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Covered: Magazines On 'Putin's Crimean War'

Western magazine covers are having a field day with Russia's military occupation of Crimea, portraying President Vladimir Putin variously as an arsonist, a strait-jacketed crazy, or a devilish, Brezhnevesque presence. Russian-language publications, meanwhile, are largely taking a less strident approach.

"Putin's Crimean War. What's Russia Playing At? What Threatens Poland?" asks Poland's "Polityka."
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"Putin's Crimean War. What's Russia Playing At? What Threatens Poland?" asks Poland's "Polityka."

"'Evil Empire. If The World Does Not Stop Putin Now, It May Soon Be Too Late," says Polish "Newsweek."
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"'Evil Empire. If The World Does Not Stop Putin Now, It May Soon Be Too Late," says Polish "Newsweek."

Germany's "Der Spiegel" labels the Russian president "The Arsonist. Who will stop Putin?" 
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Germany's "Der Spiegel" labels the Russian president "The Arsonist. Who will stop Putin?" 

For Dutch weekly "Elsevier" the question is, "Does Putin Know His Limits?"
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For Dutch weekly "Elsevier" the question is, "Does Putin Know His Limits?"

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"Argumenty i fakty" plays on the similarity between the Russian for "peninsula" (half-island) and "island." "The Crimean half-ISLAND. Is Southeast Ukraine Drifting Toward Russia?" asks the Russian news magazine.
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"Argumenty i fakty" plays on the similarity between the Russian for "peninsula" (half-island) and "island." "The Crimean half-ISLAND. Is Southeast Ukraine Drifting Toward Russia?" asks the Russian news magazine.

"The Dementia Is Intense And Our Tanks Are Fast." "Novaya gazeta's" headline plays on a literary cliche ("the 'frost is hard") that is used to describe an absurd situation. The tanks are a reference to the wartime patriotic song, "The march of the Soviet tankmen."  Alongside its cannon-as-meat grinder, the Russian newspaper writes, "Under the pretext of the Ukrainian crisis, Moscow is ready to make decisions that will hit ordinary citizens."
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"The Dementia Is Intense And Our Tanks Are Fast." "Novaya gazeta's" headline plays on a literary cliche ("the 'frost is hard") that is used to describe an absurd situation. The tanks are a reference to the wartime patriotic song, "The march of the Soviet tankmen."  Alongside its cannon-as-meat grinder, the Russian newspaper writes, "Under the pretext of the Ukrainian crisis, Moscow is ready to make decisions that will hit ordinary citizens."

"Russky reporter" current-affairs weekly asks, "Can War Be Averted?"
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"Russky reporter" current-affairs weekly asks, "Can War Be Averted?"

"Is Lenin So Precious?" asks Ukrainian magazine "Korrespondent," which promises to "explain the mood in regions unsupportive of Maidan."
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"Is Lenin So Precious?" asks Ukrainian magazine "Korrespondent," which promises to "explain the mood in regions unsupportive of Maidan."

Czech weekly "Respekt" gives Putin the unmistakable eyebrows of an earlier Kremlin leader, Leonid Brezhnev, on its cover page headlined: "The World According To Putin."
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Czech weekly "Respekt" gives Putin the unmistakable eyebrows of an earlier Kremlin leader, Leonid Brezhnev, on its cover page headlined: "The World According To Putin."

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