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Serbian Parliament To Debate ICJ Decision On Kosovo

The Serbian parliament in Belgrade
The Serbian parliament in Belgrade
Serbia's parliament will meet next week to debate the International Court of Justice's (ICJ) July 22 ruling that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 was not in violation of international law.

The extraordinary session of the 250-seat body is scheduled for July 26.

The ICJ's nonbinding decision was hailed in Pristina, while politicians in Belgrade vowed to never recognize Kosovo's independence.

Serbia has said it will pursue its fight to reopen negotiations on the status of Kosovo at the forthcoming UN General Assembly.

compiled from agency reports

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Brother, Associate Of Fugitive Ex-Customs Deputy Chief Give Up Seats In Kyrgyz Parliament

Iskender Matraimov (left to right), Raimbek Matraimov, Nurlan Rajabaliev (combo photo)
Iskender Matraimov (left to right), Raimbek Matraimov, Nurlan Rajabaliev (combo photo)

The Kyrgyz Central Election Commission on February 22 annulled the mandates of lawmakers Iskender Matraimov and Nurlan Rajabaliev at their own requests. The former is a brother and the latter a close associate of the former deputy chief of the Customs Service, Raimbek Matraimov, who was added to the wanted list last month on charges of abduction and the illegal incarceration of unspecified individuals. Raimbek Matraimov, who escaped imprisonment in 2021 by paying 2 billion soms ($22.4 million) to Kyrgyzstan's State Treasury, was hit with the new charges after Kyrgyz police shot dead criminal kingpin Kamchybek Kolbaev in October.
To read the original story by RFE/RL's Kyrgyz Service, click here.

Jailed Kremlin Critic Kara-Murza's Suit Over Poisoning Investigation Rejected

Vladimir Kara-Murza (file photo)
Vladimir Kara-Murza (file photo)

A court in Moscow on February 22 rejected a lawsuit filed by imprisoned Kremlin critic Vladimir Kara-Murza that accused the Investigative Committee of inaction in investigating his suspected poisonings.

Kara-Murza fell deathly ill on two separate occasions in Moscow -- in 2015 and 2017 -- with symptoms consistent with poisoning.

Tissue samples smuggled from Russia to the United States by his relatives were turned over to the FBI, which investigated his case as one of "intentional poisoning."

U.S. government laboratories also conducted extensive tests on the samples, but documents released by the Justice Department suggest they were unable to reach a conclusive finding.

The Kremlin has denied any involvement in the incidents.

At the hearing on February 22, Kara-Murza pointed out that investigative reporters of Bellingcat, The Insider, and Der Spiegel had identified four Federal Security Service (FSB) agents -- Roman Mezentsev, Aleksandr Samofal, Konstantin Kudryavtsev, and Valery Sukharev -- who followed him secretly during both times when he fell ill.

Kara-Murza also said that the investigative report had concluded that some of the identified FSB officers also followed two opposition politicians -- Boris Nemtsov, before he was shot dead near the Kremlin in 2015, and Aleksei Navalny who was poisoned with a Novichok-type nerve agent in 2020.

Kara-Murza added that Navalny's assassination was accomplished last week. Navalny died in a remote prison in Russia's Arctic on February 16.

Wife Of Jailed Russian Politician Kara-Murza Says She Fears For His Life
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Kara-Murza, 42, who holds Russian and British passports, was initially arrested in April 2022 after returning to Russia from abroad and charged with disobeying a police officer.

He was later charged with discrediting the Russian military, a charge stemming from Russia's 2022 invasion of Ukraine and a Kremlin push to stamp out criticism of the subject. He was later additionally charged with treason over remarks he made in speeches outside Russia that criticized Kremlin policies.

In April 2023, Kara-Murza was found guilty of all charges and sentenced to 25 years in prison. He and his supporters reject the charges as politically motivated.

With reporting by Sota

Kyrgyz Lawmakers Approve Second Reading Of Controversial Bill On 'Foreign Representatives'

Kyrgyz parliament (file photo)
Kyrgyz parliament (file photo)

The Kyrgyz parliament on February 22 approved on second reading a controversial bill that would allow authorities to register organizations as "foreign representatives" in a way that critics say mirrors repressive Russian legislation on so-called foreign agents. Dozens of nongovernmental organizations in Kyrgyzstan have called on lawmakers to reject the bill, insisting it merely substitutes the term "foreign representative" for "foreign agent" and would have a similarly chilling effect on their work. Russian authorities have used the law on foreign agents to discredit those labeled as such and to stifle dissent. To see the original story by RFE/RL's Kyrgyz Service, click here.

Russia Adds Kyiv-Based Veteran Journalist Kiselyov To Terrorists Registry

Yevgeny Kiselyov is a former managing director of Russia's once-independent NTV television channel. He has openly condemned the war in Ukraine.
Yevgeny Kiselyov is a former managing director of Russia's once-independent NTV television channel. He has openly condemned the war in Ukraine.

