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Afghans Driven By Taliban Offensive To Northern Haven

Khalid, 8, fled with his family from their home in Samangan Province.

MAZAR-E SHARIF, Afghanistan -- Homayra clings to the maimed body of her 8-year-old son. She gazes helplessly at the limp boy in her arms, contemplating the misery in which they find themselves.

"He can't move, but I can't do anything," the 27-year-old widow laments at a makeshift refugee camp outside Mazar-e Sharif, the capital of Afghanistan's northern Balkh Province.

"I've spent all my money on medicine for him, but now I've run out," she adds in a parched voice, waving X-ray images of her paralyzed boy Omar from his infancy, when the family had access to medical care.

Homayra and Omar are among the tens of thousands of war-scarred Afghans who have fled their homes in northern Afghanistan amid a fierce offensive by the fundamentalist Taliban, who remain at war with central authorities a full 13 years after the U.S.-led coalition chased them from power.

Many, like Homayra, have sought refuge in Balkh Province, the last oasis of relative peace in the region.

Soaring Numbers Of Refugees

Governor Atta Mohammad Noor, powerful former warlord, has run Balkh with an iron fist for the past 12 years, making the province one of the most stable and prosperous in the country.

Given its strategic location, Balkh's stability has also been a key focus of NATO forces.

Large numbers of internally displaced persons (IDPs) remain unregistered with local authorities, but migration officials estimate the figure in Balkh to be as high as 20,000.

More than 300 families in the past several months have made this dusty patch of land outside of Mazar-e Sharif their temporary home.

Homayra and her family fled their home in Faryab Province, in the country's northwest near the border with Turkmenistan, one month ago. Her husband was killed by a stray bullet during fighting in her hometown between Taliban gunmen and Afghan government forces.

In Pictures: The Refugees Of Mazar-e Sharif

"His father was killed haplessly," says Homayra, who is draped in a long white scarf. "A lot of people have been killed in our area. Many homes have been destroyed by the fighting."

She lives in the displaced-persons camp with her mother-in-law, Faizia, a 60-year-old woman covered in a blue cloak.

"My grandson and husband were killed by the Taliban," says Faizia, who is blind in one eye from a shrapnel wound. "We are homeless. We don't have shelter or food to eat. All we have are these tents we put up."

Desperate Conditions

The United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR) and the Provincial Department of Repatriation and Refugees (DoRR) have begun distributing packages of humanitarian aid to several hundred families in Balkh.

And the camp's residents say the provincial government has allocated land for their temporary shelter as well as provided sacks of wheat every few months.

But many of the IDPs, who fled with little more than the clothes on their backs, complain that local authorities and international aid organizations should do more.

The camp's residents must walk for an hour to collect water from a well in a nearby village. Some work in nearby kilns, making line after line of clay bricks from dusk to dawn. Others work on farms in the area, picking fruit in the scorching sun. Many, however, beg on the dusty streets of Mazar-e Sharif to eke out a living.

Mohammad Asef, a bearded, middle-aged man, says he fled Sar-e Pol Province to the east two months ago, after a rocket landed on his house, instantly killing his wife and child.

Unable to work because of his own wounds, Asef says he and the rest of the camp's inhabitants won't survive long without additional assistance.

"We don't have water or electricity," Asef says. "The only shelter is these tents that you see. We want to build homes so we're not exposed to the elements."

For many of the displaced Afghans, desperate living conditions are the price they have had to pay for life in the relative safety of Balkh. But the violence has followed some migrants to their adopted homes.

"I'm so scared that I can't sleep. I fled because they would have killed me," says Mohammad Yusuf, a former soldier from Kunduz Province, one of the harder-hit provinces to the northeast. "[But] to seek revenge, the Taliban even come here."

He cites an example freshly etched in his mind, of another former soldier from Kunduz whose family was gunned down in the makeshift camp by masked gunmen. "It was here that they killed his wife and two of his brothers this week," he says.

Violence Spreading

Taliban fighters conducted a major spring offensive in northern Afghanistan, which had been relatively stable compared with the explosive south and east of the country. But now, battles are raging across the region, with Afghan national forces struggling to fend off militants who have overrun districts and killed scores of government troops.

INFOGRAPHIC: Afghanistan's New Northern Flash Points

Even Balkh has not been shielded from the soaring violence.

In several districts, the Taliban is waging war with Afghan soldiers and pro-government militias, prompting residents to flee to Mazar-e Sharif and its surrounding areas.

"So many of our people were killed and taken," says Agha Jan, an elderly farmer from Chimtal district who moved to the outskirts of Mazar-e Sharif three months ago. "We had to leave our area. Eighteen people were killed by the Taliban in our village alone."

Jan says they were not only being targeted by militants, but were also being preyed upon by pro-government militias deployed to fight the Taliban in far-flung parts of Balkh.

"During the day, the Taliban would beat us up and ransack our homes," he says. "During the night, it was the militias' turn."

Afghan national authorities are struggling to wrest momentum from the Taliban and other armed antigovernment forces 13 years after an UN-backed plan was put in place to succeed the Taliban.

Those "enemies of Afghanistan," in the words of Kabul authorities, continue their deadly strikes aimed at civilian and military targets, including a daylight attack on the parliament building that killed six people.

The Afghan security and police forces are still undermanned, and their job was made even more pressing by the withdrawal of U.S. and other international combat forces by the end of last year.

Abdul Hamid, a stocky shepherd from the Chahar Bolak district who's now in Balkh, left his family behind after he became a marked man by the Taliban.

"I can't go back to my village," he says. "I still have family there, but it's too dangerous to go."

More News

The Azadi Briefing: Another School Year Begins With Afghan Girls Shut Out Of Class

Younger girls attend class at a local school in Zabul on March 14.

Welcome to The Azadi Briefing, an RFE/RL newsletter that unpacks the key issues in Afghanistan. To subscribe, click here.

I'm Abubakar Siddique, a senior correspondent at RFE/RL's Radio Azadi. Here's what I've been tracking and what I'm keeping an eye on in the days ahead.

The Key Issue

A new school year began in Afghanistan this week, but with girls above the sixth grade still banned from attending class.

Last year, the Taliban made a last-minute U-turn after promising for months to allow teenage girls to attend school. But this year, there were few signs before the academic year began that the militants would reverse their ban. In December, the Taliban also banned university education for women.

Human rights groups and female Afghan activists this week condemned the Taliban's ban. In a statement on March 21, UNICEF said the militant group's "unjustified and shortsighted decision has crushed the hopes and dreams of more than 1 million girls."

Former Afghan lawmaker Shukria Barakzai told Radio Azadi that the ban epitomized the Taliban's worldview, which she said fears educated women.

