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Iran President Demands Obama Not Sign Extension Of U.S. Sanctions

Iranian President Hassan Rohani (file photo)

Iranian President Hassan Rohani has urged U.S. President Barack Obama not to sign a 10-year extension of U.S. sanctions approved unanimously by the U.S. Senate.

In a speech to Iran's parliament on December 4, Rohani said the bill violates a landmark nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers.

On December 1, the U.S. Congress voted to extend the Iran Sanctions Act. .The bill now goes to the White House, where Obama is expected to sign it.

U.S. officials have said they've determined that the legislation does not violate the agreement that
lifted a variety of international sanctions in exchange for limitations on the Iranian nuclear program.

The United States still maintains its own separate set of sanctions on Iran, which will expire on December 31 if Obama does not sign the extension into law.

Rohani said Obama is "obliged" to let the sanctions expire. The Iranian president warned there will be a "prompt response" from Iran if the U.S. sanctions are extended.

"We are committed to an acceptable implementation of the deal, but in response to noncommitment, violation, or hesitation in its implementation, we will act promptly," Rohani said.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei warned last month that Tehran will retaliate if the United States renews the sanctions.

"The latest is an extension of sanctions for 10 years, that if it happens, would surely be against the [nuclear deal] and the Islamic republic would definitely react to it," Khamenei warned on November 23.

Based on reporting by AP, Reuters, and IRNA

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Somalia Questions Iranian, Pakistani 'Hostages' Found Near Al-Shabaab Territory

Al-Shabaab militants (file photo)

Somali police on November 27 launched an investigation after 20 foreigners, who were claiming to be fishermen who had been held hostage for years, were discovered near territory controlled by the Al-Shabaab militant group. Police spokesman Sadik Dudishe said the men -- 14 Iranians and six Pakistanis -- were apprehended for questioning after they wandered from a part of Galmudug state under militant control. "Some of these people were kidnapped by Al-Shabaab in 2014, while others were abducted on the Harardhere coast, near Qosol-tire, in southern Somalia in mid-2019," Dudishe said.

Prominent Iranian Actress Reportedly Released After Arrest For Supporting Protests

Hengameh Ghaziani was arrested by security forces on November 20. (file photo)

Iranian actress Hengameh Ghaziani, who was detained last week after expressing support for anti-government protesters, has been released from custody, state news agency ISNA reported on November 27.

Ghaziani, a film and theater actress, was arrested by security forces on November 20 along with fellow actress Katayoun Riahi after they removed their head scarves in public in an apparent act of defiance against the regime.

ISNA did not give details of Ghaziani's release or mention Riahi’s status in its report.

Reports by human rights organizations indicate that more than 15,000 people have been detained during protests that have swept the country since 22-year-old Mahsa Amini died in September after being detained for allegedly improperly wearing a head scarf.

Authorities have said Amini died from a sudden heart attack while denying claims by activists that she was beaten.

Riahi was one of the first Iranian celebrities to remove her hijab in protest of Amini's death, while Ghaziani published pictures of herself standing on a Tehran street without a hijab and tying her hair in a ponytail. Tying one's hair in a ponytail in public has become an act of defiance in Iran in recent weeks.

Ghaziani and Riahi were detained after being summoned by prosecutors in a probe into their "provocative" social media posts and media activity, the state-run IRNA news agency said at the time.

The moves came amid a brutal crackdown by the government after weeks of unrest -- one of the deepest challenges to the Islamic regime since the revolution in 1979 -- that erupted following the September 16 death of Amini.

Prior to her arrest, Ghaziani posted along with her photos a statement saying that "maybe this is my last post. From this moment on, whatever happens to me, know that I am with the People of Iran until the last breath."

Earlier in an Instagram posting, Ghaziani called Iran a "child-killing state."

Many members of the Iranian cinematic and artistic community have been summoned and interrogated by security agencies for supporting protesters.

Prior to the recent wave of nationwide protests, three prominent Iranian cinematographers -- Mostafa al-Ahmad, Mohammad Rasulof, and Jafar Panahi -- were arrested after they joined a group of more than 300 Iranian filmmakers in calling on the security forces to "lay down arms" in the face of public outrage over "corruption, theft, inefficiency, and repression" following a building collapse in May in the city of Abadan, which killed 41 people.

The Islamic Revolutionary Court of Tehran on October 3 announced a sentence of six years against Ahmad.

Panahi and Rasoulov reportedly have been in Tehran's notorious Evin prison for several months.