Russian authorities have added a former prominent Russian journalist who currently works for the Kyiv-based Ukrayina 24 TV channel to their list of terrorists and extremists. Yevgeny Kiselyov's name appeared on the list of the Federal Financial Monitoring Service (Rosfinmonitoring) on February 22. Kiselyov is a former managing director of Russia's once-independent NTV television channel. Last year, Russian authorities added Kiselyov to their list of "foreign agents" and wanted list on unspecified charges. Kiselyov has openly condemned Russia's aggression against Ukraine. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Crimea.Realities, click here.

Kazakh Journalist Mukhammedkarim Starts Hunger Strike Demanding His Trial Be Public

The building of the Konaev court where the trial of journalist Duman Muhammedkarim is taking place on February 22.
The building of the Konaev court where the trial of journalist Duman Muhammedkarim is taking place on February 22.

QONAEV, Kazakhstan -- Independent Kazakh journalist Duman Mukhammedkarim, who is on trial for what he says are politically motivated charges of financing an extremist group and participating in a banned group's activities, has launched a hunger strike to demand that his court hearings be open to the public.

Mukhammedkarim's lawyer, Ghalym Nurpeisov, told reporters and his client's supporters on February 22 after the journalist's trial resumed in the southern town of Qonaev that Mukhammedkarim vowed to stop his hunger strike only after the judge retracts his previous decision to hold the trial behind closed doors.

The high-profile trial of the reporter known for his articles critical of the government started on February 12.

Dozens of Mukhammedkarim's supporters again gathered in front of the court's building, chanting "Freedom!"

Mukhammedkarim, whose Ne Deidi? (What Do They Say?) YouTube channel is extremely popular in Kazakhstan, was sent to pretrial detention in June 2023 over his online interview with fugitive banker and outspoken critic of the Kazakh government Mukhtar Ablyazov. Ablyazov's Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan (DVK) movement was labeled as extremist and banned in the country in March 2018.

If convicted, Mukhammedkarim could be sentenced to up to 12 years in prison.

Domestic and international right organizations have urged Kazakh authorities to drop all charges against Mukhammedkarim and immediately release him. Kazakh rights defenders recognize Mukhammedkarim as a political prisoner.

Rights watchdogs have criticized the authorities in the tightly controlled former Soviet republic for persecuting dissent, but Astana has shrugged off the criticism, saying there are no political prisoners in the country.

Kazakhstan was ruled by authoritarian President Nursultan Nazarbaev from its independence from the Soviet Union in 1991 until current President Qasym-Zhomart Toqaev succeeded him in 2019.

Over the past three decades, several opposition figures have been killed and many jailed or forced to flee the country.

Toqaev, who broadened his powers after Nazarbaev and his family left the oil-rich country's political scene following the deadly, unprecedented anti-government protests in January 2022, has promised political reforms and more freedoms for citizens.

However, many in Kazakhstan consider the reforms announced by Toqaev cosmetic, as a crackdown on dissent has continued even after the president announced his "New Kazakhstan" program.

Updated

Ukraine Says Strike On Russian Troops In Kherson Kills Scores, Denies Losing Bridgehead On Dnieper Left Bank

Destroyed Russian tanks are seen near the village of Bohorodychne in the Donetsk region on February 13.
Destroyed Russian tanks are seen near the village of Bohorodychne in the Donetsk region on February 13.

Ukraine's military has acknowledged it struck a training ground in occupied Kherson where Russian troops were preparing for an assault on Ukraine's bridgehead at Krynka on the left bank of the Dnieper River, the second time this week a strike has killed scores of Russian personnel.

At the same time, Kyiv denied Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu's claim that Russian forces had captured the Ukrainian bridgehead at Krynka.

Live Briefing: Russia's Invasion Of Ukraine

RFE/RL's Live Briefing gives you all of the latest developments on Russia's full-scale invasion, Kyiv's counteroffensive, Western military aid, global reaction, and the plight of civilians. For all of RFE/RL's coverage of the war in Ukraine, click here.

"There were at least three strikes on the concentration of Russian troops at the training ground near Novaya Kakhovka," Nataliya Humenyuk, spokeswoman of the Defense Forces of Southern Ukraine, told RFE/RL on February 22.

"The Russian military was preparing to storm Krynka, which they claimed they had already been captured.... According to preliminary data, commanders of the Dnieper group [of Russian forces] were also there. The information is still being checked," Humenyuk said.

In a separate statement made to Suspilne, Humenyuk said at least 60 Russian soldiers were killed in the attack.

Russia has not commented on the strike, which was first reported by both the Ukrainian Telegram channel DeepState and Russian pro-war bloggers that it resulted in heavy losses. A video of the purported attack consisting of three strikes was also published on Telegram channels.

However, the information could not be independently verified.