Afghanistan is the only country in the world where girls are prohibited from going to high school.

Why It's Important: The Taliban's restrictions on girls' education as well as its severe constraints on women's right to work and freedom of movement have signaled to Afghans and the international community that the militant group is bent on reestablishing its brutal regime of the 1990s.

The Taliban's draconian policies on girls and women appear to have backfired. The restrictions are considered one of the reasons the hard-line Islamist group has yet to gain international recognition and domestic legitimacy.

The education ban has even undermined the Taliban's religious credentials. The group has come under strong criticism from Muslim countries and Islamic clerics, who have called for the Taliban to rescind its ban.

What's Next: In the long term, the Taliban's education ban is likely to have a devastating social and economic impact.

In August, UNICEF estimated that the Taliban's education ban translated to a loss of at least $500 million for the Afghan economy in the last 12 months.

With the Taliban refusing to reverse its ban, some Afghans have called for the international community to impose further sanctions against the Taliban government.

"Sanctions against the Taliban leaders responsible for these bans would force them to rescind such policies," Shinkai Karokhail, a female former Afghan lawmaker, told Radio Azadi.

The Week's Best Stories

The preservation of Afghanistan's rich cultural heritage has been impeded by decades of war, destruction, and desecration. But while the Taliban's return to power has raised fears of a return to its ruinous old ways when it comes to the country's pre-Islamic history, preservationists continue to pick up the pieces with a surprising level of cooperation.

Norouz festivities are making a limited comeback among Pashtun communities in northwestern Pakistan. The traditional spring celebrations marking the arrival of the New Year died down a century ago due to calendar changes and imperial borders that limited their contacts with fellow Pashtuns in Afghanistan and other communities.

What To Keep An Eye On

The Taliban's influential finance minister, Mullah Hidayatullah Badri, was demoted and appointed as the new head of Afghanistan's central bank on March 22.

The demotion came after speculation that Badri had threatened to resign from his post because of differences with Taliban Supreme Leader Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada.

One account suggests that Badri opposed Akhundzada's 2021 decision to impose a blanket ban on opium cultivation without providing alternative livelihoods to the tens of thousands of farmers in southern Afghanistan, where Badri is from, who were dependent on the illicit drug trade.

During its 19-year insurgency, the Taliban is believed to have earned billions from the drug trade. Experts say the Taliban taxed poppy farmers and was involved in the trafficking of narcotics to neighboring countries.

In recent months, senior Taliban officials have publicly criticized Akhundzada, who has been accused of monopolizing power and empowering a cohort of radical clerics.

Why It's Important: Badri, also known by his alias Gul Agha, was among the founding members of the Taliban in the mid-1990s. He controlled the Taliban's finances for more than two decades.

Badri is a prominent Taliban figure from the southern province of Helmand. The so-called Helmand Shura, or council that Badri was a member of, led the Taliban insurgency for several years. In May 2016, a U.S. drone strike killed Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansur inside Pakistan, which weakened the faction.

Badri was the only minister appointed from this faction when the Taliban announced its government in September 2021. His departure from the top echelons of the Taliban government deprives this powerful Taliban faction of a share in power.

Badri also figures prominently on the UN sanctions list against the Taliban leaders. His appointment to Afghanistan's central bank could further complicate the group's international dealings.

Until next time,

Abubakar Siddique

If you enjoyed this briefing and don't want to miss the next edition, subscribe here. It will be sent to your inbox every Friday.

Migrants From Afghanistan, Pakistan Found In Truck In Serbia

Serbia lies at the heart of the so-called Balkan land route that refugees and migrants use to try to reach Western Europe. (illustrative photo)

Serbia's customs authorities said on March 24 they discovered nine migrants hiding among aluminum rolls in a truck headed to Poland from Greece. Customs officers on Serbia's border with North Macedonia spotted the migrants on March 22 during a scan that showed human silhouettes in the back of the truck, a statement said. The migrants were young men from Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Syria, the statement added. Serbia lies at the heart of the so-called Balkan land route that refugees and migrants use to try to reach Western Europe and start new lives there. To read the original story by AP, click here.

U.K. Inquiry Vows To Get To Bottom Of Afghan Extrajudicial Killings Allegations

The chair of a public inquiry examining "extremely serious" allegations that British armed forces carried out dozens of extrajudicial killings in Afghanistan said on March 22 that any soldiers who had broken the law should face investigation. The independent inquiry was ordered by Britain's Defense Ministry in December 2022 after a BBC TV documentary reported that soldiers from the elite Special Air Service (SAS) had killed 54 people in suspicious circumstances. It also came after two families, who accuse the SAS of killing their relatives in 2011 and 2012, began legal action to demand judicial reviews of their cases. To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

From Our Regions: Norouz Celebrations Welcome Spring

Updated

Earthquake Kills At Least 13 In Pakistan, Afghanistan

Rescue workers attend to an earthquake victim at a hospital in Swat in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province on March 22.

A 6.5-magnitude earthquake with an epicenter in the northeastern Afghan region of Hindukush has killed at least 13 people and injured dozens in Pakistan and Afghanistan, authorities and local officials say.

Taimur Ali Mashal, spokesman for the Natural Disaster Management Agency (PDMA) in Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, told RFE/RL's Radio Mashaal that nine people had died and at least 47 injured in the province bordering Afghanistan.

Rescuer Bilal Faizi told RFE/RL that the temblor caused material damage in 10 districts of Khyber Pakhtunkwa.

The quake was felt in several large Pakistani cities, including the capital, Islamabad, as well as Peshawar, Lahore, Rawalpindi, and Quetta.

Pakistani Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif said he ordered disaster-management agencies to remain on alert.

In Kabul, Sharafat Zaman, a spokesman for the Taliban-led Ministry of Public Health, said the quake struck several Afghan provinces, killing four people, including one child, and injuring 70.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid tweeted that the Ministry of Public Health had ordered all health facilities to be on high alert.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the epicenter was located 40 kilometers south-southeast of Jurm in Afghanistan's mountainous Hindukush region, close to the border with Pakistan and Tajikistan.

The temblor was felt as far as New Delhi in India as well as Tajikistan, local media reported.

The mountainous Hindukush region, where the Arabian, Indian and Eurasian tectonic plates meet, is prone to violent earthquakes. In 2005, a 7.6-magnitude tremor killed thousands of people in Pakistan and Kashmir.

In June 2022, more than 1,000 people were killed by 5.9-magnitude earthquake in the border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

With reporting by AP and dpa

Picking Up The Pieces

The Bala Hissar citadel

The recent past has not been kind to Afghanistan's pre-Islamic heritage. Will history repeat itself under the new Taliban government?

