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Pakistan Arrests Suspect Linked To Times Square Bomber

Times Square bomb suspect Faisal Shahzad
U.S. media say Pakistan has arrested someone who said he helped the accused Times Square bomber.

"The Washington Post" reports the suspect provided an "independent stream" of evidence that the Pakistani Taliban was behind the attack.

The paper quoted U.S. intelligence officials as saying the suspect also admitted helping Faisal Shahzad, the suspect in the attempted Times Square bombing, travel into Pakistan's tribal areas for bomb training.

The paper said authorities have been examining phone records, e-mails, and other communications for evidence of links between Shahzad and the Pakistani Taliban.

The report comes after U.S. investigators on May 13 arrested three people linked to Shahzad during raids in suburbs of New York, Boston, and Philadelphia.

(Reuters)

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Iranian Student Council Says 11 Professors Fired For Protest Support

Universities and students have long been at the forefront of the struggle for greater social and political freedoms in Iran. (file photo)

Almost a dozen Iranian university professors have been fired from their jobs at Ferdowsi University in the northeastern city of Mashhad following their support for students in nationwide protests over the death of Mahsa Amini while in police custody.

The Union Council of Iranian Students said 11 professors were dismissed for "accompanying, supporting, and defending the rights of students."

The council, which did not reveal the names of the professors, said six were from the faculty of literature, three from the faculty of law and political science, and one each from the mathematics and economics faculties.

Anger over the 22-year-old Amini's death on September 16 has prompted thousands of Iranians to take to the streets to demand more freedoms and women's rights.

Numerous protests have been held at universities, particularly in Tehran, where many students have refused to attend class. Protesting students have chanted "Woman, life, freedom" and "Death to the dictator" at the rallies. Some female students have removed and burned their head scarves.

In most of the protests, students have asked professors to support them, and some university professors and lecturers have expressed solidarity with the protesters.

Universities and students have long been at the forefront of the struggle for greater social and political freedoms in Iran. In 1999, students protested the closure of a reformist daily, prompting a brutal raid on the dorms of Tehran University that left one student dead.

Over the years, the authorities have arrested student activists and leaders, sentencing them to prison and banning them from studying.

The activist HRANA news agency said that as of January 26 at least 700 university students had been arrested during the recent unrest.

Many have faced sentences such as imprisonment, flogging, and dozens of students have been expelled from universities or suspended from their studies, as security forces try to stifle widespread dissent.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

Saakashvili Tells Georgian Court He Wants 'Opportunity For Adequate Treatment'

Mikheil Saakashvili appears in court for his trial in Tbilisi via video link on February 1.

TBILISI -- Jailed former Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, who is being treated in a private clinic in Tbilisi for health problems, has asked for "the opportunity for adequate treatment" during a court hearing on having his sentence suspended so he can be transferred abroad for more intensive care.

The imprisoned ex-president has been treated at the Vivamedi facility since May 2022. Doctors said earlier this month that Saakashvili contracted a mild form of COVID and therefore does not need treatment in intensive care.

Saakashvili, who was Georgian president from 2004 to 2013, is serving a six-year sentence for abuse of power, a charge that he and his supporters say was politically motivated.

His medical team says his health has worsened significantly since he went to prison in October 2021 and staged repeated hunger strikes to protest his incarceration. He is also currently on trial on separate charges of violently dispersing an anti-government rally in November 2007 and illegal border crossing.

He has rejected those charges as well, calling them trumped-up, and his legal team is seeking to have the trial postponed for health reasons.

"I gave Georgia all my knowledge and creativity...the only thing I ask for is to give me the opportunity for adequate treatment," he told the court on February 1 via video link from the clinic where he is being treated.

During his address to the court, which was severely hampered by technical issues, Saakashvili lifted his hospital dress to reveal his emaciated physical condition. The judge quickly stopped the video transmission and asked the former president to appear only fully clothed.

The court hearing came a day after Saakashvili's associates said the former president had been transferred to an intensive-care unit, a claim hospital personnel rejected.

Saakashvili's mother, Giuli Alasania, said earlier in the day that her son, who was diagnosed with COVID several days ago, "again fell unconscious" overnight and that his body temperature had risen to 39 degrees Celsius.

Medical personnel did not confirm her statement and hospital director Nino Nadiradze told RFE/RL's Georgian Service that the former leader had not been moved.