Iran Arrests Khamenei's Niece After She Condemns 'Murderous Regime'

Farideh Moradkhani (file photo)

Iranian authorities have arrested a niece of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei after she recorded a video describing the authorities led by her uncle as a "murderous and child-killing regime.” Farideh Moradkhani comes from a branch of the family that has a record of opposition to Iran's clerical leadership and has herself been jailed previously in the country. Her brother, Mahmoud Moradkhani, wrote on Twitter that she was arrested on November 23 after going to the office of the prosecutor following a summons. Then, on November 27, her brother posted a video on YouTube in which she condemned the "clear and obvious oppression" Iranians have been subjected to.

Iran Charges Dissident Rapper Toomaj Salehi With Spreading 'Corruption On Earth'

A U.S.-based rights group said Toomaj Salehi's trial had begun "without a lawyer of his choice," and his family said his "life is at serious risk.” (file photo)

Iran’s judiciary has charged dissident rapper Toomaj Salehi with spreading “corruption on Earth,” a serious offense that could result in a death sentence in the Islamic republic.

Isfahan’s judicial chief, Asadollah Jafari, was quoted on November 27 as saying that Salehi faces other charges, including “propaganda activity against the establishment, forming an illegal group with the intention of disrupting the security of the country, cooperating with hostile governments, and spreading lies and inciting others to commit violence.”

A U.S.-based rights group said on November 26 that Toomaj Salehi's trial had begun "without a lawyer of his choice," and his family said his "life is at serious risk.”


But Jafari said no court session has been held so far for Salehi, who was arrested in late October after denouncing the clerical establishment and expressing support for the protests triggered by the death in custody of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini.

His detention came shortly after he told the Canadian Broadcasting Cooperation: "You are dealing with a mafia that is ready to kill the entire nation...in order to keep its power, money and weapons."

State media then published a video purporting to show the rapper blindfolded and apologizing for his words. Family members and supporters accused the authorities of torturing Salehi in prison to force him to make a false confession.

Family members have expressed concern about Salehi’s health and the charges against him. Earlier this month, over 100 musicians, poets, artists, and activists called for his release.

Salehi, 32, gained notoriety for lyrics that rail against corruption, widespread poverty, state executions, and the killing of protesters in Iran. His songs also point to a widening gap between ordinary Iranians and the country’s leadership, accusing authorities of “suffocating” the people without regard for their well-being.

Last year, Salehi was arrested at his home after releasing several protest songs. A few days later, the rapper was released on bail amid widespread condemnation of his arrest by his supporters and by rights groups.

Salehi is among thousands, including protesters as well as journalists, lawyers, artists, athletes, activists and others arrested in Iran’s ongoing state crackdown on the antiestablishment protests that have rocked the country for the past two months. Iran's judiciary says more than 2,000 people have been charged since the start of the protests.

With reporting by AFP

At World Cup, U.S. Soccer Scrubs Islamic Emblem From Iranian Flag

An Iranian fans hold a "Woman. Life. Freedom" flag and a shirt in memory of Mahsa Amini before the Iran-Wales match on November 25.

The U.S. soccer federation briefly displayed Iran's national flag on social media without the emblem of the Islamic republic, saying the move supports protesters in Iran ahead of the two nations' World Cup match on November 29. Iran's government reacted by accusing America of removing the name of God from their national flag. The decision by the U.S. Soccer Federation adds yet another political firestorm to the Middle East's first World Cup, one which organizers had hoped would be spared off-the-field controversies. To read the original story from AP, click here.

Iran Bank Manager Reportedly Fired For Serving Unveiled Woman

Women in the country of more than 80 million people are required to cover their heads, necks, and hair, a law enforced by the country's morality police. (file photo)

An Iranian bank manager who served an unveiled woman has been fired, local media reported on November 27, as demonstrations triggered by the mandatory head-covering rule shake the Islamic republic. Women in the country of more than 80 million people are required to cover their heads, necks, and hair, a law enforced by the country's morality police. The September 16 death in morality police custody of Mahsa Amini, 22, for allegedly breaching the dress code rules sparked nationwide demonstrations, which authorities call "riots.” Mehr news agency reported that the bank manager in Qom Province, near the capital, Tehran, "had provided bank services on November 24 to an unveiled woman.” To read the story from AFP, click here.

Queiroz Tells Klinsmann To Quit FIFA Role Over 'Outrageous' Iran Rebuke

Iranian players celebrate with coach Carlos Queiroz after the match against Wales on November 25.