Just months before the Taliban was ousted from power in 2001, the hard-line Islamist group took a wrecking ball to Afghanistan's pre-Islamic history.

That spring, the Bamiyan Buddhas that had stood tall for more than 1,400 years were reduced to rubble over the course of a few weeks after Taliban fighters blasted them with artillery before finishing them off with dynamite.

The Bamiyan Buddhas in1997
The Bamiyan Buddhas in1997
The Bamiyan Buddhas in 2023
The Bamiyan Buddhas in 2023

That infamous assault on Afghan history reverberated around the world, but an equally destructive but lesser-known offense had also just been carried out in Kabul, leaving much of Afghanistan's vast collection of pre-Islamic art in pieces.

"The Taliban in 2001 went through the National Museum of Afghanistan and smashed probably thousands of sculptures," explained Gil Stein, a professor of Near Eastern archaeology at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute. "And curators of the museum, at very great risk to themselves...waited until the Taliban left the building and swept up all the fragments, and put them in trunks and hid the trunks in the basement."

A Buddhist sculpture at Afghanistan's National Museum.
A Buddhist sculpture at Afghanistan's National Museum.

It was only well after the Taliban appeared to be safely out of power -- and a full four years into their work with outside preservationists -- that the curators revealed their secret, according to Stein, who directed cultural preservation efforts in cooperation with the museum and the Afghan Institute of Archeology for more than 13 years.

Restoration work at the National Museum
Restoration work at the National Museum

Golden Age For Restoration

The revelation paved the way for the Hadda Sculptural Project -- a painstaking effort to piece together more than 7,600 fragments of rare Buddhist and Gandharian-style sculptures that had been excavated from an archeological site in southeastern Afghanistan, and which the Taliban had destroyed because the group considered representations of living beings idolatrous and un-Islamic.

Conservator Sherazuddin Saifi works on pieces of a small statue damaged by the Taliban because they were judged to be against Islam at the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul in August 2019.
Conservator Sherazuddin Saifi works on pieces of a small statue damaged by the Taliban because they were judged to be against Islam at the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul in August 2019.

It was just one of many ambitious archeological and cultural restoration ventures that were launched as funding and resources flowed in after the Taliban was toppled, and more attention was paid to reverse the cycle of destruction that began with the Soviet withdrawal and continued during the subsequent years of civil war and Taliban rule.

Hundreds of new archeological sites were discovered and mapped, cultural treasures were restored, and antiquities that had been held in safe keeping abroad were returned to their rightful home.

The nongovernmental Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), which had begun work in Afghanistan in 2002, launched hundreds of projects, including the restoration of Kabul's Bagh-e Babur, a garden and park that dates back to the 1500s and holds the tomb of Babur, the first Mughal emperor.

A photograph taken in April 2018 shows the Bagh-e-Babur garden in Kabul.
A photograph taken in April 2018 shows the Bagh-e-Babur garden in Kabul.

The French Archaeological Delegation in Afghanistan, whose cooperation with Kabul began in the 1920s, worked with AKDN to restore the oldest mosque in the country, the ninth-century Noh Gonbad, or Nine Cupolas, located in the northern Balkh Province.

Roland Besenval, director of the French Archaeological Delegation in Afghanistan, works at the site restoring Noh-Gonbad in May 2008.
Roland Besenval, director of the French Archaeological Delegation in Afghanistan, works at the site restoring Noh-Gonbad in May 2008.

The Afghan Museum in Exile, a collection of more than 1,400 artifacts that had been secured in Switzerland since 1999, was returned to the reconstructed National Museum of Afghanistan after UNESCO determined that it was safe to do so. Among the items, some of which had been taken from the museum, was a gargoyle of Alexander the Great's fighting dog and a foundation stone that is believed to have been laid by the conqueror himself.

The director of the Afghan Museum in Exile, Paul Bucherer, told RFE/RL in written comments that from the inception of the project, it was "clear that one day all the holdings would be returned to Kabul."

Museum workers stand next to artifacts that were smuggled to the United States andt then returned to the National Museum in Kabul in April 2021.
Museum workers stand next to artifacts that were smuggled to the United States andt then returned to the National Museum in Kabul in April 2021.

Items that had been smuggled out of Afghanistan to the United States and other countries were also returned, and by 2021 the Oriental Institute had succeeded in partially reassembling more than 480 of the sculptures that had been destroyed at the National Museum, using digital documentation to make 3D models of what had been lost.

3D imaging/models of early Buddhist sculptures from Hadda that had been smashed by the Taliban in 2001.
3D imaging/models of early Buddhist sculptures from Hadda that had been smashed by the Taliban in 2001.

The institute, in cooperation with the U.S. State Department, also compiled a database of antiquities for scholarly research and digitally mapped archeological sites across Afghanistan.

And then the Taliban returned.

Bad History

Even before the Taliban seized power in August 2021, its leadership had affirmed its commitment to preserve and protect Afghanistan's cultural heritage, and forbade the looting of archeological sites and smuggling of artifacts. After retaking control of Kabul, it established a dedicated police force to monitor heritage sites to prevent looting and illegal excavations.

"The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan greatly protects cultural and historical places and monuments," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in response to questions from RFE/RL's Radio Azadi this month, referring to the formal name of the Taliban government. "All historical sites are safe and there is no danger to them."

Nevertheless, the Taliban's failure to fulfil many of its other promises, including upholding women's rights and press freedom, as well as its track record of destroying historical sites and relics, raised fears that it could return to its old ways.

"We're all too aware of the history," said Ajmal Maiwandi, head of Aga Khan Cultural Services, Afghanistan. "For those of us that work in conservation in Afghanistan, we initially held our breath in terms of the [Taliban's] approach this time around."

But Maiwandi says his organization has so far been uninhibited in its cultural preservation work. "What we've discovered is that there's a different policy that accepts all heritage, Islamic and pre-Islamic, as part of the national heritage of Afghanistan," Maiwandi said.

Work Goes On

One current AKDN project is the restoration and development of the Bala Hissar citadel, a fortress that takes up 55 hectares and is believed to date back to as early as the fifth century and is considered one of the oldest continuously occupied locations in Kabul.

The Bala Hissar citadel
The Bala Hissar citadel

In the western province of Herat, the AKDN is repairing one of the five surviving minarets that was on the verge of collapse and is part of a madrasah, or Islamic seminary, complex built by the Timurid Queen Gawhar Shad in the 15th century.

The Herat Minaret
The Herat Minaret

The Swiss Aliph Foundation, meanwhile, worked to restore the Stupa-e Shewaki, a Buddhist shrine from the first century north of Kabul that was once part of a pilgrimage route from India to the Bamiyan Valley in central Afghanistan.