On January 28, Vivamedi's chief physician, Zurab Chkhaidze, told journalists that Saakashvili had dramatically reduced food consumption and was rejecting medical treatment. Chkhaidze then called on Saakashvili's relatives to convince the ex-president to obey the doctors' recommendations.

In early December, Saakashvili's legal team distributed a medical report that said he had been "poisoned" with heavy metals while in custody and risked dying without proper treatment.

But Georgian officials have raised doubts about how critical his health situation is.

Tycoon Kolomoyskiy's Home Searched By Ukrainian Security Service

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy (left), meeting with Ihor Kolomoyskiy (right) in his office in Kyiv in September 2019, removed his citizenship in 2022.

Agents of the Ukrainian Security Service and the Bureau of Economic Security searched the home of billionaire businessman Ihor Kolomoyskiy on February 1, Ukrainian media reported, citing an unnamed official. The searches are in connection with alleged fraud at Ukrainian state-majority-owned Ukrnafta oil producer and oil refiner Ukrtatnafta. Authorities did not immediately reply to a request for comment from RFE/RL. Kolomoyskiy in 2020 was indicted in the United States on charges related to large-scale bank fraud. Last year he was deprived of Ukrainian citizenship by President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. To read the original article by RFE/RL's Ukrainian Service, click here.

Russian Journalist Nevzorov Sentenced To Nine Years For Comments On War

Aleksandr Nevzorov currently resides in an unspecified European Union member state. (file photo)

One of Russia's best-known TV journalists, Aleksandr Nevzorov, has been sentenced in absentia to eight years in prison for allegedly discrediting the armed forces involved in the unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.

Moscow's Basmanny district court handed down the sentence on February 1. The prosecutor had asked for a nine-year prison term for the Kremlin critic.

The Investigative Committee launched a probe into Nevzorov in March 2022 over statements he made on Instagram and YouTube that criticized the armed forces for a deadly assault on a nursing home in the Ukrainian city of Mariupol and the alleged torture and killing of civilians in the town of Bucha.

In May, a court in Moscow ordered that Nevzorov be detained for two months should he return to Russia.

Nevzorov's property in the northwestern Leningrad region was impounded in what the court said was a move to secure compensation for any possible fines Nevzorov will be ordered to pay if convicted.

Nevzorov is currently on tour across Canada with lectures about Russia's full-scale aggression against Ukraine. He currently resides in an unspecified European Union member state.

In June 2022, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy signed a decree granting Ukrainian citizenship to Nevzorov and his wife Lidia "for transcendental services" to Ukraine.

In the days after launching his invasion of Ukraine on February 24, President Vladimir Putin signed into law legislation that calls for lengthy prison terms for distributing "deliberately false information" about Russian military operations as the Kremlin seeks to control the narrative about its war in Ukraine.

The law envisages sentences of up to 10 years in prison for individuals convicted of an offense, while the penalty for the distribution of "deliberately false information" about the Russian military that leads to "serious consequences" is 15 years in prison.

It also makes it illegal "to make calls against the use of Russian troops to protect the interests of Russia" or "for discrediting such use" with a possible penalty of up to three years in prison. The same provision applies to calls for sanctions against Russia.

Nevzorov, who continues to sharply criticize Putin and his government over the Moscow-launched war in Ukraine on his YouTube channel, has rejected the charges, saying he has a right to express his own opinion.

Ukrainian Defenders Under Concentrated Attacks In East As Kyiv Lobbies For Warplanes

French military support staff walk towards a Rafale fighter jet. (file photo)

Russia has thrown fresh contingents of troops at Ukrainian positions in the east but failed to make notable advances, the Ukrainian military said on February 1, as Kyiv stepped up its efforts to convince its Western allies to give it fighter jets.

"The enemy has not paused its offensive actions in the Lyman and Bakhmut directions [in the eastern region of Donetsk," Ukraine's General Staff said in its daily report early on February 1, adding that Russian forces also conducted "unsuccessful offensives" in the Avdiyivka and Novopavlivka areas of Donestk as well, and "suffered great losses."

The information could not be independently verified.

Live Briefing: Russia's Invasion Of Ukraine

RFE/RL's Live Briefing gives you all of the latest developments on Russia's ongoing invasion, Kyiv's counteroffensive, Western military aid, global reaction, and the plight of civilians. For all of RFE/RL's coverage of the war, click here.