Iran's coach Carlos Queiroz lambasted German soccer icon Juergen Klinsmann for criticizing his team's World Cup conduct, calling his remarks a "disgrace to football" and urging him to resign from his role with world governing body FIFA. In comments as an analyst with broadcaster BBC, 1990 World Cup winner Klinsmann accused Iran of systematic gamesmanship during their stunning 2-0 stoppage time win over Wales on November 25 and said Queiroz's record with other national teams made him the right match for Iran. "That's their culture and that's their way of doing it and that's why Carlos Queiroz, he fits really well in the Iranian national team," said Klinsmann, a former United States coach. To read the original story from Reuters, click here.

Iranian Activist Hossein Ronaghi Released On Bail, Transferred To Hospital

Hossein Ronaghi has been transferred to a hospital after refusing to eat for 64 days, his father said.

Iranian authorities on November 26 released activist Hossein Ronaghi on bail, his brother said. Ronaghi was among thousands arrested in the crackdown on protests rocking the country over the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini after she was taken into custody by morality police for the alleged improper wearing of a head scarf. Concern had been growing about Ronaghi’s health after he went on a hunger strike last month. "Hossein was released tonight on bail to undergo treatment," Hossein Ronaghi's brother Hassan said on Twitter. Their father, Ahmad, said Ronaghi had been transferred to a hospital after refusing to eat for 64 days. To read the original story by RFE/RL’s Radio Farda, click here.

Cyberattack Hits Iran's Fars News Agency

The headquarter of the Fars news agency in Tehran (file photo)

Hackers have disrupted the work of Iran's Fars news agency, one of the main sources of news disseminated by the state during protests over the death of a young woman in police custody in September, the agency said. Fars said its website had been disrupted late on November 25 by a "complex hacking and cyberattack operation...Removing possible bugs...may cause problems for some agency services for a few days," it said in a statement posted on November 26 on its Telegram channel. To read the original story by AFP, click here.

Iran's Khamenei Praises Basij Forces For Confronting 'Riots'

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei (file photo)

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said in a televised speech on November 26 that Basij militia forces sacrificed their lives in "riots" sparked by the death in custody of a young Iranian Kurdish woman in September. The Basij force, affiliated with the country's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, has been at the forefront of the state crackdown on protests that have spread across the country. To read the original story from Reuters, click here.

Iran Sends More Troops To Kurdish Region As New Protest Flares

Protesters take to the streets Zahedan, the capital of Sistan-Baluchistan Province.

Iran's Revolutionary Guards have built up their presence in restive Kurdish regions, state media reported on November 25 amid a crackdown on mass protests, as video showed demonstrations in minority Baluch areas of the southeast. Activist website 1500Tavsir posted footage it said was from protests in Zahedan, the capital of Sistan-Baluchistan Province, with the sound of gunshots and, in one video, demonstrators running for cover. Reuters could not independently verify their authenticity. To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

Rights Groups Say Iran Forcing Families To Bury Dead At Night

Shamal Khediri, 32, was reportedly targeted with direct fire by the IRGC during the bloody suppression of protests in the northwestern Iranian city of Mahabad. He died on November 24.

Human rights groups say Iranian authorities have forced the family of one of the victims killed by security forces during protests in the Kurdish city of Mahabad to bury their son's body in the middle of the night under strict security measures.

The France-based Kurdistan Human Rights Network claimed in a report on November 25 that forces from the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) targeted 32-year-old Shamal Khediri with direct fire last week during the bloody suppression of protests in the northwestern Iranian city of Mahabad. He died after being transferred to hospital on November 24.

The Norway-based Hengaw rights group said that after handing over Khediri's body to his family, several security forces escorted them to Mahabad and forced them to bury his body "in the middle of the night."

Activists say the increasingly violent suppression of protesters in western Iran is an attempt by authorities to create fear among protesters and quell the nationwide protests that have rocked the country since 22-year-old Mahsa Amini died on September 16 while in police custody for allegedly wearing a head scarf improperly.

They added that forcing families to bury those killed by security forces is an attempt to cover up the incidents and limit the chances of funerals turning into massive demonstrations.

The Kurdistan Human Rights Network and Hengaw, two groups that monitor the human rights situation in Kurdistan Province, reported on November 25 that Heman Aman, a man from the Iranian-Kurdish city of Bukan, was tortured to death after being shot and kidnapped by government forces.

According to the reports, the 26-year-old Aman died on November 23 "as a result of severe torture by agents of the Urmia Intelligence Department" at a detention center.