At a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin on February 20, Shoigu said Krynka "has been cleared," but Ukraine's military said his statement was "a falsification of the facts."

Ukrainian forces in November 2022 liberated Kherson city and the rest of the region on the right bank of the Dnieper forcing Russian troops across the river. Last year, Kyiv's troops managed to also establish a small bridgehead on the Dnieper's left bank, which has come under constant Russian attacks.

The purported Ukrainian strike on Russian forces in Kherson was the second in as many days in which a large number of Russian troops were reportedly killed.

On February 21, BBC Russian reported that a Ukrainian strike on a training ground in Moscow-occupied Donetsk had killed at least 60 Russian troops.

According to the report, Russian soldiers from the 36th Guards Motorized Rifle Brigade had been lined up and were waiting for the arrival of Major General Oleg Moiseyev, commander of the 29th Russian Army, when the strike occurred on February 20.

Neither Russia nor Ukraine has commented on the report. Pro-Russian social media outlets posted videos and photos purportedly showing dozens of uniformed dead bodies, accusing Moiseyev of making soldiers stand in line waiting for his arrival when they were hit.

Ukrainian Air Force spokesman Yuriy Ihnat said on February 22 that since launching the invasion two year ago, Russia has launched more than 8,000 missiles and 4,630 drones -- of which 3,605 have been shot down -- at targets inside Ukraine.

In Moscow, former President Dmitry Medvedev boasted that after Ukrainian forces last week withdrew from the eastern city of Avdiyivka following a monthslong bloody battle, Russian troops would keep advancing deeper into Ukraine.

With the war nearing its two-year mark amid Ukrainian shortages of manpower, more advanced weapons, and ammunition, Medvedev signaled Moscow could again try and seize the capital after being pushed back decisively from the outskirts of Kyiv during the initial days of the invasion in February 2022.

"Where should we stop? I don't know," Medvedev, now deputy chairman of Russia's Security Council, said in an interview with Russian media.

"Will it be Kyiv? Yes, it probably should be Kyiv. If not now, then after some time, maybe in some other phase of the development of this conflict," he said.

Medvedev was once considered a reformer in Russia, serving as president to allow Vladimir Putin to be prime minister for four years to abide by term limits before returning to the presidency for a third time in 2012.

But the 56-year-old former lawyer has become known more recently for his caustic articles, social media posts, and remarks that echo the outlandish kind of historical revisionism that Putin has used to vilify the West and underpin the unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.

Taliban Publicly Executes Two People For Murder

A Taliban fighter and onlookers witness the execution of three men in Ghazni Province in 2015.
A Taliban fighter and onlookers witness the execution of three men in Ghazni Province in 2015.

Taliban officials say two people were publicly executed on February 22 for murder at a soccer stadium in the southeastern Afghan city of Ghazni. The Taliban’s Supreme Court said in a statement that the execution of the two, whose names were withheld, was ordered by three courts and the Taliban's supreme leader, Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada. Witnesses were ordered not to record the executions. The first confirmed public execution after the Taliban's return to power in August 2021 was carried out in December 2022 in Farah Province. In June 2023, the Taliban publicly executed a person for murdering five people in Laghman Province. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Radio Azadi, click here.

Russian-Installed Police In Crimea Detain Crimean Tatar Rights Activist Zudiyeva

Crimean Tatar human rights activist Lutfiye Zudiyeva (file photo)
Crimean Tatar human rights activist Lutfiye Zudiyeva (file photo)

Russian-imposed police in Ukraine's Moscow-annexed Crimea detained a Crimean Tatar human rights activist, Lutfiye Zudiyeva, after searching her home on February 22, said the Crimean Solidarity human rights groups, of which Zudiyeva is a member. The reasons for the search and detention remain unclear. The officers confiscated her laptop, mobile phones, and memory drives, Zudiyeva's husband told Crimean Solidarity. Since illegally annexing Crimea in 2014, Russia has imposed pressure on Crimean Tatars, the peninsula's indigenous ethnic group, many of whom openly protested the annexation. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Crimea.Realities, click here.

Russian Court Recognizes Movement Supporting Imprisoned Former Governor As Extremist

Protesters demand the release of the arrested governor of the Khabarovsk region, Sergei Furgal, in Khabarovsk, in August 2020.
Protesters demand the release of the arrested governor of the Khabarovsk region, Sergei Furgal, in Khabarovsk, in August 2020.

A court in Russia's Far Eastern Region of Khabarovsk Krai on February 22 recognized a movement supporting the region's imprisoned former Governor Sergei Furgal as extremist. The court concluded that the We Are Furgal movement "is united by an extremist ideology" expressed by "inciting hatred toward authorities and the destruction of societal values." Furgal was sentenced to 22 years in prison in February 2023 after a jury convicted him of attempted murder and ordering two killings in 2004 and 2005, charges he has steadfastly denied. Furgal's arrest in 2020 sparked months-long mass protests in the Khabarovsk region. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Russian Service, click here.