And in October, the Taliban approved a project funded by the Aliph Foundation to prevent the collapse of the Yu Aw Synagogue in Herat Province, built at the turn of the 20th century, although virtually all of the northwestern region's Jewish population that once numbered in the tens of thousands fled abroad in recent decades.

The AKDN was founded in 1967 by Aga Khan IV, the current leader of the Ismailis, a branch of Shi'ite Islam. Most Ismailis live in Africa and Asia, including in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran, and Tajikistan.

Asked whether the AKDN's role as a prominent Shi'ite organization has affected its work under the Taliban, a radical Sunni group, Maiwandi said the entity "consists of nondenominational development agencies working across multiple regions of Afghanistan and our work aims to improve the living conditions and livelihoods of a wide range of Afghans across different communities and ethnicities."

Huge Obstacles

Despite the efforts of foreign organizations, the preservation of cultural heritage remains in danger.

Funding and resources have fallen sharply and the looting of archeological sites and the smuggling of artifacts plague the country under Taliban rule.

Stein says that satellite imagery has revealed that dozens of archeological sites are being illegally exploited, some at an industrialized scale that involves the use of heavy equipment to uncover artifacts.

"It's really hard to know what the current status of heritage is in the country," said Stein, whose Oriental Institute closed its offices in Kabul ahead of the Taliban's return but continues outreach efforts from abroad. "One thing we've continued to do is we get fairly updated remote-sensing imagery. So, we are actually able to monitor the condition of a lot of the major archaeological sites around the country and we're able to see if they're being looted."

Images of site looting in Afghanistan
Images of site looting in Afghanistan

Taliban spokesman Mujahid denied that any such looting was occurring. "We don't have any cases where someone has done illegal excavations at archaeological sites or looted antiquities," he told RFE/RL, saying that any threats to historical and cultural monuments could be attributed to "natural disasters."

But Stein says that the reality is that even if the Taliban has issued decrees against the looting of archeological sites, it does not mean they are being enforced across the country.

Development -- The Biggest Danger

According to Stein, large-scale projects and the Taliban's dire need for revenue presents an even bigger danger to the preservation of Afghanistan's cultural heritage.

He cites Mes Aynak, located just south of Kabul in Logar Province, as the primary example. Mes Aynak is the site of an ancient Buddhist settlement, but it also sits on the second-largest source of copper on Earth, a resource potentially worth billions of dollars that Afghanistan has been trying to capitalize on for more than a decade.

Mes Aynak in 2015
Mes Aynak in 2015

The project to exploit the site, for which a Chinese mining company won the tender under the previous government, was suspended in 2019. But discussions are ongoing, now with the involvement of the AKDN at the Taliban's request.

This photograph taken on May 17, 2022, shows the base of a Chinese consortium in Mes Aynak.
This photograph taken on May 17, 2022, shows the base of a Chinese consortium in Mes Aynak.

Mujahid said the Taliban holds meetings with the AKDN "from time to time." "Some cultural and historical places the [AKDN] takes care of are also monitored and we work closely with them," he told RFE/RL. "We want to ensure that the ancient artifacts and historical heritages in Mes Aynak are either safely kept in the same area or transferred to another place more professionally and ensure their complete safety."

"By having a say it means that we can ensure that, where there is a large-scale salvage operation, that that operation could be done well, it could be done to standard," Maiwandi said. "It could be done in consultation with different groups and different interests."

Buddha statues discovered inside an ancient monastery in Mes Aynak in 2010
Buddha statues discovered inside an ancient monastery in Mes Aynak in 2010

The TAPI pipeline, another long-sought project that would carry natural gas from Turkmenistan to India by way of Afghanistan and Pakistan, also risks endangering archeological sites, leading to efforts by the Oriental Institute to encourage the Taliban to consider allowing a 5-kilometer-wide buffer zone on either side of the length of the pipeline.

And the large-scale Khush Tapa irrigation project, which the Taliban expects will result in what will be Afghanistan's largest canal funneling water to farmers' fields in Jawzjan, Balkh, and Kunduz provinces, has led to a push by preservationists to try to convince the Taliban to take into account the possible destruction of ancient sites along the way.

"There's at least some evidence that this kind of personal approach can work," Stein said.

Staying Out Of Sight

Stein expresses hope for the future, saying he was "astounded" by the Taliban's work with the AKDN on the Bala Hissar citadel in Kabul.

"So, there are things that can happen, but it's not going to be the way it used to be," he said. "The Taliban will be very selective with who they'll be willing to allow to work there.... if there were more examples like that, it would be wonderful."

As for the sculptures that barely escaped the Taliban's last stint in power, Stein is also cautiously optimistic, saying that the authorities are "behaving themselves."

Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid (left) visits the Heritage Museum to mark Culture Day in Kabul on March 13, 2022.
Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid (left) visits the Heritage Museum to mark Culture Day in Kabul on March 13, 2022.

Almost all Buddhist and other pre-Islamic art has been taken off display at the National Museum, he says. But from what he understands, the museum is being guarded by the Taliban and the exhibits have been placed in storage, although he is unsure in what condition.

"That's really the best step one could hope for, that they're not damaging things, although it's off display," Stein said.

He says the Taliban appears to be following an old saying among Pashtuns, the ethnicity of many members of the group: "A shame that is not seen is not a shame."

A complete figure of a seated Buddha dating from the third or fourth century is seen on display at the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul in 2019.
A complete figure of a seated Buddha dating from the third or fourth century is seen on display at the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul in 2019.

Grenade Blast Kills Mother, Five Children In Central Afghanistan

Five children along with their mother were killed when a grenade exploded in Afghanistan’s central Ghor Province, local officials said on March 20. Abdulhai Zaeem, the provincial director of information and culture, told the dpa news agency that the incident happened on March 19 in the provincial capital Firozkoh, while the children were playing with a hand grenade inside their house. Unexploded military supplies left from decades of war often cause casualties among children in Afghanistan. On March 17, two children were killed and two others wounded when they were hit by an unexploded mortar shell in Logar Province.

Top Afghan Taliban Leader Issues Decree Against Nepotism

Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada

The supreme leader of the Taliban has issued a decree against nepotism, barring officials in Afghanistan's Taliban administration from hiring relatives in government positions. The shadowy leader, Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada, also ordered all Taliban officials to sack their sons and other relatives who are working in their administration. The decree was posted late on March 18 on the Taliban government's Twitter account. It did not elaborate on the reasons behind the decree, but it followed rumors that many Taliban officials have appointed their relatives to high-ranking government positions rather than professionals or those with experience needed for the posts. To read the original story by AP, click here.