Russia has kept pressing its attacks on the town of Vuhledar, some 150 kilometers southeast of the fighting in and around Bakhmut, which has been the focal point of months of fighting in Donetsk.

The latest wave in the incessant Russian offensive came as Washington is preparing a fresh $2.2 billion package of military aid for Ukraine that is expected to give Kyiv longer-range missiles for the first time, as well as other munitions and weapons, according to two U.S. officials briefed on the matter who spoke to Reuters on January 31.

But the United States, which has given Kyiv some $27.2 billion in military aid since the start of Russia's unprovoked invasion almost one year ago, has so far been reluctant to provide warplanes for Ukraine.

U.S. President Joe Biden responded negatively when asked by reporters on January 30 if Washington would send F-16s.

On January 31, he told reporters that he and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy were "going to talk" but gave no further details.

France also gave mixed signals on the matter, with Defense Minister Sebastien Lecornu saying after talks in Paris on January 31 with Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov that "there was no taboo" about supplying Kyiv with fighter planes.

A day earlier, President Emmanuel Macron also told reporters that "nothing is excluded" when it comes to military assistance but offered no specifics.

But Reznikov voiced guarded optimism at a joint news conference with Lecornu on January 31, saying that all of Ukraine's requests were initially met with refusal by its allies, only to be eventually granted.

"In the beginning, all types of aid went through the 'no' phase. That means no as of today. The second stage: let's discuss, study the technical possibilities. Third stage: let's prepare your crews. And the fourth stage: take it. It happened with HIMARS, it happened with 155 mm artillery, the same with Bradley [fighting vehicles]," Reznikov said.

After months of reluctance, the United States and Germany agreed last month to send Abrams and Leopard 2 tanks, respectively, to Ukraine, while the United Kingdom earlier in January said it would send 14 Challenger 2 tanks.

Germany also allowed other countries, such as Norway and Poland to send their German-made Leopard 2 tanks to Ukraine.

WATCH: Ukrainian civilians come under shelling as they attempt to flee from Russian attacks in Bakhmut, in a video posted online by foreign volunteers.

Frontline Videos Show Intense Battles In Eastern Ukraine
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On January 31, Ukraine said it was expecting up to 140 modern tanks from its Western allies.

Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba gave the estimate, saying that 12 countries had promised more than 100 tanks after the U.S. and German opposition was lifted.

"Ukraine's armed forces will receive between 120 and 140 modern Western tanks," Kuleba said, describing the figure as the "first wave of contributions."

"These are Leopard 2, Challenger 2, M1 Abrams," Kuleba said, without specifying a timeline for the deliveries.

Kuleba noted too that Kyiv was "very much counting on" France to pass over to the Ukrainian military its Leclerc battle tank.

With reporting by Reuters and AFP

U.S. Official Asserts Sanctions Cutting Off Russian War Machine

Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Robin Dunnigan spoke to RFE/RL in Vilnius on January 31.

VILNIUS -- Western sanctions against Russia have been "very effective" in cutting off Russia's war machine, a U.S. official asserted, amid growing questions about Moscow's ability to circumvent the measures.

In an interview with RFE/RL, Robin Dunnigan, a deputy assistant U.S. secretary of state, said the economic sanctions imposed after Russia invaded Ukraine in February 2022 were putting pressure on Moscow, and "we will see the results of that in the coming months and years."

Russia's economy has been squeezed by the Western sanctions, contracting around 2.7 percent in 2022, according to Western estimates, but not as badly as some Western governments had hoped. Russia continues to export oil and gas, despite Europe all but cutting itself off, and that's allowed Moscow to bring in sizable revenues.

The International Monetary Fund predicted Russia's economy will expand just 0.3 percent in 2023, which is an improvement from earlier forecasts of a contraction up to 2.3 percent.

The Russian economy has also held up surprisingly well due to long-standing conservative fiscal policies and revenues from natural-resource sales overseen by President Vladimir Putin that filled public coffers and its rainy-day funds, including ample reserves of both gold and Chinese yuan.

Some experts say Moscow has as least three more years of funding to continue the war at the current pace of operations.

Russia has also managed to circumvent many of the restrictions on dual-use technologies, such as semiconductors, through increased trade with countries like China. China, India, and other countries have also stepped in to replace supply chains for consumer goods like smartphones, appliances, and cars and trucks.

In the interview, Dunnigan also accused Belarus, which has provided logistical support for Russian troops, of being an "accomplice" in the war.

