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U.S. Senate Report Calls For Stronger Response To Russian Meddling


The report was authored by staffers working for Democratic members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and commissioned by the panel's lead Democrat, Ben Cardin (pictured), an outspoken critic of the Kremlin.

A new report compiled by U.S. Senate researchers warns that Russia has been emboldened by its efforts to interfere in U.S. and European elections, and calls for a stronger U.S. response to deter Moscow.

The report, released on January 10 by staff members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, listed a series of policy recommendations to counter what it called "Russian President Vladimir Putin's nearly two-decade-long assault on democratic institutions, universal values, and the rule of law across Europe and in his own country."

The Kremlin's spokesman on January 11 denied the accusations in the report, calling them "absolutely unfounded" and "paranoid."

The document highlighted various efforts by European governments to counter what researchers called Kremlin policies.

For the United States, the report calls for establishing a single government body to coordinate the U.S. response to Kremlin operations, publicizing assets and wealth held by Kremlin officials and politically connected businessmen in the West, and formalizing various Russia-related sanctions programs into a single designation: "State Hybrid Threat Actor."

Other recommendations include working more closely with U.S. allies in Europe on a joint approach to deterring Russia and cyberthreats, pressing social-media companies like Facebook and Twitter to be more transparent in political advertising, and reducing European imports of Russian natural gas and oil.

But the report also strongly criticizes President Donald Trump's administration, saying its response has emboldened Moscow.

"Never before in American history has so clear a threat to national security been so clearly ignored by a U.S. president," it says.

The White House did not respond to requests for reaction to the report.

In the past, Trump officials have given mixed messages about how to deal with Russia, with Trump himself espousing more conciliatory policies, while others backing stronger responses, including financial sanctions and more U.S. military weaponry for European allies.

The Republican-controlled Congress, meanwhile, has pushed forward with Russia-related legislation, largely in response to the U.S. intelligence agencies' finding that Moscow actively meddled in the 2016 presidential election.

In August, lawmakers passed the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act overwhelmingly and the measure was reluctantly signed into law by Trump.

Russia has repeatedly denied any effort to interfere in the 2016 presidential election.

On January 8, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov rejected assertions by CIA chief Mike Pompeo that Moscow planned to meddle in the November 2018 elections that will determine whether the Republicans retain control over both houses of Congress.

The report was authored by staffers working for Democratic members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and commissioned by the panel's lead Democrat, Ben Cardin, an outspoken critic of the Kremlin.

Asked at a briefing on January 9 why Republican committee staffers or members were not involved in the report, staffers insisted that Republicans would be supportive its findings and recommendations.

With reporting by AP and AFP
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