The Azadi Briefing: Afghan Refugees Complain Of Prisonlike Conditions In The U.A.E.

Thousands of Afghan evacuees remain stranded in temporary accommodation abroad, not just in the U.A.E., but also in Qatar, Kosovo, and Albania. (file photo)

Welcome back to The Azadi Briefing, an RFE/RL newsletter that unpacks the key issues in Afghanistan. To subscribe, click here.

I'm Mustafa Sarwar, a senior news editor at RFE/RL's Radio Azadi. Here's what I've been tracking and what I'm keeping an eye on in the days ahead.

The Key Issue

After the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan in August 2021, the United States, the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), and other countries evacuated tens of thousands of Afghans to temporary facilities around the world.

The U.A.E. took in thousands of Afghans, housing them in makeshift refugee housing. Many of the Afghans were later resettled to the United States, Canada, and elsewhere. But up to 2,700 Afghans remain stranded in the Gulf nation after not qualifying for resettlement.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) accused the U.A.E. of “arbitrarily detaining” the remaining Afghans. In a report issued on March 15, the rights group said the U.A.E. was keeping “thousands of Afghan asylum seekers locked up for over 15 months in cramped, miserable conditions with no hope of progress on their cases."

The Gulf nation denied reports of dire living conditions and said it was working with the United States to resettle the remaining evacuees in a “timely manner.”

Dayan Fayez, an Afghan evacuee in the U.A.E., told Radio Azadi that they have limited access to basic services, including education. Another Afghan evacuee, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said they are “not allowed to go outside the camp.”

Why It's Important: The allegations highlight what activists have called the shocking plight of Afghans stranded in limbo in the U.A.E.

Thousands of other Afghan evacuees remain stranded in temporary housing in Qatar, Kosovo, and Albania as they wait to be resettled to third countries. Some Afghans in those facilities have also complained of mistreatment.

Many Afghan evacuees have protested what they call the protracted resettlement process to the United States and elsewhere, with rights groups repeatedly calling for Washington and other governments to fast-track the process.

What's Next: The fate of the Afghan refugees in the U.A.E., who are not eligible for resettlement elsewhere, remains unclear.

Many of the Afghans have said they cannot return to Afghanistan because they fear reprisals from the Taliban, which has been accused of widespread human rights abuses since seizing power.

Many Afghans who fled their homeland had worked in some capacity for the Western-backed Afghan government that collapsed, the NATO-led mission in the country, or for Western embassies or organizations, making them a target for retribution.

The Week's Best Stories

Dozens of Afghan refugees hoping to emigrate to the West have become stranded in Pakistan, sheltering in a squalid camp in the capital, Islamabad. They fled Afghanistan after the Taliban seized power in 2021. Women vastly outnumber men at the refugee camp. In this video, RFE/RL's Radio Mashaal visited the camp where refugees struggle to survive on handouts from charities.

March 11 marked the anniversary of the destruction of Bamiyan’s sixth-century Buddha statues by the Taliban in 2001. Archaeologists working to preserve what little cultural heritage is still present in the Bamiyan Valley have been dealing with illegal excavations, encroaching developments, and Taliban gunmen who use the remnants of the Buddhas for target practice.​

What To Keep An Eye On

India offered Taliban diplomats and officials an online course in economics and leadership.

The four-day program -- called ‘immersing with Indian thoughts’ -- started on March 14 and was attended by several members of the Taliban, according to Indian media.

The training course was organized by India’s Ministry of External Affairs. The program covered India’s “economic environment, regulatory ecosystem, leadership insights, social and historical backdrop, cultural heritage, legal and environmental landscape, consumer mindsets and business risks.”​

Why It's Important: India’s offer of training courses to the Taliban raised eyebrows.

India is a longtime foe of the Taliban. In the 1990s, New Delhi backed the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance. After the Taliban regime was ousted in 2001, India was a close ally of the Western-backed Afghan government. The Taliban, on the other hand, is a historical ally of Pakistan, India’s archenemy.

Since the Taliban regained power, New Delhi has expressed concerns about the threat of terrorism emanating from Taliban-ruled Afghanistan and criticized the militant group’s human rights abuses. But its offer of online courses to the Taliban could hint at India’s attempt to establish some sort of relations with the militant group.

India on March 16 said the offer of training courses did not mean it had recognized the Taliban government. No country in the world has yet to recognize the Taliban as the legitimate ruler of Afghanistan.

That's all from me for now. Don't forget to send me any questions, comments, or tips that you have.

Until next time,

Mustafa Sarwar

If you enjoyed this briefing and don't want to miss the next edition, subscribe here. It will be sent to your inbox every Friday.

UN Security Council Asks For Advice On Dealing With Afghan Taliban

Afghan women stage a protest for women's rights to mark International Women's Day in Afghanistan.

The UN Security Council on March 16 asked Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to provide an independent assessment on how to deal with Afghanistan's Taliban-led government. The 15-member council unanimously adopted a resolution that requires Guterres to submit the report in mid-November. The Taliban has banned women and girls from attending high school and university and working for aid groups. Women are also not allowed to leave the home without a male relative and must cover their faces. The Taliban says it respects women's rights in accordance with its strict interpretation of Islamic law.

U.A.E. 'Arbitrarily' Detaining Thousands Of Afghan Refugees, Says Rights Watchdog

Afghans refugees attend a protest over the lengthy U.S. relocation process at a Gulf facility where they have been housed since fleeing their homeland in 2021, in Abu Dhabi on February 10, 2022.

The United Arab Emirates is holding up to 2,700 Afghans who fled their country as the Taliban returned to power in August 2021 following the withdrawal of the U.S.-led forces, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said on March 15. Many Afghans who fled to U.A.E. were later resettled in the United States, Canada, and other countries, but "between 2,400 and 2,700 Afghans remain arbitrarily detained in the U.A.E.," HRW said. "The U.A.E. should urgently release those arbitrarily detained and provide access to fair and efficient processes for determining their status and protection needs," it said. To read the original statement by Human Rights Watch, click here.

Afghan Women Refugees Stranded In Pakistan See No Future

Afghan Women Refugees Stranded In Pakistan See No Future
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Dozens of Afghan refugees hoping to emigrate to the West have become stranded in Pakistan, sheltering in a squalid camp in the capital, Islamabad. They fled Afghanistan after the Taliban seized power in 2021. Women vastly outnumber men at the refugee camp and hope for asylum in the West but remain in limbo. RFE/RL's Radio Mashaal visited the camp where refugees struggle to survive on handouts from charities.