The report added that Aman's body was also buried at the middle of the night under the pressure of security forces after being handed over to his family.

The IRGC has accused Kurdish groups of "attacking and infiltrating Iran to sow insecurity and riots and spread unrest" amid protests that erupted over Amini's death.

Anger over Amini's death has prompted thousands of Iranians to take to the streets to demand more freedoms and women's rights. The widespread demonstrations represent the biggest threat to the Islamic government since the 1979 revolution.

The activist HRANA news agency said that as of November 23, at least 445 protesters had been killed during the unrest, including 61 minors, as security forces try to stifle widespread dissent.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

Iran Rejects UN Probe Into Deadly Crackdown On Protests

A picture from social media purportedly showing an anti-government protest in Abdana in Ilam Province on November 17

Iran has rejected a decision by the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) to form a fact-finding committee to investigate human rights violations amid a violent crackdown on anti-government protests that erupted over the death of Mahsa Amini.

At a special session initiated by Germany on November 24 at the Geneva-based UNHRC, which has 47 members, the resolution was approved in a 25-6 vote, with 15 members abstaining.

The resolution provides for an independent investigative mission to document human rights violations in Iran in the context of the protests, which erupted in mid-September after the death of a young woman being held by police for allegedly improperly wearing a head scarf.

Tehran has blamed several Western countries of fomenting the protests even though it has not provided any evidence to back up its claim.

Following that narrative, the Foreign Ministry on November 25 rejected the probe as "an anti-Iran move by a small group of Western countries to impose a resolution on the Human Rights Council against Iran."

It added that it would not recognize the mission.

The death of 22-year-old Amini in Tehran on September 16 sparked the wave of unrest now sweeping across the country.

Officials said she died of natural causes, but eyewitnesses and Amini's family say she was beaten after being taken into custody by Iran's notorious morality police.

The government has since launched a brutal crackdown on protesters, especially in the western regions of Iran, where Amini was from.

At least 416 people, including 51 children, have been killed by security forces across the country, according to the Oslo-based Iran Human Rights (IHR) group. At least 83 people have been killed in Kurdistan, Kermanshah, and West Azerbaijan, three provinces with significant Kurdish populations, IHR said.

Despite Tehran's reaction, many countries and human rights groups welcomed the investigation, saying it will facilitate the gathering of evidence of human rights violations that could lead to the prosecution of criminals in international courts.

Secretary of State Anthony Blinken said the United States continues to support the people of Iran "in the face of this brutal repression and work to see to it that those engaged in the ongoing violent suppression are held accountable.”

German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock wrote on Twitter immediately after the UNHRC meeting that "the result is clear: unity for justice, for the people of Iran."

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

Iran Regime Supporters Confront Protesters At World Cup Game

Iran fans hold a banner reading "Women, Life, Freedom" inside the stadium during Iran's first match in the World Cup in Qatar on November 21.

Iran's political turmoil cast a shadow over Iran's second match in the World Cup on November 25, with pro-government fans harassing anti-government fans outside the stadium in Qatar. Unlike in their first match against England, the Iran players sang along to their national anthem before the match against Wales as some fans in the stadium wept. Some Iran fans confiscated Persian pre-revolutionary Iranian flags from supporters entering the stadium and shouted insults at those wearing shirts with the slogan of Iranian protest movement, Women, Life, Freedom. To read the original story from AP, click here.

Iran Arrests Outspoken Player Amid World Cup Scrutiny

Voria Ghafouri, former captain of Esteghlal Tehran, visits the daughter of Fereshteh Ahmadi, a woman who was killed in the protests in Kurdestan Province.

Iran arrested a prominent former member of its national soccer team on November 24 over his criticism of the government as authorities grapple with nationwide protests that have cast a shadow over its competition at the World Cup. The semiofficial Fars and Tasnim news agencies reported that Voria Ghafouri, who was not chosen to go to the World Cup, was arrested for “insulting the national soccer team and propagandizing against the government.” To see the original AP story, click here.

Iran Asks UN Security Council To Close Headquarters Of Kurdish Groups In Iraq

This video grab from September 29 reportedly shows a missile launch from the Iranian Kurdistan (Komalah) region directed toward Sulaimaniyah in Iraq's autonomous Kurdistan region.

Tehran has asked the United Nations Security Council to close the headquarters of Kurdish groups based in Iraq and disarm them for their "subversive actions" against Iran.

Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) had repeatedly fired on the headquarters of Iranian Kurdish opposition groups based in northern Iraq in recent months. Tehran accuses them of fomenting a wave of unrest inside Iran.

