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Eastward Ho! Soviet Propaganda Aimed At The Non-Russian Proletariat

As these posters illustrate, Moscow put quite a lot of effort into preaching the Soviet gospel to non-Russian citizens in its eastern regions and the Caucasus during the early years of the U.S.S.R. (9 PHOTOS)

A 1920 poster written in Russian, Georgian, Armenian, Azeri, and Kumyk (Arabic script) calls on the peoples of the Caucasus to fall in with the Soviet cause. (Artist: D. Moor)
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A 1920 poster written in Russian, Georgian, Armenian, Azeri, and Kumyk (Arabic script) calls on the peoples of the Caucasus to fall in with the Soviet cause. (Artist: D. Moor)

A poster in Azeri and Russian celebrates the Baku proletariat's socialist struggle in the year's 1917-27.
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A poster in Azeri and Russian celebrates the Baku proletariat's socialist struggle in the year's 1917-27.

A 1934 poster written in Russian and Uzbek encourages workers and collective farmers to join millions of others in opening an account and depositing their savings in the state bank. (Artist: Mikhail Reykh)
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A 1934 poster written in Russian and Uzbek encourages workers and collective farmers to join millions of others in opening an account and depositing their savings in the state bank. (Artist: Mikhail Reykh)

A public information poster in Russian and Uzbek (Latin script) from 1933 reads, "There Are No Bad Collective Farms, Only Bad Managers." (Artist: V. Yeremyan)
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A public information poster in Russian and Uzbek (Latin script) from 1933 reads, "There Are No Bad Collective Farms, Only Bad Managers." (Artist: V. Yeremyan)

A 1933 poster in Russian and Uzbek urging agricultural workers to look after their horses despite the complete mechanization of collective farms. The poster warns that a horse is still needed for working on soft ground where wheeled tractors are liable to get bogged down. (Artist: Usto-Mumin [Aleksandr Nikolayev])
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A 1933 poster in Russian and Uzbek urging agricultural workers to look after their horses despite the complete mechanization of collective farms. The poster warns that a horse is still needed for working on soft ground where wheeled tractors are liable to get bogged down. (Artist: Usto-Mumin [Aleksandr Nikolayev])

A 1933 poster in Russian and Uzbek is aimed at encouraging cotton pickers. The text reads: "We will harvest the cotton on time. 1st cotton harvest. 2nd cotton harvest. 3rd cotton harvest." (Artist: Semyon Malt)
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A 1933 poster in Russian and Uzbek is aimed at encouraging cotton pickers. The text reads: "We will harvest the cotton on time. 1st cotton harvest. 2nd cotton harvest. 3rd cotton harvest." (Artist: Semyon Malt)

A 1920 poster calls on Tatar women to join the ranks of Russia's female proletariat. The text in Russian and Tatar (using Arabic script) says: "Tatar woman! Join the ranks of all the workers of Soviet Russia. Hand in hand with Russian proletarian women you'll break the chains of the past."
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A 1920 poster calls on Tatar women to join the ranks of Russia's female proletariat. The text in Russian and Tatar (using Arabic script) says: "Tatar woman! Join the ranks of all the workers of Soviet Russia. Hand in hand with Russian proletarian women you'll break the chains of the past."

A 1930s poster in Russian extolls the advantages of flying instead of traveling overland in a caravan. The poster says how a plane can get you to your destination within hours, whereas caravans take days, weeks, or even months. (Artist: A. Stren)
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A 1930s poster in Russian extolls the advantages of flying instead of traveling overland in a caravan. The poster says how a plane can get you to your destination within hours, whereas caravans take days, weeks, or even months. (Artist: A. Stren)

A poster in Tatar on agricultural progress features excerpts from speeches by Vladimir Lenin, Josef Stalin, and Mikhail Kalinin.
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A poster in Tatar on agricultural progress features excerpts from speeches by Vladimir Lenin, Josef Stalin, and Mikhail Kalinin.

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