At Least 10 Miners Killed In Traffic Accident In Afghanistan

At least 10 employees of a gold mine died and eight were injured in a traffic accident on March 15 in Afghanistan's northern Takhar Province. Takhar police spokesman Abdul Mobin Safi told the media the pickup truck that was carrying the workers to the mine veered off the road and overturned in the Anjir area of Chah Ab district. Safi said some of the injured were in critical condition. The cause of the accident could not be immediately established. Deadly traffic accidents are frequent in Afghanistan due to reckless driving, bad roads, and poor vehicle maintenance. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Radio Azadi, click here.

Russia Invited To Participate In Central Asian Soccer Event

Russian teams have been barred from European and FIFA competitions since the invasion of Ukraine in February of last year. (file photo)

Russia has been invited to participate in the inaugural Central Asian Football Association Championships in June along with seven other national teams. Russian teams have been barred from European and FIFA competitions since the invasion of Ukraine in February of last year. But the Tajik Football Association announced on March 13 that a Russian team could join the new regional tournament along with former Soviet republics Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Kyrgyzstan. Afghanistan, Iran and another country, yet to be confirmed, will complete the lineup for the games expected to be hosted in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan and Tashkent, Uzbekistan. To read the original story by AP, click here.

Afghanistan Opens Four-Day Anti-Polio Vaccination Campaign

A health worker administers a polio vaccine to a child during a previous campaign in Kabul.

Afghanistan on March 13 kicked off a nationwide anti-polio vaccination campaign for children under the age of 5, the office of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) in Afghanistan told RFE/RL. The campaign is the second since the Taliban seized power in August 2021. Before returning to power, the Taliban had banned vaccinations in areas under their control, but then they agreed to allow such programs under a deal negotiated with the United Nations. Afghanistan and Pakistan are the only nations in the world where polio is still endemic. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Radio Azadi, click here.

Islamic State Claims Responsibility For Afghanistan Blast

People attend to a man injured in a blast in the Afghanistan's Balkh Province on March 11.

Islamic State has claimed responsibility for a March 11 attack in Afghanistan's Balkh Province, the extremist group's Telegram account said on March 12. The blast at a cultural center during an event for journalists in northern Afghanistan killed at least one person and wounded eight, according to authorities and journalists. The incident came a few days after the province's governor died in an explosion also claimed by Islamic State.

Young Afghan Women Training As Midwives To Save Lives In Remote Villages

In a small village located at the western end of the snow-covered Hindu Kush mountains in Afghanistan's Bamiyan Province, Aziza Rahimi, 35, mourns the baby she lost four months ago after a harrowing birth with no medical care.

Aziza Rahimi, 35, lost her son at birth.
Aziza Rahimi, 35, lost her son at birth.

Rahimi, who has five other children, said that riding a donkey to the nearest hospital was out of the question when she was jolted by pain while nine months pregnant in the middle of the night.

Stumbling and bleeding, she walked for two hours to her in-laws' house after her husband was unable to find help to take them to the hospital. She gave birth there. The baby boy died shortly after.

Aziza Rahimi (right) talks to a trainee midwife.
Aziza Rahimi (right) talks to a trainee midwife.

"It was hard for me when I lost my baby. As a mother, I nurtured the baby in my womb for nine months, but then I lost him. It is too painful," said Rahimi.

'When the roads are blocked, of course there is no means of transportation. People even use donkeys to move patients to the clinics, but sometimes there is not even the opportunity for that," said Mohammad Ashraf Niazi, the head of the UNHCR's Bamiyan office.
'When the roads are blocked, of course there is no means of transportation. People even use donkeys to move patients to the clinics, but sometimes there is not even the opportunity for that," said Mohammad Ashraf Niazi, the head of the UNHCR's Bamiyan office.

Rahimi is not the only mother who has lost her child. For many women living in Afghanistan's rugged and remote landscapes, the distance from their homes to hospitals can be the difference between life and death.

Isolation can become a death sentence in any difficult birth, doctors and aid workers say, contributing to Afghanistan's extremely high maternal and infant mortality rates, among the worst in the world.

A young girl plays outside her home in the remote Foladi Valley.
A young girl plays outside her home in the remote Foladi Valley.

However, a potentially life-saving improvement is on the way. Rahimi's village is one of several that have sent 40 young women to train in the provincial capital, Bamiyan, for two years as midwives, after which they will return home.

Trainee midwives attend a class in Bamiyan.
Trainee midwives attend a class in Bamiyan.

Since taking over in 2021, Taliban authorities have barred women from universities and most charity jobs, but they have made exemptions in the health-care sector. The UNHCR says local health authorities are supportive of the project.

A trainee midwife examines a woman in a hospital in Bamiyan.
A trainee midwife examines a woman in a hospital in Bamiyan.

The trainee midwife program has been spearheaded by the UNHCR, the UN's refugee agency, and the Watan Social and Technical Services Association, a local charity. They hope to expand the program, which also takes place in neighboring Daikundi Province.

A trainee midwife examines a woman and her newborn baby at a hospital in Bamiyan.
A trainee midwife examines a woman and her newborn baby at a hospital in Bamiyan.

Many of the trainee midwives, some with small children of their own, have faced logistical and financial challenges, often having to travel huge distances or live far from home to attend the program.

A woman dresses her child at a hospital in Bamiyan.
A woman dresses her child at a hospital in Bamiyan.
The notebook of a trainee midwife during a training class in Bamiyan.
The notebook of a trainee midwife during a training class in Bamiyan.

"We want to learn and serve the people of our village," said one 23-year-old trainee, who walks two hours each day to the hospital.

The UNHCR asked that the trainees not be named for safety reasons.

A woman in a maternity ward in Bamiyan.
A woman in a maternity ward in Bamiyan.

Women giving birth experience a very different situation in Bamiyan's main city hospital, where the trainee midwives work alongside staff and, with the help of a trainer, learn how to assess and guide pregnant women, deliver babies, and provide postpartum care.

Women line up outside a doctor's room at a hospital in Bamiyan.
Women line up outside a doctor's room at a hospital in Bamiyan.
A trainee midwife arranges her head scarf in front of a mirror at a training center.
A trainee midwife arranges her head scarf in front of a mirror at a training center.

"At first, I didn't want to study nursing or to be a midwife, but after I faced problems and pains during my pregnancy, I had a desire to study midwifery," said a 20-year old trainee, the mother of an 18-month-old son who struggled to access care in her village.

She said many women and families in remote areas did not have the information and support they needed to prepare for a safe delivery.

"We have to change such thoughts," she says. "I want to go to remote areas to treat women who face problems."

The snow-covered Foladi Valley in Bamiyan.
The snow-covered Foladi Valley in Bamiyan.