According to the semiofficial ISNA news agency, the Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic to the United Nations claimed in a letter to the Security Council on November 24 that the attacks on targets inside Iraq were carried out with the aim of "protecting national security" and defending against the "subversive and terrorist acts" of Kurdish groups.

Activists say the violence is an attempt by the authorities to create fear among protesters and quell the nationwide protests that have rocked the country since Mahsa Amini died on September 16 after being detained by police for allegedly wearing a head scarf improperly.

The IRGC has accused Kurdish groups of "attacking and infiltrating Iran to sow insecurity and riots and spread unrest" amid protests that erupted over Amini's death.

Anger over the death of the 22-year-old Amini has prompted thousands of Iranians to take to the streets to demand more freedoms and women's rights. The widespread demonstrations represent the biggest threat to the Islamic government since the 1979 revolution.

Kurdish parties opposing authorities in Iran have repeatedly announced in the past weeks that the Islamic republic is seeking to push its internal tensions outside its borders by attacking parts of Iraq.

Khaled Azizi, the spokesman of the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan, said in an exclusive interview with RFE/RL's Radio Farda that the party "will not be drawn into the armed war that the government of the Islamic republic is seeking and supports the peaceful protests held by the people of Iran."

"The Islamic republic intends to make the people of Kurdistan an imaginary enemy for the whole of Iran because it has no solution to confront the struggle of the Iranians," Azizi added.

Iran's letter to the UN Security Council was sent on a day when the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) is scheduled to hold a special session about the ongoing protests in Iran and the harsh crackdown launched by authorities on the protesters.

Germany initiated the special session of the UNHRC, which has 47 members, in order to discuss the human rights violations that have taken place during the nationwide protests in Iran.

A resolution is set to be introduced at the November 24 session that will call on Iran to end repression and violence against its own people. The resolution also provides for an independent investigative mission to document human rights violations in Iran in the context of the protests.

At least 416 people, including 51 children, have been killed by security forces across the country, according to the Oslo-based Iran Human Rights (IHR) group. At least 83 people have been killed in Kurdistan, Kermanshah, and West Azerbaijan, three provinces with significant Kurdish populations, IHR said.

Activist reports also indicate that hundreds of people have been arrested and scores injured, with many people missing after being detained by security forces.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

Australia, Netherlands Confirm Citizens Detained In Iran, Access Denied

Protesters hold a vigil for 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Sydney, Australia, on September 25.

Australia and the Netherlands have confirmed the arrests of dual nationals in Iran and say the detainees have been denied consular access.

A spokesperson for Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs on November 24 said an Iranian-Australian had been detained, though not for participating in protests over the death of a young woman while in police custody for allegedly wearing a head scarf improperly that are sweeping across Iran.

The Netherlands made a similar announcement late on November 23 saying one of its citizens had been detained in Iran. It gave no further details.

Both countries confirmed their officials had been denied consular access to the detainees.

Australia’s Department for Foreign Affairs noted that Iran refuses to accept the right of consular access in such cases because Tehran does not recognize dual citizenship.

Many countries have urged their citizens to leave Iran because of the high risk of arbitrary detention.

The arrests come amid widespread protests in Iran since the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini while in the custody of Iran's morality police after being detained for "improperly" wearing the hijab, a mandatory head scarf.

Iran has repeatedly accused outside forces of stoking the protests without showing any evidence to back up its claim.

Earlier this week, Judiciary spokesman Massoud Setayeshi told reporters that 40 foreign nationals were among those who have been detained during the unrest, which began after Amini's death on September 16.

Some reports by human rights organizations indicate that more than 15,000 people overall have been detained during the nationwide protests.

The activist group Iran Human Rights said on November 23 that "at least" 416 people, including 51 children and 27 women, have been killed by security forces in the ongoing nationwide protests.

Iranian Brigadier General Ahmad Vahidi said that some foreigners arrested during the protests had played "a major role" in the unrest. He said these people "are in the hands of the judiciary and are to be dealt with according to the law."

Western countries have repeatedly charged that Iran is taking dual nationals and foreigners into custody on false charges for the sole purpose of using them in prisoner swaps.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda
Updated

UN, Diplomats Demand End To Deadly Iran Crackdown

A scene from an anti-government protest in Andimeshk, Iran, on November 22.

