the Packard 180s were used as models for this car.
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A ZiS 110, a Soviet limousine built at the Zavod imeni Stalina. Stalin was a big fan of American cars and the Packard 180s were used as models for this car.

A ZIM (GAZ-12) from 1953. It was manufactured between 1950 and 1960 and weighed more than two tons. (All photos by Kevin O'Flynn)
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A ZIM (GAZ-12) from 1953. It was manufactured between 1950 and 1960 and weighed more than two tons. (All photos by Kevin O'Flynn)

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