Fears Mount Over The Future Of Afghanistan's Historic Bamiyan Valley

Updated

Deadly Bomb Attack In Afghanistan's Fourth-Largest City Targets Journalists

People attend to a man injured in a blast in the Afghan city of Mazar-e Sharif on March 11.

A bomb blast at a journalism awards ceremony in the Afghan city of Mazar-e Sharif has killed three people and left 13 wounded, Afghan officials said. Some of the wounded were reportedly journalists and children. No one has claimed responsibility for the March 11 blast, which came two days after a bomb in the same city killed Balkh Province Governor Daud Muzmal and two others. To read the original story by RFE/RL’s Radio Azadi, click here.

The Azadi Briefing: Taliban Reels From Killing Of Senior Official

Dawood Muzammil is one of the most senior Taliban officials to be killed since the militant group seized power in Afghanistan in 2021.

Welcome back to The Azadi Briefing, an RFE/RL newsletter that unpacks the key issues in Afghanistan. To subscribe, click here.

I'm Mustafa Sarwar, a senior news editor at RFE/RL's Radio Azadi. Here's what I've been tracking and what I'm keeping an eye on in the days ahead.

The Key Issue

The Taliban’s governor of Afghanistan’s northern province of Balkh, Dawood Muzammil, was killed in a suicide bombing on March 9.

The Islamic State-Khorasan (IS-K) extremist group, a rival of the Taliban, took responsibility for the attack, claiming that a suicide bomber detonated his explosives inside Muzammil’s office.

Provincial police spokesman Asif Waziri told Radio Azadi that two other people were killed in the bombing.

Why It's Important: Muzammil is one of the most senior Taliban officials to be killed since the militant group seized power in August 2021. He is also the first Taliban-appointed governor to be assassinated during that time.

Muzammil was appointed as deputy interior minister when the Taliban regained power. He then served as the Taliban’s governor of the eastern province of Nangarhar, where he led operations against IS-K militants. During the Taliban’s insurgency, Muzammil was the head of the militant group’s military commission based in neighboring Pakistan.

Muzammil was part of a Taliban faction that is believed to have close links to neighboring Iran. In 2018, he was sanctioned by the U.S. Treasury for aiding Iran-sponsored armed groups in the region.

His killing has highlighted the enduring threat posed by IS-K to Afghanistan’s new rulers. In the past 18 months, the Taliban has waged a brutal war against IS-K, killing several of its senior commanders. But that has not appeared to blunt its operational capacity.

What's Next: IS-K militants are likely to continue carrying out high-profile attacks against Taliban officials.

The attacks are aimed at undermining the Taliban government and puncturing its narrative about establishing security in Afghanistan.

Muzammil’s killing is likely to lead to another wave of operations against suspected IS-K cells in Afghanistan. In February, the Taliban said it had killed two senior IS-K members in separate operations.

The Week's Best Stories

Through their art, eight Afghan women depict life under Taliban rule, leaving their homeland, and their aspirations for a better future. "Women are a source of light, courage, and motivation in their own homes but also on a greater scale," one artist told Radio Azadi. "They are the core pillars of every society."

Afghan musician Farida Tarana's new song, Group Sex, in which she criticizes polygamy and Taliban restrictions on women, has caused an uproar in Afghanistan since it was released three months ago. "A man is allowed to have four wives. Isn't that called group sex? Or is it a death sentence for a woman?" she told Radio Azadi.

Women’s Day is intended to celebrate women around the world. In Afghanistan, it is a reminder of the violent resistance to girls and women seeking an education, and the highs and ultimate crushing lows they have endured in pursuit of an inalienable right. “Now that the gates of the universities are closed, I'm entering a scary and dark valley," said one high school graduate.

What To Keep An Eye On

Universities in Afghanistan reopened on March 6 after a winter break, but with the Taliban’s ban on higher education for women still in force.

"A girl cannot study because of [the Taliban’s] absurd mentality. So we remain like birds with clipped wings," Madina, who studied psychology at Balkh University before the ban, told Radio Azadi.

In an open letter issued this week, female students who studied at Kabul University demanded that the Taliban overturn its ban. The letter urged male students to boycott their classes.

On Women’s Day on March 8, dozens of women and girls staged a protest in Kabul and demanded their rights, including being allowed to attend high school and university.

Why It's Important: The Taliban has offered no signs that it will overturn its ban on female education.

The militant group has come under mounting international pressure to reverse its restrictions. On March 7, the European Union sanctioned the Taliban’s Higher Education Minster Neda Mohammad Nadim and the minister for the propagation of virtue and the prohibition of vice, Mohammad Khalid Hanafi.

The Taliban’s war against women’s rights is likely to further isolate its government, which has not been recognized by any country.

That's all from me for now. Don't forget to send me any questions, comments, or tips that you have.

Until next time,

Mustafa Sarwar

If you enjoyed this briefing and don't want to miss the next edition, subscribe here. It will be sent to your inbox every Friday.

Art As Therapy: Afghan Women Paint Their Experiences Under Taliban Rule

An untitled painting by Mursal Ahmadzai
An untitled painting by Mursal Ahmadzai

Mursal Ahmadzai, 20, lives in Kabul. Ahmadzai was a graphic design student until the Taliban banned women from attending university.

“Unfortunately, like other Afghan girls, I now stay at home," she says. "I portray the pain and suffering of Afghan girls, which I don't like because I want to portray the joys of Afghan girls and the beauty of my homeland.”

Ahmadzai, who was in her third semester of university at the time of the forced school closures, wants to depict the aspirations of Afghan women hidden behind the burqa.

Hope by Mina Mamik
Hope by Mina Mamik

Mina Mamik's family is from Nangarhar Province. Her family moved to the Netherlands when she was a child.

“Our motherland went through terrible times, but now we are in one of the darkest stages of our history, as we are the only country in the world where girls can't go to school and educate themselves and are being restricted from many more things,” she says.

Mamik painted Hope to express her desire that Afghanistan will rise from the ashes again one day.

"Women are a source of light, courage, and motivation in their own homes but also on a greater scale. They are the core pillars of every society, and so are they the pillars of our society," she adds.

An untitled painting by Lema Sarwan
An untitled painting by Lema Sarwan

Lema Sarwan is from Ghazni Province. She has been living in Prague for more than a decade.

“This painting symbolizes the oppression of women in Afghanistan. The school girl is all ready to attend school but cannot because of the system put in place by the Taliban,” she says.

An untitled painting by Sara Rahmani
An untitled painting by Sara Rahmani

Sara Rahmani was born and raised in Afghanistan. She moved to the United States five years ago and is currently studying civil engineering. Her untitled painting above depicts the three stages of life for refugees, especially girls, who fled to a foreign country after the Taliban returned to power.

"The first phase is of Kabul's beauty, happiness, and freedom, while girls went to school like boys," she says.