With Sights On Taliban, UN Experts Call For Declaring Gender Apartheid A Crime Against Humanity

Afghan women wait to receive food from foreign aid in Kandahar. Since seizing power in August 2021, the Taliban has reinstated one of the most rigid gender discrimination policies in the world.
Afghan women wait to receive food from foreign aid in Kandahar. Since seizing power in August 2021, the Taliban has reinstated one of the most rigid gender discrimination policies in the world.

United Nations experts on discrimination against women and girls have called on the international community to formally recognize "gender apartheid" as a crime against humanity.

Emphasizing the grave situation of women and girls under the Taliban rule in Afghanistan, the five-member panel of experts from Mexico, the United States, China, Serbia, and Uganda said the step is long overdue.

"The Taliban's rule makes codifying gender apartheid in international law particularly urgent," a UN press statement said.

"It would allow the international community to better identify and address the regime’s attacks on Afghan women and girls," the statement added.

Since seizing power in August 2021 as international troops left the country, the Taliban has reinstated one of the most rigid gender discrimination policies in the world.

Its government has banned women and teenage girls from education and employment in most sectors. The Taliban's growing restrictions against women are aimed at controlling their appearance and their public interactions.

Afghan women are also banned from leisure activities and visiting bathhouses. Women are barred from or discouraged from running or visiting beauty salons and restaurants.

“State laws, policies, and practices that relegate women to conditions of extreme inequality and oppression, with the intent of effectively extinguishing their human rights, reflect the very core of apartheid systems,” the UN statement said.

The UN experts recommended including gender apartheid as a crime against humanity under Article 2 of the draft articles on the prevention and punishment of crimes against humanity. The UN General Assembly’s Sixth Committee is currently considering the draft legislation.

"Women are detained and tortured under various pretexts," a woman resident of the capital, Kabul, told RFE/RL's Radio Azadi. “I hope that gender apartheid will be recognized in Afghanistan."

Another woman in he capital told Radio Azadi that gender discrimination needs to end soon.

"Don't perpetuate this crisis,” she said.

For more than a year, Afghan women's rights activists have been campaigning to declare the Taliban's treatment of Afghan women and girls as gender apartheid.

Updated

Newspaper Honoring Navalny Withdrawn From Moscow Newsstands As Authorities Withhold His Body

Police officers watch a woman laying flowers in tribute to Aleksei Navalny at a monument in St. Petersburg on February 18. Almost 200 people have been arrested in the city in the past week for attending memorials for the opposition activist, who died in prison on February 16.
Police officers watch a woman laying flowers in tribute to Aleksei Navalny at a monument in St. Petersburg on February 18. Almost 200 people have been arrested in the city in the past week for attending memorials for the opposition activist, who died in prison on February 16.

An issue of Russian weekly Sobesednik dedicated partially to the memory of Aleksei Navalny has been withdrawn from newsstands in Moscow, the newspaper's editorial board says, as authorities continue to clamp down on any public manifestation of respect for the late Kremlin opponent.

Navalny's death in a remote Arctic prison camp was reported on February 16, prompting an outpouring of grief and mounting outrage in Russia and around the world as authorities have been refusing to release his body to his mother amid growing suspicions about the cause of his death, which was officially attributed to "sudden death" syndrome.

While most printed media in Russia ignored the death of the opposition politician and activist, Sobesednik's latest hard-copy issue, released on February 21, featured a photograph of a smiling Navalny on the front page accompanied by the caption “...but there is hope!”

It included reports of the spontaneous commemorations of Navalny's death in several Russian cities and commentaries by public figures, human rights activists, and journalists such as 2021 Nobel Peace Prize co-winner Dmitry Muratov.

Sobesednik journalist Elena Milchanovskaya told the SotaVision Telegram channel that the editors were not informed why all copies of the magazine were seized by authorities in Moscow.

"All this is very serious and even a little scary for us,” Milchanovskaya said, adding that Russia's Roskomnadzor media watchdog also blocked online access to the section of the issue dedicated to Navalny.

Navalny's death after his being detained in extremely harsh conditions at the Polar Wolf Arctic prison camp in Russia's far north Yamalo-Nenets region prompted hundreds of Russians to stage spontaneous gatherings in his memory that were immediately repressed by authorities.

According to OVD-Info, between February 16–19 security forces detained 397 people in 39 cities at rallies in memory of Navalny.

Most of the arrests -- almost 200 -- took place in St. Petersburg, where six of those arrested were given summonses to the military registration and enlistment office as they were leaving the temporary detention center on February 21.

Navalny's mother, Lyudmila Navalnaya, filed a lawsuit in a Russian court on February 21 demanding the release of her son's body after her direct video appeal to President Vladimir Putin remained unanswered.

A court in Yamalo-Nenets said on February 21 that a hearing into Navalnaya's complaint will be held on March 4.