"I do not think that Belarusians want a war against Ukraine to be waged from their country. Therefore, I do not think that he represents the will of his own people," she said. "And I think that's tragic. I think that the consequences for the Belarusian people, who did not want to have anything to do with it, are truly terrible."

She said the United States continued to press Belarus for free and fair elections. Strongman leader Alyaksandr Lukashenka claimed reelection to the presidency in 2020, sparking months of unprecedented streets protests and further isolation from the West.

Dunnigan was scheduled later to travel to Poland to meet with Polish officials about the situation in Belarus.

Ukrainian PM Announces EU-Ukraine Summit In Kyiv On February 3

Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal (file photo)

Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal has announced that a summit with the European Union will take place in Kyiv on February 3, which would send a "powerful signal" to Moscow and the world. Shmyhal told a government meeting that the event would be "extremely important" for Kyiv's bid to join the European bloc. "The fact that this summit will be held in Kyiv is a powerful signal to both partners and enemies." No details were provided on who would be attending on the European Union's side.

U.S. Curbs Exports To Iranian Firms For Producing Drones

An Iranian-made kamikaze drone approaches for an attack in Kyiv on October 17.

The United States has placed new trade restrictions on seven Iranian entities for producing drones used by Russia to attack Ukraine, the U.S. Department of Commerce said. The firms and other organizations were added to an export control list for those engaged in activities contrary to U.S. national security and foreign policy interests. The additions to the so-called entities list were posted in a preliminary filing on January 31. Since Moscow launched its unprovoked war against Ukraine, the United States and other countries have sought to degrade Russia’s military and defense industrial base by using export controls to restrict its access to technology. To read the original story from Reuters, click here.

Russia Not Complying With Inspection Obligation Under Nuclear Arms Treaty, U.S. Says

Then-U.S. President Barack Obama (left) and his Russian counterpart, Dmitry Medvedev, concluded the new START Treaty in 2010.

The United States says Russia is not complying with its obligation under the New START nuclear arms treaty to allow inspection activities on its territory. In a statement on January 31, a State Department spokesperson said Russia's “refusal to facilitate inspection activities prevents the United States from exercising important rights under the treaty and threatens the viability of U.S.-Russian nuclear arms control." Talks between Moscow and Washington on resuming inspections under the New START nuclear arms reduction treaty were to take place in November, but Russia postponed them and neither side has set a new date for a meeting. To read the original story from Reuters, click here.

Iranians Use Sadeh Festival To Protest Against Lack Of Freedoms

Sadeh festivities in the Iranian city of Kerman on January 30.

Iranian protesters have staged fresh anti-government demonstrations by taking to the streets during the Sadeh festival, a traditional ancient celebration in which fire is used to defeat the forces of darkness and cold.

Protesters in Tehran's Ekbatan neighborhood celebrated the Sadeh festival by lighting huge fires, saying they showed the depth of their anger toward the government's intrusion on their freedoms and chanted “death to the dictator,” a reference to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Similar scenes were repeated in the Iranian cities of Yazd, Kerman, Shiraz, Kermanshah, Kerman, and Mashhad.

Sadeh in Persian means "hundred" and refers to the 100 days and nights remaining until the beginning of spring.

The festival, which took on an extra meaning this year after several months of unrest that threatens to tear the country apart as protesters fight for women's and human rights.

The unrest was sparked by the death of Mahsa Amini on September 16. The 22-year-old died while in custody after being arrested by the notorious "morality police" for "improperly" wearing a mandatory Islamic head scarf, or hijab.

Her death, which officials blamed on a heart attack, touched off a wave of anti-government protests in cities across the country. The authorities have met the unrest with a harsh crackdown that rights groups say has killed more than 500 people, including 71 children.

Officials, who have blamed the West for the demonstrations, have vowed to crack down even harder on protesters, with the judiciary leading the way after the unrest entered a fourth month.

The protests pose the biggest threat to the Islamic government since the 1979 revolution.