The bloody repression of peaceful demonstrators in Iran must end, the UN rights chief insisted on November 24, as countries discussed launching an investigation into Tehran's deadly crackdown. Volker Turk opened an emergency session of the UN Human Rights Council, where countries were called to discuss Iran's "deteriorating human rights situation" and determine if a high-level international investigation is warranted. The meeting follows two months of protests in Iran sparked by the death in custody of Mahsa Amini, after she was arrested for an alleged breach of the country's strict dress rules for women based on Islamic sharia law. To read the original story from AFP, click here.

Jailed Rights Advocate Asks UN To Document 'Killing And Repression' In Iran

Narges Mohammadi was briefly released from prison for medical treatment in February.

A prominent Iranian human rights advocate incarcerated in the notorious Evin prison has published a letter saying that Iran's authoritarian theocracy has prevented people from achieving their rights, including democracy and freedom, and a normal relationship with the world.

Narges Mohammadi sent the letter on November 23 to the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC), whose mission is to promote and protect human rights around the world. Mohammadi's letter was published a day before a special meeting of the council on Iran.

Mohammadi asks the council to "document the repression and killing of the Islamic republic" and requests "permanent supervision of the UNHRC on the government's behavior" to include respect for human rights in relations of the government.

Mohammadi's letter also notes the high number of prisoners and says that brave and innocent young people are killed every day in the streets.

"They have gone from killing women to killing children, but people's resistance continues," she says in the letter.

Anger over the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini while in police custody in September has prompted thousands of Iranians to take to the streets to demand more freedoms and women's rights. The widespread demonstrations represent the biggest threat to the Islamic government since the 1979 revolution.

Germany initiated the special session of the UNHRC, which has 47 members, in order to discuss the human rights violations that have taken place during the nationwide protests in Iran.

A resolution is set to be introduced at the November 24 session that will call on Iran to end the repression and violence against its own people. The resolution also provides for an independent investigative mission to document human rights violations in Iran in the context of the protests.

At least 416 people, including 51 children, have been killed by security forces across the country, according to the Oslo-based Iran Human Rights group.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

U.S. Places Sanctions On Iranian Officials Amid Crackdown On Protests

Iranian protesters rally in the western city of Sanandaj.

The United States has targeted three Iranian security officials under human rights-related sanctions, the U.S. Treasury Department said on November 23, citing Tehran's ongoing crackdown on protesters and "increased aggressive actions against the Iranian people." To read the original story from Reuters, click here.

Iranian Rights Groups Say Dozens Killed In Kurdish Region In Police Crackdown

Three Iranian girls show their solidarity with protesters in the Kurdish city of Mahabad earlier this month amid the nationwide protests.

Human rights sources say that dozens of people have been killed by Iranian security agents in recent weeks as a deadly crackdown intensifies in the country's western Kurdistan region, which has been the epicenter of anti-establishment protests that have raged for months following the death of a young woman in police custody.

Hengaw, a Norway-based group that monitors rights violations in Iran's Kurdish regions, reported that the security forces killed at least 42 Kurdish citizens between November 15 to November 21 while using live ammunition against protesters.

The France-based Kurdistan Human Rights Network wrote in a report that government forces killed at least 14 Kurdish citizens in the cities of Javanrud, Piranshahr, Sanandaj, Dehgolan, and Bukan during three days from November 19 to 21.

Activists say the violence is an attempt by the authorities to create fear among protesters and quell the nationwide protests that have rocked the country since Mahsa Amini died on September 16 after being detained by police for allegedly wearing a head scarf improperly.

What began as protests against the brutal enforcement of the mandatory head scarf has snowballed into one of the biggest threats to Iran's clerical establishment since the Islamic Revolution in 1979.

At least 378 people, including 47 children, have been killed by security forces across the country, according to the Oslo-based Iran Human Rights (IHR) group. At least 83 people have been killed in Kurdistan, Kermanshah, and West Azerbaijan, three provinces with significant Kurdish populations, IHR said.

Activist reports also indicate that hundreds of people have been arrested and scores injured, with many people missing after being detained by security forces.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

Iran Says IRGC Colonel Killed In Roadside Bombing Attack In Syria

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei meets with the IRGC members involved in the arrest of U.S. sailors in the Persian Gulf in January 2016.

Iran says that Colonel Davoud Jafari, a senior commander with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC), has been killed in Syria by a roadside bomb in an attack Tehran blamed on Israel.

The IRGC-affiliated Tasnim news agency on November 23 published a statement from the group in which it said Jafari was an adviser to the IRGC's aerospace division. The statement added that Israel was responsible for the operation, though it presented no evidence to back up the claim.