Russian Orthodox priests have initiated an online petition calling for authorities to release Navalny's body to his family, stressing that the outspoken Kremlin critic was an Orthodox Christian.

"Remember, we are all equal in front of God.... Be merciful and compassionate to his mother, wife, children, and other loved ones.... Everyone deserves to be buried humanely," the petition says. Some 800 people had already signed the petition as of early on February 22.

Individuals Who Honored Navalny's Memory In St. Petersburg Given Summonses To Enlistment Office

Police officers watch a woman laying flowers to pay tribute to Aleksei Navalny at a monument in St. Petersburg on February 18.
Police officers watch a woman laying flowers to pay tribute to Aleksei Navalny at a monument in St. Petersburg on February 18.

Police officers gave summonses to six men arrested for laying flowers in St. Petersburg in memory of Kremlin opponent Aleksei Navalny, who died last week at an Arctic prison camp, Rotunda website reports. Officers handed the summonses to the military registration and enlistment office as the six were leaving the temporary detention center. Summonses were also handed to four people who had come from outside St. Petersburg to honor Navalny's memory. Nearly 200 people were arrested in St. Petersburg for laying flowers at the Navalny memorial, the vast majority of them for periods of one to 14 days. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Russian Service, click here.

Biden Calls Putin A 'Crazy SOB' And Takes Aim At Trump During Fund-Raiser For 2024 Election

U.S. President Joe Biden was talking about climate change when he said, “We have a crazy SOB like Putin and others, and we always have to worry about nuclear conflict, but the existential threat to humanity is climate.”
U.S. President Joe Biden was talking about climate change when he said, “We have a crazy SOB like Putin and others, and we always have to worry about nuclear conflict, but the existential threat to humanity is climate.”

During a fund-raiser for his reelection campaign on February 21, President Joe Biden called Russian President Vladimir Putin a “crazy SOB” and took aim at former President Donald Trump's comments comparing himself to Aleksei Navalny, the Kremlin opponent who died last week in an Arctic prison. Biden was talking about climate change when he said, “We have a crazy SOB like Putin and others, and we always have to worry about nuclear conflict, but the existential threat to humanity is climate.” Speaking to donors, Biden also said he was astounded by recent comments made by his likely Republican challenger.

Flowers, Candles Placed In Tribute To Navalny In Serbia's Largest Cities

Flowers and candles for Kremlin opponent Aleksei Navalny were placed on the evening of February 21 in front of the Russian Embassy in Belgrade.
Flowers and candles for Kremlin opponent Aleksei Navalny were placed on the evening of February 21 in front of the Russian Embassy in Belgrade.

Flowers and candles for Kremlin opponent Aleksei Navalny were placed on the evening of February 21 in front of the Russian Embassy in Belgrade and in the central square of Serbia's second-largest city, Novi Sad. Navalny's death at an Arctic prison camp was announced on February 16. Photos of the spontaneous memorial, along with pictures and messages about Navalny's death, were published by the Russian Democratic Society, a group of Russian expats who are critical of President Vladimir Putin and oppose his invasion of Ukraine. "Navalny was truly a national hero," the group's founder, Peter Nikitin, told RFE/RL. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Balkan Service, click here.


New EU Ambassador To U.S. Says Unity, Strength Are Most Important To Stop Russia's Aggression

EU Ambassador to the United States Jovita Neliupsiene says she believes there is broad support for the aid bill in Congress but what is lacking is the will to pass it.
EU Ambassador to the United States Jovita Neliupsiene says she believes there is broad support for the aid bill in Congress but what is lacking is the will to pass it.

The new EU ambassador to the United States has arrived in Washington at a time when tough issues related to the war in Ukraine are at the top of the international agenda as the conflict grinds toward its two-year anniversary on February 24.

Chief among them for U.S. politicians is a crucial $61 billion military aid bill proposed by President Joe Biden that has stalled in Congress despite his pleadings with lawmakers to pass it, saying its failure would only play into Russian President Vladimir Putin’s hands.

Live Briefing: Russia's Invasion Of Ukraine

RFE/RL's Live Briefing gives you all of the latest developments on Russia's full-scale invasion, Kyiv's counteroffensive, Western military aid, global reaction, and the plight of civilians. For all of RFE/RL's coverage of the war in Ukraine, click here.

Ambassador Jovita Neliupsiene, speaking in her first interview with a U.S.-based broadcaster since stepping into the role of EU ambassador to the U.S. on January 1, said her message to Congress is that the United States and the European Union must act together to help Ukraine stop Russia’s aggression.

“It's difficult to imagine that Ukraine can fight this war for their freedom, for their security, for their existence, actually, without support being provided by the EU and by the United States,” Neliupsiene told RFE/RL on January 21.

She believes there is broad support for the aid bill in Congress. What is lacking is the will to pass it.