Several thousand people have been arrested, including many protesters, as well as journalists, lawyers, activists, digital rights defenders, and others.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

Azerbaijan Asks International Court Of Justice To Order Armenia To Help Demining Effort

A view of the International Court of Justice in The Hague (file photo)

Azerbaijan has asked judges at the International Court Of Justice (ICJ) to order Armenia to help demine areas it previously controlled and stop planting explosive devices which prevent Azerbaijani nationals from returning to their former homes. Azerbaijan asked the court, as part of an ongoing larger case, to issue an emergency ruling ordering Armenia to give the locations of the devices to allow for safe demining and stop putting in new mines. Armenia's representative at the ICJ denied that his country had laid landmines outside its sovereign territories, "let alone in civilian areas." To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

Updated

IOC Says Sporting Sanctions On Russia 'Not Negotiable'

The IOC was responding to remarks made by the head of Russia's Olympic Committee, Stanislav Pozdnyakov (pictured)​​​​​, who had said that athletes representing Russia must not be subjected to different conditions than those of other countries. (file photo)

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) insisted on January 31 that the sporting sanctions on Russia and Belarus, imposed over the invasion of Ukraine, are not negotiable. These include bans on Russian and Belarusian athletes competing under their countries' flag. The head of Russia's Olympic Committee, Stanislav Pozdnyakov​, had said earlier that athletes representing Russia must not be subjected to different conditions than those of other countries, amid a growing row over their possible participation in the Paris 2024 Olympics. "The sanctions against the Russian and Belarusian state and governments are not negotiable," an IOC spokesperson said. "They have been unanimously confirmed by the recent Olympic summit meeting on December 9."

Prosecutor Seeks Nine Years For Putin Critic In Trial Held In Absentia

Russian journalist Aleksandr Nevzorov (file photo)

The prosecutor at a high-profile trial in absentia of one of Russia's best-known TV journalists, Aleksandr Nevzorov, has asked a court in Moscow to sentence the outspoken Kremlin critic to nine years in prison on a charge of discrediting the armed forces involved in the ongoing unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.

The prosecutor also asked the Basmanny district court on January 31 to bar Nevzorov from posting anything on the Internet for four years.

The Investigative Committee launched a probe into Nevzorov in March last year over statements he made on Instagram and YouTube that criticized the armed forces for a deadly assault on a nursing home in the Ukrainian city of Mariupol and the alleged torturing and killing of civilians in the town of Bucha.

In May, a court in Moscow ordered that Nevzorov be detained for two months should he return to Russia.

Nevzorov's property in the northwestern Leningrad region was impounded in what the Basmanny district court said was a move to secure compensation for any possible fines Nevzorov will be ordered to pay if convicted.

Nevzorov is currently on a tour across Canada with lectures about Russia's full-scale aggression against Ukraine. He permanently resides in one of the European Union member-states.

In June last year, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy signed a decree granting Ukrainian citizenship to Nevzorov and his wife Lidia "for transcendent services" to Ukraine.

In the days after launching his invasion of Ukraine on February 24, President Vladimir Putin signed into law legislation that calls for lengthy prison terms for distributing "deliberately false information" about Russian military operations as the Kremlin seeks to control the narrative about its war in Ukraine.

The law envisages sentences of up to 10 years in prison for individuals convicted of an offense, while the penalty for the distribution of "deliberately false information" about the Russian military that leads to "serious consequences" is 15 years in prison.

It also makes it illegal "to make calls against the use of Russian troops to protect the interests of Russia" or "for discrediting such use" with a possible penalty of up to three years in prison. The same provision applies to calls for sanctions against Russia.

Nevzorov, who continues to sharply criticize Putin and his government over the Moscow-launched war in Ukraine on his YouTube channel, has rejected the charges saying he has a right to express his own opinion.

Russia issues Decree To Check Cars For Weapons In Regions With 'Terrorist Risk'

(file photo)

Russia will begin checks for weapons and explosives in cars in regions considered to have a high terrorist threat level, according to a presidential decree published on January 31. The decree says "inspections of vehicles using technical means for detecting weapons and explosives" will begin in regions where "a level of terrorist threat has been confirmed." Since the beginning of the conflict in Ukraine, Russia has been at a "yellow" level terrorist threat, which corresponds to confirmed information about a planned terrorist act, in a number of regions that border or are near Ukraine. To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

Court Rejects Belarusian Oppositionists Appeal Against Their Imprisonment

Belarusian oppositionists Aksana Alyakseyeva (left), Mikalay Kazlou (center), and Antanina Kavalyova (composite file photo)

MINSK -- The Minsk City Court has rejected appeals filed by the leader of the Belarusian opposition United Civic Party (AHP) Mikalay Kazlou and his two associates against their imprisonment for participating in a march protesting the official results of a disputed August 2020 presidential election.