Tasnim published a photo of Jafari next to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, which showed that he was involved in the arrest of U.S. sailors in the Persian Gulf in January 2016.

Independent sources have not yet confirmed the Tasnim report and Israel has not reacted to it either.

Tehran admits it has provided military support to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's forces in a civil war since at least 2012 in the form of military advisers and volunteers, but denies sending its own troops.

Even so, Iranian media have reported the death of a handful of Iranian commanders along with hundreds of Iranian fighters in Syria.

Iran and Israel have been engaged in a shadow war for years, worsening already strained relations between them.

Further heightening tensions are deadlocked negotiations aimed at reviving the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers.

In the absence of a deal that would curb Iran's sensitive nuclear activities in exchange for the lifting of U.S. sanctions, Tehran has reduced its commitments and expanded its nuclear activities, raising concern in Israel.

The news of Jafari's death comes after an Israeli official blamed Iran for a November 15 strike on the Pacific Zircon tanker, which is managed by Israeli-controlled Eastern Pacific Shipping.

Tehran has also accused Israel of carrying out a recent spate of assassinations and sabotage attacks inside the Islamic republic.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

The Farda Briefing: Iranian Officials Claim Foreign Enemies Are Plotting A Civil War; Analysts Say Tehran Is To Blame  

A screen-grab from a video taken earlier this month that apparently shows protesters throwing a small explosive device at a banner depicting the Islamic republic's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in the central city of Isfahan.

Welcome back to The Farda Briefing, an RFE/RL newsletter that tracks the key issues in Iran and explains why they matter. To subscribe, click here.

I'm RFE/RL correspondent Golnaz Esfandiari. Here's what I’ve been following during the past week and what I’m watching for in the days ahead.

The Big Issue

Authorities in Tehran have accused Iran's foreign enemies of stoking unrest in the country with the goal of inciting a civil war.

Officials made the accusations following what they called “terrorist” attacks that took place on November 16 in Izeh, in the southwestern province of Khuzestan, and in the central city of Isfahan, where they said gunmen on motorbikes opened fire on security forces and civilians, killing seven in Izeh and two in Isfahan.

The incidents followed an October 26 attack at the Shah Cheragh shrine in Shiraz that left 13 dead. The Shiraz attack was claimed by the extremist group Islamic State (IS).

Speaking on November 18, Mohsen Rezai, Iran's vice president for economic affairs, blamed Tehran's enemies for the “bitter” incidents and claimed that they’re trying to create a civil war in the country. "Iran cannot be turned into another Syria or Lebanon by carrying out violent acts similar to the ones in Shah Cheragh, Isfahan, and Izeh," he said.

A day earlier, Iran's Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abollahian accused Israel and Western countries of plotting a "civil war" and the “disintegration” of the Islamic republic.

“Security services, [Israel], and Western politicians who have made plans for a civil war and the destruction and disintegration of Iran must know that that Iran is not Libya or Sudan,” Amir-Abdollahian said on Twitter, while failing to provide any evidence to back his claim.

Why It Matters: The warnings come amid nine weeks of antiestablishment protests in Iran triggered by the death of Mahsa Amini following her arrest by the morality police in Tehran. Iran has blamed foreign countries and intelligence services of orchestrating the unrest, which has turned into the most significant challenge to the clerical establishment in the past four decades.

Ali Alfoneh, an Iran analyst at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington, told RFE/RL that the Islamic republic has only itself to blame for the situation it faces, “but lacking the courage to look into the mirror and admit their own mistakes, regime officials cowardly blame the foreign powers.”

Others said Tehran could use the attacks as an excuse for a harsher crackdown on the protests. “We don't have a good sense of what happened in Izeh and Isfahan -- was it a terrorist group, or potentially the regime itself?" said Henry Rome, an Iran expert at the Washington Institute. "Either way, the government will probably use the attacks to send the message that the protests are undermining national security and opening the door for Western-backed terrorism," Rome added.

What’s Next: Statements by Iranian officials who have vowed a crushing response to those behind the "terrorist" attacks could provide clues about the country’s next steps. Authorities have said that the perpetrators of the attacks and their leaders who are allegedly based outside the country would be "introduced to the people."

Stories You Might Have Missed

• Activists say Iran has intensified its crackdown in the Kurdistan region in an attempt to spread fear among protesters and quell the nationwide antiestablishment protests that have rocked the country for the past two months.