“I’m sure that a majority of the Congress [supports] the package for Ukraine because we are speaking about a war on the European continent, a war that can [cross] borders if the aggressor, the dictator, is not stopped,” the ambassador said.

In speaking with members of Congress and diplomats in Washington, Neliupsiene said she can put her message concisely: “If not us, then who? If not now, then when?”

She also stressed the need to take action is urgent because Putin’s regime will “push the red lines until they know that this is really a red line,” adding that if Russia pushes further in Ukraine, the EU will have to make more costly and painful decisions, “and there will be no escape.”

As Neliupsiene sets out in her new position, the Lithuanian whose past positions include vice minister of foreign affairs noted that the EU has stepped up in the absence of continued U.S. military aid to Ukraine.

EU leaders on February 1 reached a deal to provide 50 billion euros ($54 billion). This follow 94 billion euros last year, and while EU aid is mostly to ensure that Ukraine can sustain state operations, about 30 percent goes toward defense, she said.

The EU and United States also must work together on sanctions, the new EU ambassador said, noting a priority of the EU’s sanctions packages, including the 13th package set forth on February 21, has been to slow down Russia’s military industrial capacity and prevent Moscow from acquiring high-quality components.

The EU has imposed sanctions on 1,600 individuals and several hundred companies even before the new round of sanctions was announced, and the coalition of countries observing sanctions has grown to more than 50, she said.

Meanwhile, Russia has been joined in a “coalition of ill will” that includes Iran, Belarus, North Korea, and China that must be countered. The key to that is to show unity in the face of Russia’s war, and an important part of her message is that the European countries are united right now.

“We think and we believe that only a united front can actually make sure that Ukraine can prevail,” she said. “But victory has to stand on two legs on both sides of the Atlantic.”

Updated

Supreme Court Rejects Nadezhdin's Latest Appeal Over Decision To Bar Him From Russian Presidential Vote

The Uzbekistan-born 60-year-old academic and former lawmaker had appealed the final decision by the Central Election Commission to bar him from taking part in Russia's upcoming presidential election.
The Uzbekistan-born 60-year-old academic and former lawmaker had appealed the final decision by the Central Election Commission to bar him from taking part in Russia's upcoming presidential election.

Russia’s Supreme Court on February 21 threw out anti-war presidential candidate Boris Nadezhdin’s latest appeal of the Central Election Commission’s (TsIK) decision to bar him from next month’s presidential election.

The Uzbekistan-born 60-year-old academic and former lawmaker had appealed the Central Election Commission’s final decision to bar him from the election.

TsIK, which routinely refuses to register would-be opposition candidates on the pretext that they submitted an insufficient number of valid signatures, disqualified thousands of signatures Nadezhdin's representatives gathered across the country to reach the 100,000-signature threshold needed to be registered as a candidate.

"The Supreme Court of the Russian Federation refused to satisfy my claim to challenge the refusal to register. I will appeal the decision within 5 days. On February 26, the Court will consider appeals on the first two claims," Nadezhdin said in a post on Telegram.

"I will not accept failure."

Last week the same court rejected two other appeals he filed over TsIK decisions related to the collection of signatures on petitions to register his candidacy. The decision on February 21 can be appealed to the Appeal Board of the Supreme Court.

The first appeal was related to the TsIK's explanation of its decision by the fact that many of Nadezhdin's representatives who collected the signatures had power of attorney papers certified by notary offices in regions other than the ones in which they were collecting signatures.

Nadezhdin insists that TsIK abused its powers because no Russian law says signature collectors' powers of attorney must be certified by notary offices in the same regions where the signatures are collected.

In his second appeal, Nadezhdin questioned the TsIK's documents on checking his supporters' signatures, saying the TsIK failed to add written conclusions of handwriting experts to its signatures’ inspection protocols.

Nadezhdin, who was proposed as a presidential candidate by the Civic Platform party, is the only politician with presidential ambitions who has publicly condemned Russia's invasion of Ukraine and criticized incumbent Vladimir Putin. Russia's presidential election is scheduled to be held March 15-17.

Russian elections are tightly controlled by the Kremlin and are neither free nor fair but are viewed by the government as necessary to convey a sense of legitimacy.

They are mangled by the exclusion of opposition candidates, voter intimidation, ballot stuffing, and other means of manipulation.

Meanwhile, the Kremlin's tight grip on politics, media, law enforcement, and other levers means Putin, who has ruled Russia as president or prime minister since 1999, is certain to win, barring a very big, unexpected development.

But the surprising show of support for the little-known Nadezhdin, whose platform says the invasion of Ukraine was a "fatal mistake" and accuses Putin of dragging Russia into the past instead of building a sustainable future, is complicating the Kremlin's more aggressive ambition of boosting the perception of Putin's legitimacy.

Those who were expected to be Putin's main challengers currently are either incarcerated or fled the country, fearing for their safety.