The court ruled on January 31 that the sentences of Kazlou, the leader of the AHP's branch in Minsk, Aksana Alyakseyeva, and human rights defender Antanina Kavalyova remain unchanged as they were properly adjudicated by the Pershamayski district court of Minsk in November.

Kazlou was handed 30 months in prison, Alyakseyeva, received 18 months in prison, and Kavalyova was sentenced to one year in prison after Judge Anastasia Kulik found them guilty of taking part in actions that disrupted civil order.

The trio was arrested in late July. Kazlou pleaded not guilty, Kavalyova pleaded partially guilty, and Alyakseyeva pleaded guilty.

On October 31, another court in Minsk sentenced three other AHP members -- Andrus Asmalouski, Dziyana Charnushina, and Artur Smalyakou -- to prison terms of between two and three years on the same charges.

The crimes in both cases stem from a rally on August 23, 2020, that was attended by at least 100,000 people who challenged the results of the presidential poll and a brutal police crackdown that started shortly after Lukashenka was declared the winner. The opposition says the election was rigged.

Security forces used deadly force as they violently detained tens of thousands of people.

Many of Belarus's opposition leaders have been jailed or forced into exile since the August 2020 presidential election. Several protesters have been killed and there have also been credible reports of torture during a widening security crackdown.

Belarusian authorities have also clamped down on civil society, shutting down several nongovernmental organizations and independent media outlets.

The United States, the European Union, and several other countries have refused to acknowledge Lukashenka as the winner of the vote and imposed several rounds of sanctions on him and his regime, citing election fraud and the police crackdown ordered by officials.

AHP is one of the oldest opposition political parties in Belarus and has been in operation since 1995.

Iranian Restaurant Shut Down After Woman Sings At Opening

An official seals the door of a restaurant in the southern city of Mahshahr after a woman sang at its opening.

Iranian authorities have shut down a restaurant in the city of Mahshahr after a female singer performed there, signaling a crackdown on events the authorities deem contrary to Islamic values continues.

The latest incident was sparked by a video published on social media showing a female singer performing at the opening ceremony of a new restaurant in Mahshahr, in the southwestern province of Khuzestan.

After the video went viral and was praised by Iranian social-media users, Farshad Kazemi, the police chief in Mahshahr, announced the restaurant had been sealed shut because of the performance.

Kazemi also added that a legal case had been filed against the owner.

Female singers are not allowed to perform in Iran, and musical concerts face many obstacles since the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

In recent weeks, numerous reports have been published about the sealing of businesses, restaurants, cafes, and in some cases even pharmacies, for not observing Islamic laws and mandatory hijab rules.

The wave of business closings comes amid the monthslong public anger that erupted after 22-year-old Mahsa Amini died in September while in custody after being detained by morality police in Tehran for "improperly" wearing a head scarf.

Since Amini's death, Iranians have flooded into the streets across the country to protest against a lack of rights, with women and schoolgirls making unprecedented shows of support in the biggest threat to the Islamic government since the 1979 revolution.

In response, the authorities have launched a brutal crackdown on dissent, detaining thousands and handing down stiff sentences, including the death penalty, to protesters.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL's Radio Farda

Georgia's Saakashvili Being Transferred To Intensive Care In Hospital, Associates Say

Mikheil Saakashvili appears at his trial via video link in December 2022.

TBILISI -- Jailed former Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, who is being treated in a private clinic in Tbilisi for health problems, is being transferred to an intensive-care unit, his associates say, a claim the hospital's personnel are denying.

Saakashvili's lawyer, Shalva Khachapuridze, along with opposition politician Giorgi Chaladze, said on January 31 that Saakashvili's state of health had worsened further, prompting his move to an intensive-care unit of the Vivamedi hospital.

However, hospital director Nino Nadiradze told RFE/RL's Georgian Service that the former leader remained in his hospital room and had not been moved.

Saakashvili's mother, Giuli Alasania, said earlier in the day that her son, who was diagnosed with COVID-19 several days ago, "again fell unconscious" overnight and that his body temperature had risen to 39 degrees Celsius.

Medical personnel have yet to confirm her statement.

On January 28, Vivamedi's chief physician, Zurab Chkhaidze, told journalists that Saakashvili had dramatically reduced his food consumption and was rejecting medical treatment.