• At least 47 children have been killed amid Iran’s ongoing crackdown on the protests that were sparked by the death in custody of Mahsa Amini. Among them is 9-year-old Kian Pirfalak who was killed on November 16 in the southwestern city of Izeh amid the antiestablishment protests. State media claimed that the boy was killed in a "terrorist attack." But his mother says he was shot dead by Iranian security forces. His tragic death led to an outpouring of grief and anger.

• Protesters in Iran set fire to the ancestral home of the Islamic republic's late founder, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, in the central Iranian city of Khomein, according to amateur videos posted online. Images of Khomeini have also been torched in past weeks amid the ongoing unrest.

What We're Watching

Iran said on November 22 that it had begun producing uranium enriched to 60 percent at its Fordo underground facility. The announcement was part of Iran's response to the UN nuclear watchdog's adoption last week of a resolution accusing Tehran of noncooperation. Tehran condemned the resolution as politically motivated while vowing retaliation.

"We had said that Iran would seriously react to any resolution and political pressure...that is why Iran has started enriching uranium to 60 percent purity as of Monday [November 21] at the Fordo site," the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, Mohammad Eslami, was quoted as saying by state media.

Why It Matters: Enrichment at 60 percent is one step away from the 90 percent level required for nuclear weapons. Iran had already been enriching to 60 percent purity at other facilities.

The 2015 nuclear deal -- which has been on life support following the U.S. withdrawal from the international agreement in May 2018 -- had limited Iran’s nuclear enrichment activities to 3.7 percent for civilian purposes.

Tehran’s latest escalation is likely to lead to more concerns about the country’s nuclear activities from other countries that were party to the stalled nuclear deal and are working to revive it. The EU trio of Britain, France and Germany said in a joint statement that Iran’s increased enrichment “carries significant proliferation-related risks [and] has no credible civilian justification.”

That's all from me for now. Don't forget to send me any questions, comments, or tips that you have.

Until next time,

Golnaz Esfandiari

If you enjoyed this briefing and don't want to miss the next edition, subscribe here. It will be sent to your inbox every Wednesday.

Britain Says Russia Has Nearly Exhausted Its Stock Of Iranian-Made Drones

Britain said Russia is likely using the UAVs to make up for a "severe shortage" of cruise missiles.

Russia has likely launched hundreds of Iranian-manufactured unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) against Ukraine since September, Britain's Ministry of Defense said on in its daily intelligence update on November 23. It's also likely that Russia has nearly exhausted its current stock of Iranian-made weapons and will seek resupply, the ministry said. It said Russia is likely using the UAVs to make up for a "severe shortage" of cruise missiles, but that the strategy has not been effective, as most UAVs have been shot down.

Iranian Lawmakers Propose Punishments For Protesting Students

Lawmakers have also proposed a fine under which protesting students would be required to pay their entire tuition. According to the Iranian Constitution, education in public universities is free.

Iranian lawmakers have proposed banning student protesters from traveling abroad for 10 years as the Islamic republic struggles to suppress the biggest show of dissent in years.

The Fars news agency, which is affiliated with Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC), said that in addition to members of parliament some "experts" played a role in the preparation of this plan. No explanation was given about the "experts," but some observers say they appear to be agents of the intelligence and security institutions.

This plan was presented days after Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei spoke about the "immodesty" of the demonstrators.

During recent protests, some students, including those at the prestigious Sharif University in Tehran, attacked Khamenei with strongly negative slogans.

The proposal comes after 227 lawmakers from Iran's 290-seat, hard-liner-led parliament urged the judiciary to approve the death sentence for some protesters arrested amid a wave of demonstrations across the country sparked by the death of a young woman in September while in police custody for allegedly wearing a head scarf improperly.

Radical political activist and former lawmaker Hamid Rasaei, referring to the students' desire to continue their studies abroad, suggested on Twitter a ban on student protesters leaving the country in order to calm the protests in the university.

The International Monetary Fund says more than 150,000 educated Iranians leave the country each year in hopes of finding a better life abroad.

Earlier this month, students at Sharif University staged a demonstration, singing one of the protest anthems that refers to the high number of students who leave Iran, asking them "to stay and take the country back."

Lawmakers have also proposed a fine under which protesting students would be required to pay their entire tuition. According to the Iranian Constitution, education in public universities is free.

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini on September 16 has prompted thousands of Iranians to take to the streets to demand more freedoms and women's rights in the biggest threat to the Islamic government since the 1979 revolution.

Several thousand people have been arrested, including many protesters, journalists, lawyers, activists, digital rights defenders, and others. At least 378 people, including 47 minors, have been killed by government forces across the country, according to the Oslo-based Iran Human Rights.

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