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Gazprom's Skyscraping Giant

Russian energy giant Gazprom said on August 20 that it has finally been given the go ahead to begin constructing a giant skyscraper in St. Petersburg for its new headquarters. The announcement seems to have finally brought a long-running saga to an end, as the controversial project has been plagued by criticism and objections ever since it was first proposed in 2006.

The project's designers have described the proposed new building as "a highly sustainable concept," which includes an "intelligent" double outer skin to minimise heat loss in the freezing Russian winters.
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The project's designers have described the proposed new building as "a highly sustainable concept," which includes an "intelligent" double outer skin to minimise heat loss in the freezing Russian winters.

In order to win approval for the project, Gazprom had to change the original construction site to another area of St. Petersburg amid fears that it would ruin the city's historical skyline.
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In order to win approval for the project, Gazprom had to change the original construction site to another area of St. Petersburg amid fears that it would ruin the city's historical skyline.

The new location for Gazprom's headquarters is a 17-hectare brownfield site on the edge of St Petersburg, formerly used for the industrial storage of sand.
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The new location for Gazprom's headquarters is a 17-hectare brownfield site on the edge of St Petersburg, formerly used for the industrial storage of sand.

The new building should rise to a height of 426 meters and comprise 330,000 square meters of internal space.
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The new building should rise to a height of 426 meters and comprise 330,000 square meters of internal space.

The giant building is expected to cost $3 billion.
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The giant building is expected to cost $3 billion.

The project is due to be completed by 2018.
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The project is due to be completed by 2018.

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