Chkhaidze then called on Saakashvili's relatives to convince him to obey the doctors' recommendations.

The imprisoned ex-president has been treated at the Vivamedi facility since May 2022. Doctors said earlier this month that Saakashvili contracted a mild form of COVID and therefore did not need treatment in intensive care.

Saakashvili, who was president from 2004 to 2013, is serving a six-year sentence for abuse of power, a charge that he and his supporters say was politically motivated.

His medical team says his health has worsened significantly since he went to prison in October 2021 and staged repeated hunger strikes to protest his incarceration.

His lawyers have sought to have his sentence suspended so he can be transferred abroad for more intensive care.

In early December, Saakashvili's legal team distributed a medical report that said he had been "poisoned" with heavy metals while in custody and risked dying without proper treatment.

But Georgian officials have raised doubts about how critical his health situation is.

Saakashvili is currently on trial on separate charges of violently dispersing an anti-government rally in November 2007 and illegal border crossing. He has rejected those charges as well, calling them trumped-up.

Britain Says It's Not Practical To Send Ukraine Fighter Jets

Ukrainian pilots walk by Su-27 fighter jets at an base in Ukraine. (file photo)

Britain does not believe it is practical to send its fighter jets to Ukraine, a spokesperson for Prime Minister Rishi Sunak said on January 31, after Kyiv indicated it would push for such Western planes. "The U.K.'s...fighter jets are extremely sophisticated and take months to learn how to fly. Given that, we believe it is not practical to send those jets into Ukraine," the spokesperson told reporters. "We will continue to discuss with our allies about what we think what is the right approach." To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

Lithuanian President Urges West To 'Cross Red Lines,' Consider Sending Fighter Jets To Ukraine

Lithuanian President Gitanas Nauseda (file photo)

Lithuanian President Gitanas Nauseda has urged the West to keep all options open to requests from Ukraine for weaponry, including fighter jets. Nauseda said in an interview with Lithuanian television on January 31 that fighter aircraft and long-range missiles were "essential military aid" and "at this crucial stage in the war, where the turning point is about to happen." "These red lines must be crossed," he added. The United States and Germany have so far ruled out such demands from Kyiv, though France says it is not against it in principle.

Russian Businessman Klyushin Goes On Trial In U.S. On Insider-Trading Charges

Vladislav Klyushin (undated photo)

Kremlin-linked Russian businessman Vladislav Klyushin, who was extradited from Switzerland to the United States in December 2021, has gone on trial in Boston on charges of involvement in a global scheme to trade shares based on confidential information from hackers.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Frank said as the trial started on January 30 that the 42-year-old businessman, along with his associates, had made about $90 million trading stocks based on information stolen by hackers concerning hundreds of publicly traded companies.

Klyushin was charged with conspiring to obtain unauthorized access to computers and to commit wire fraud and securities fraud.

He pleaded not guilty to all charges.

"The defendant had tomorrow's news, tomorrow's headlines, today," Frank said in his opening statement. "And he exploited it for tens of millions of dollars in profits."

Klyushin's lawyer, Maksim Nemtsev, rejected Frank's opening statement, saying there was "zero evidence" to back up the accusations.

Klyushin owns M-13, a Russian company that offers media monitoring and cybersecurity services. According to Russian opposition media, he is close to Russian President Vladimir Putin's first deputy chief of staff, Aleksei Gromov.

The judge in the case, however, has barred any references to Putin during the trial.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said two of Klyushin's co-defendants -- Ivan Yermakov and Nikolai Rumyantsev -- had been charged with "conspiring to obtain unauthorized access to computers, and to commit wire fraud and securities fraud and with obtaining unauthorized access to computers, wire fraud and securities fraud."

In 2018, U.S. courts charged Yermakov, a former officer in Russia's GRU military intelligence, for his alleged role in hacking and disinformation operations related to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, and for similar activity targeting international anti-doping agencies, sporting federations, and anti-doping officials, it said.

The two other suspects, Mikhail Irzak and Igor Sladkov, have been charged with "conspiracy to obtain unauthorized access to computers, and to commit wire fraud and securities fraud, and with securities fraud."

Only Klyushin has been taken into custody in the case. The other four suspects remain at large.

With reporting by Boston Globe and Reuters

Russian Gets 12 Years For Throwing Molotov Cocktails At Conscription Center

A Russian conscript leaves a military conscription office in Novosibirsk in April 2022.