The second stage follows the chaos during Taliban rule.

"The sad situation of closing schools for girls, the struggle of women and girls to regain their rights, and the attempts of people to escape Afghanistan, where the Taliban have created an environment like prison," she says.

Rahmani ends her piece with "the stage of regret and nostalgia after migration."

An untitled painting by Sara Rahmani
An untitled painting by Sara Rahmani
An untitled painting by Sara Rahmani
An untitled painting by Sara Rahmani
Queen of Freedom by Sara Barack
Queen of Freedom by Sara Barack

Sara Barack is a native of the western Herat region. She won a scholarship to study art and film in Turkey after finishing high school. She is renowned for being Afghanistan's first female animator.

She writes:

They made me unseen, shrouded and a nonbeing.

A shadow, no existence, made silent,

Denied of freedom, restricted to my cage.

Tell me how to handle my anger and my passion?

Tell me how can I be alive in this world?

Breaking The Chains by Rokhsar Rahimi
Breaking The Chains by Rokhsar Rahimi

Rokhsar Rahimi, 18, was born and raised in Kabul. She has held a number of art shows while a student in Kabul. She was in her final year of high school when the Taliban barred her and other young woman from finishing her studies.

Fearing persecution, Rahimi and her family fled Afghanistan. Her painting, Breaking The Chains, captures the plight of young women.

“As you can see in the picture, the chain tied to the girls' feet is breaking and they are moving toward the light for their future. The painting symbolizes the current situation of Afghan girls who are banned from education. But they do not accept this state, and millions of Afghan women and girls are fighting for their rights to education and work,” Rahimi says.

“Today, even though Afghan women are deprived of the right to education, they still study in secret and do not let others decide their fate.”

Cold War by Atena Sultani
Cold War by Atena Sultani

Atena Sultani is from Herat Province and is a graduate of the Faculty of Fine Arts at Herat University.

“In Afghanistan, women were and are victims of the war. These days, when Afghan girls are going through a ‘cold war’ waged upon them, I want to ask to please support them and speak out wherever you are in the world.”

Sultani is unable to continue her education elsewhere due to the Taliban's refusal to provide female graduates with their diplomas.

Afghan Girl Wearing A Chador by Maria Hosein-Habibi
Afghan Girl Wearing A Chador by Maria Hosein-Habibi

Maria Hosein-Habibi was born in Kabul and raised in Germany. She has been drawing and painting since childhood. She obtained a master's degree and since 2020 has been lecturing at a university, as well as teaching art and English at a secondary school.

“Through art, I try to highlight issues regarding Afghanistan and introduce Afghan culture," she says. "Other topics I refer to within my artistic work are questions of identity, social pressure and individual emotions.”

Her painting above is a metaphor for the current Taliban policies and her aspirations.

“It shows a girl with a chador, but underneath, she is reading a book that shines brightly," she says "It shows that education will grant a bright future. The book is called The Future Of Afghanistan."

Dozens Of Bodies Discovered After Taliban Clears Kabul District Known For Drug Use

Dozens Of Bodies Discovered After Taliban Clears Kabul District Known For Drug Use
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The bodies of 59 Afghans who allegedly had substance-abuse problems have been found in fresh graves in Kabul after Taliban authorities cleared out the Pul-e Sokhta district. While the Taliban is using the cleanup to promote its crackdown on drugs, the country continues to suffer from a serious addiction crisis. Afghans using drugs in the area have been rounded up, many have been beaten, and others locked in prison cells with hardened criminals and forced to immediately give up drugs. Many of their families do not know if their loved ones are dead or alive.

Updated

Taliban Governor Of Afghan Province Killed In Blast

Mohammad Dawood Muzammil, the governor of Balkh Province, is one of the highest-ranking Taliban officials to be killed since the group returned to power in August 2021. (file photo)

The Taliban governor of Afghanistan's Balkh Province was killed in a blast at his office on March 9, officials said.

"Mohammad Dawood Muzammil, the governor of Balkh, has been killed in an explosion this morning," the province's Taliban police spokesman Asif Waziri told RFE/RL.

Two other people were killed in the attack and two were wounded, Waziri said. The cause of the explosion was not immediately known.

Some local media reports said more than 30 people were wounded by the blast and were taken to hospital for treatment.

The Taliban-led government's spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahid, tweeted that Muzammil was "martyred in an explosion by the enemies of Islam" and said that an investigation into the attack has been opened.

Muzammil is one of the highest-ranking Taliban officials to be killed since the group returned to power in August 2021.

No group has claimed responsibility so far, but after returning to power in 2021, the Taliban has been targeted by Islamic State-Khorasan (IS-K), an offshoot of the Islamic State that has emerged as the Taliban's main rival in the war-wracked country.

Muzammil was appointed governor of Balkh last year after holding the same position in the eastern Nangarhar Province, where he coordinated a crackdown on IS militants.

IS-K has staged several attacks in Afghanistan recently, including one in January in which a suicide bomber killed at least 10 people when he blew himself up near the Foreign Ministry in Kabul.

Last month, Taliban security forces claimed to have killed two senior IS-K members.

Qari Fateh, the regional IS-K intelligence and operations chief, was killed together with another IS-K member in a Kabul raid on February 27, the Taliban-led government said.

Another senior IS-K leader, Ijaz Amin Ahingar, was reportedly killed in a previous raid in Kabul.

With reporting by AFP

UN Warns Of Aid Cuts Over Taliban Crackdown On Women's Rights

Afghans wait to receive food and coal distributed by an aid group in Kabul.

The UN envoy in Afghanistan warned on March 8 that a Taliban crackdown on women's rights is likely to lead to a drop in aid and development funding in the country. The UN has asked for $4.6 billion in 2023 to deliver help in Afghanistan, where two-thirds of the population -- some 28 million people -- need it to survive, said Roza Otunbaeva. But she told the UN Security Council that providing that assistance had been put at risk by the Taliban's bans on women attending high school and university, visiting parks, and working for aid groups. To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

Afghan Broadcaster Airs Rare All-Female Panel To Discuss Rights On Women's Day

According to one survey, more than three-quarters of female Afghan journalists have lost their jobs since the Taliban takeover. (file photo)

Afghan broadcaster Tolo News aired an all-female panel in its studio with an audience of women to mark International Women's Day on March 8, a rare broadcast since the Taliban took over and many female journalists left the profession or started working off-air. A survey by Reporters Without Borders last year found that more than 75 percent of female journalists had lost their jobs since the Taliban took over as foreign forces withdrew in August 2021. With surgical masks covering their faces, the panel of three women and one female moderator discussed the position of women in Islam. To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

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