Aleksei Navalny, a leading opposition voice who attempted to run against Putin in 2018, was barred by the TsIK over a conviction in a fraud case in what is widely seen as a politically motivated conviction.

Navalny died in prison on February 16 after he reportedly collapsed while being on a daily walk out of his cell. No official cause of death has been given by authorities, who have refused to turn the body over to family saying they will need two weeks to investigate "chemical forensics."

Soviet-Era Ukrainian Dissident, Politician Stepan Khmara Dies At 86

Stepan Khmara in Kyiv in 2016
Stepan Khmara in Kyiv in 2016

One of the most prominent Soviet-era dissidents of Ukraine, Stepan Khmara has died at age 86, his wife said on February 21 without giving the cause of death. Khmara was involved in human rights activities as a university student. In 1980 he was sentenced to seven years in prison on a charge of anti-Soviet propaganda. After his release in 1987, he co-founded Ukraine's Helsinki Committee and openly supported the idea of Ukraine's independence. Khmara was a lawmaker after Ukraine gained independence in 1991. In 2006 he was awarded the title Hero of Ukraine. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Ukrainian Service, click here.

Russian Court Allows Government To Take Over Assets Of Nation's Biggest Auto Dealer

A Rolf dealership in St. Petersburg (file photo)
A Rolf dealership in St. Petersburg (file photo)

A court in St. Petersburg has allowed the government to take over the assets of the country's largest auto dealership, Rolf, founded by businessman Sergei Petrov. The court ruled on February 21 that the company’s shares owned by Delance and Rolf Motors, as well as all existing shares of Rolf Motors, Rolf Estate St. Petersburg, and Rolf Tech must be transferred to Russian government control. President Vladimir Putin signed a decree on temporarily putting Rolf under state management in December. The self-exiled Petrov called Putin's decree a manifestation of "lawlessness" at the time. To read the original story by Current Time, click here.

Proposed Law In Kazakhstan Would Bar Former President's Relatives From Burial At Pantheon

The idea to construct the Pantheon -- a public building housing the graves of prominent Kazakhs and a cemetery sitting on some 9,000 hectares of land near Astana, the capital -- caused controversy in Kazakh society when it was initiated by Nazarbaev's government in 2016.
The idea to construct the Pantheon -- a public building housing the graves of prominent Kazakhs and a cemetery sitting on some 9,000 hectares of land near Astana, the capital -- caused controversy in Kazakh society when it was initiated by Nazarbaev's government in 2016.

Amid ongoing efforts to further weaken former President Nursultan Nazarbaev and his associates, the Kazakh government has initiated amendments to the law on the Pantheon -- a burial site for the Central Asian nation's prominent figures -- that would remove Nazarbaev's relatives from the list of individuals who deserve to be buried at the pricey public site.

Media reports in Kazakhstan said on February 21 that the bill had been worked out by the Culture and Information Ministry.

The bill says relatives of all presidents, except their spouses, and other top officials, as well as laureates of the state Order of the First President of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Elbasy (National Leader) Nursultan Nazarbaev cannot be buried in the Pantheon.

The bill would reverse current law saying relatives of the first president of Kazakhstan, those of his successors, as well as relatives of the Constitutional Court's chairs and those of state secretaries have a right to be buried at the site.

The idea to construct the Pantheon -- a public building housing the graves of prominent Kazakhs and a cemetery sitting on some 9,000 hectares of land near Astana, the capital -- caused controversy in Kazakh society when it was initiated by Nazarbaev's government in 2016.

Many accused the government of misusing hundreds of millions of dollars of public funds and taxpayers' money amid an economic downfall, while others accused Nazarbaev of attempting to preserve the then-cemented cult of his personality even after his death.

The head of the Astana City Directorate for Land Issues, Toleughazy Nurkenov, said at the time that the move was needed "to implement the orders of the state leader [President Nazarbaev] regarding the construction of the National Pantheon and the necessity to set up a new city cemetery."

Nazarbaev, 83, and his inner circle lost power and influence after unprecedented anti-government protests in January 2022 that turned deadly after police and security forces opened fire on protesters.

Nazarbaev resigned as president in 2019, picking longtime ally Qasym-Zhomart Toqaev as his successor.

But he retained sweeping powers as head of the Security Council, enjoying the powers as "elbasy." Many of his relatives continued to hold important posts in the government, security agencies, and profitable energy groups.

The protests in January started over a fuel-price hike and spread across Kazakhstan amid widespread discontent over the cronyism that has long plagued the country. Toqaev subsequently stripped Nazarbaev of the Security Council role, taking it over himself.

Just days after the protests, several of Nazarbaev's relatives and those close to the family were pushed out of their positions or resigned. Some have been arrested on corruption charges.

Last year, Kazakh authorities annulled the Law on the First President -- the Leader of the Nation (Elbasy), depriving Nazarbaev's immediate family members of legal immunity.