A court in the Russian Urals city of Yekaterinburg has sentenced a man to 12 years in prison for throwing Molotov cocktails at a military conscription center in the Siberian autonomous district of Khanty-Mansi. The Central Military District Court identified the man as Vladislav Borisenko. It is the first time an arson attack against a military conscription center was classified as a terrorist act. There have been dozens of such attacks since Russia launched its ongoing invasion of Ukraine in February 2022. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Russian Service, click here.

NATO, Japan Pledge To Strengthen Ties In Face Of 'Historic' Security Threat

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg (left) and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida shake hands after holding a joint media briefing on January 31 in Tokyo.

NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida have pledged to strengthen ties, saying Russia's invasion of Ukraine and its growing military cooperation with China had created the most tense security environment since World War II. The comments came in a statement issued during Stoltenberg's trip to Japan following a visit to South Korea on which he urged Seoul to increase military support to Ukraine and gave similar warnings. "The world is at a historical inflection point in the most severe and complex security environment since the end of World War II," the two leaders said in the statement. To read the original story by Reuters, click here.

Uzbek Journalists, Other Karakalpak Activists Given Prison Sentences For Protests

Dauletmurat Tajimuratov is a lawyer for the El Khyzmetinde (At People's Service) newspaper, where he was previously the chief editor. (file photo)

BUKHARA, Uzbekistan -- A court in the southwestern Uzbek city of Bukhara has handed sentences to 22 people -- including lawyer and journalist Dauletmurat Tajimuratov -- accused of undermining the constitutional order for taking part in unprecedented anti-government protests in the autonomous Karakalpakstan region last year.

The Bukhara regional court on January 31 sentenced Tajimuratov to 16 years in prison after finding him guilty of allegedly plotting to seize power by disrupting the constitutional order, organizing mass unrest, embezzlement, and money laundering.

Tajimuratov is a lawyer for the El Khyzmetinde (At People's Service) newspaper, where he was previously the chief editor.

Four defendants, including another journalist, Lolagul Qallykhanova, were handed parole-like sentences and immediately released from custody.

Other defendants were sentenced to prison terms of between three and 8 1/2 years. It remains unclear how the defendants pleaded.

Uzbek authorities say 21 people died in Karakalpakstan during the protests, which were sparked by the announcement in early July last year of a planned change to the constitution that would have undermined the autonomous republic's right to self-determination.

The violence in Nukus, the main city in Karakalpakstan, forced President Shavkat Mirziyoev to make a rare about-face and scrap the proposal.

Mirziyoev accused "foreign forces" of being behind the unrest, without further explanation, before backing down from the proposed changes.

The trial started in late November in Bukhara, around 600 kilometers from both Nukus and the capital, Tashkent.

Mirziyoev came to power in 2016 after the death of his autocratic predecessor, Islam Karimov.

Karakalpaks are a Central Asian Turkic-speaking people. Their region used to be an autonomous area within Kazakhstan before becoming autonomous within the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic in 1930 and then part of Uzbekistan in 1936.

Karakalpakstan is home to fewer than 2 million people in a country of 35 million, but it covers more than one-third of Uzbekistan's territory.

The European Union has called for an independent investigation into the violence.

Russia Fines Amazon's Twitch $57,000 Over Ukraine Content

Twitch, which is owned by Amazon, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

A Russian court on January 31 fined the Twitch streaming service 4 million rubles ($57,000) for failing to remove what it said were "fakes" about Russia's military campaign in Ukraine, the Interfax news agency reported. Twitch, which is owned by Amazon, did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Moscow has long objected to foreign tech platforms' distribution of content that falls foul of its restrictions, with Russian courts regularly imposing penalties. To see the original story by Reuters, click here.

Ukraine Criticizes Croatian President For Comments On Crimea

Croatian President Zoran Milanovic (file photo)

Ukraine's Foreign Ministry has called a statement by Croatian President Zoran Milanovic that Crimea will never return to Ukrainian control "unacceptable." Ukrainian Foreign Ministry spokesman Oleh Nikolenko wrote on Facebook on January 31 that "we consider the statements of the president of Croatia, who actually questioned the territorial integrity of Ukraine, as unacceptable." The post was in response to a comment by Milanovic a day earlier that it was "clear" Crimea, which Russia illegally annexed in 2014, will "never again be part of Ukraine."

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