Accessibility links

Breaking News

Mattis Says U.S. Needs To 'Up Its Game' In Arctic Amid Russian, Chinese Moves


Russian servicemen guard an area at the Nagurskoye military base in Alexandra Land on the remote Arctic islands of Franz Josef Land in March 2017.

The United States needs to "up its game" in the Arctic, which is an increasingly important region as global warming opens up new sea lanes and makes oil and mineral resources there more readily available, the U.S. defense secretary has said.

The Arctic, which lies partly within the territories of Russia, the United States, Canada, and a handful of other countries, by some estimates holds more oil and natural gas reserves than Saudi Arabia and Russia, and Moscow has been intensifying its energy development there.

Russia has also embarked upon its biggest military push in the Arctic since the 1991 fall of the Soviet Union, beefing up its military presence and capabilities.

Under President Vladimir Putin, Moscow is moving to re-open abandoned Soviet military, air, and radar bases on remote Arctic islands and build new ones as it pushes ahead with a claim to almost half a million square miles of the Arctic.

U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis
U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis

"Certainly America’s got to up its game in the Arctic. There's no doubt about that," U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters in Alaska before leaving on a trip to Asia.

Part of that would be an increased Coast Guard presence, with more icebreakers and other specialized vessels needed in the Arctic, he said.

Mattis said the Pentagon already relied on Alaska as a base for operations in the Pacific, and the interceptor missiles the United States maintains there already constitute the cornerstone of the U.S. homeland defense.

But he said but the warming of the Arctic had spurred a new rush for resources in the region that the United States has been reluctant to join.

"So the reality is that we’re going to have to deal with the developing Arctic... It is also going to open not just to transport but also to energy exploration," Mattis said.

The United States and Russia have both expressed interest in boosting Arctic drilling, but Russia has gone further in developing its Arctic resources. Currently, the United States prohibits oil drilling in wildlife refuges in its Alaskan Arctic wilderness areas and most offshore areas.

Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev visit the remote Arctic islands of Franz Josef Land on March 29, 2017.
Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev visit the remote Arctic islands of Franz Josef Land on March 29, 2017.

Beyond the competition between Russia and the United States, earlier this year China outlined ambitions to extend President Xi Jinping's signature Belt and Road Initiative to the Arctic by developing shipping lanes that have been opened up by global warming.

China also has been helping Greenland, whose territory covers a major portion of the Arctic, develop its vast, mostly untapped mineral resources.

China itself has no Arctic territory or coastline, so its increasing interest in the region has prompted concerns from Arctic states over its long-term strategic objectives, including whether that includes military deployment.

Alaskan Senator Dan Sullivan, standing alongside Mattis, said there was bipartisan support in the U.S. Congress to view the Arctic in more strategic terms.

"I agree with the secretary, I think we're behind, but I think we're finally starting to catch up," Sullivan said.

Studies show that much of the oil and gas resources in the Arctic is concentrated in Alaska, which the United States purchased from the Russian Empire in 1867 for $7.2 million. It became the 49th U.S. state in 1959.

With reporting by Reuters and Alaska Public Media
XS
SM
MD
LG