Also in January 2023, parliament canceled Nazarbaev’s status of lifetime honorable member of the parliament’s upper chamber, the Senate.

In the last several months, Nazarbaev’s monument was removed from a site in front of the National Defense Ministry in Astana, his large portrait was removed from the Almaty metro, and his another monument in the atrium of the National Museum was also dismantled.

With reporting by KazTAG and Tengrinews

Zelenskiy Calls On Polish, EU Leaders To Meet At Ukrainian-Polish Border Amid Tension

A banner on a tractor reads "Putin, sort out Ukraine, Brussels, and our government" as part of an ongoing protest by Polish farmers at the Ukraine border on February 20.
A banner on a tractor reads "Putin, sort out Ukraine, Brussels, and our government" as part of an ongoing protest by Polish farmers at the Ukraine border on February 20.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy on February 21 called on Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk, President Andrzej Duda, and members of the European Commission to meet with him and members of his government at the Ukrainian-Polish border by February 24 amid ongoing tension caused by Polish farmers' protests against Ukrainian food imports that they say are impacting the prices of their own output. Zelenskiy stressed that the issue must be addressed as soon as possible, saying it could affect national security.

Dodik Doubles Down On Refusal To Join Sanctions Against Moscow In Meeting With Putin

Republika Srpska President Milorad Dodik meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Kazan, Russia, on February 21.
Republika Srpska President Milorad Dodik meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Kazan, Russia, on February 21.

Milorad Dodik, the pro-Russia president of the Serbian entity of Bosnia-Herzegovina, met with Russian President Vladimir Putin on February 21 and reaffirmed the entity's refusal to join Western sanctions against Moscow over its full-scale invasion of Ukraine.

Dodik, president of Republika Srpska, said he "confirmed the good relations" that Republika Srpska has "with the Russian state and with you" at the meeting in the Russian republic of Tatarstan.

"What we are doing in the current circumstances is that we reject any possibility of joining Western sanctions against Russia," Dodik added, according to Radio-Television of Republika Srpska (RTRS), the Bosnian entity's public broadcaster.

It was Dodik's fourth meeting with Putin since Russia launched its invasion of Ukraine two years ago.

Dodik is under U.S. and U.K. sanctions for his alleged obstruction of the Dayton agreement and violating the legitimacy of Bosnia. He has spent the past two years attempting to erode central Bosnian authority and establishing parallel institutions to further his longtime threats to divide the country for good, receiving harsh rebukes from Western officials.

The Office of the High Representative (OHR) in Bosnia told RFE/RL that Bosnia "has undertaken to follow the security and foreign policy guidelines of the EU" as a candidate country for membership.

"This excludes cooperation with countries that are under sanctions, as well as personal meetings with the heads of those countries," the OHR said.

In addition to its EU candidate status, granted in December 2022, Bosnia as a nation has joined the EU sanctions against Moscow. However, the implementation has faced obstacles due to the obstruction by Republika Srpska officials led by Dodik.

Dodik is among the few Western Balkan officials to engage in talks with Russian and Belarusian counterparts despite Russia's ongoing invasion of Ukraine.

Putin said Dodik's visit would be "useful" and expressed gratitude for regular contacts, Republika Srpska news agency SRNA reported.

"Representatives of the [Republika Srpska] leadership visit us regularly. We cooperate with you in various fields," Putin said, according to SRNA. "I am sure that this visit will also be useful, and that we will use the time to discuss bilateral relations in a whole range of areas."

He added that "Russia knows that the situation is not simple."

Dodik and Putin last met in Moscow in May 2023, when Dodik said Republika Srpska "remains pro-Russian, anti-Western, and anti-American."

European Commissioner for Neighborhood and Enlargement Oliver Varhelyi warned then that EU allies "don't go to Russia."

Dodik arrived in Kazan, the capital of Tatarstan, after a two-day visit to Belarus that included a meeting with Belarusian authoritarian leader Alyaksandr Lukashenka in Minsk on February 19.

Lukashenka and his allies are isolated and under a series of Western sanctions over the brutal crackdown on mass protests that followed Lukashenka's disputed reelection in 2020 and Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

With reporting by Goran Katic

Navalny's Mother Files Lawsuit Over Demanding Release His Body, Court Sets March 4 Hearing Date

Lyudmila Navalnaya, the mother of late Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, delivers a video address to Russian President Vladimir Putin as she stands near the Arctic Polar Wolf prison on February 20.
Lyudmila Navalnaya, the mother of late Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, delivers a video address to Russian President Vladimir Putin as she stands near the Arctic Polar Wolf prison on February 20.

Lyudmila Navalnaya, the mother of late opposition politician Aleksei Navalny, has filed a lawsuit in a Russian court demanding the release of her son's body as outrage mounts over the authorities' handling of Navalny's death in an Arctic prison.

A court in the Arctic region of Yamalo-Nenets said on February 21 that a hearing into complaint will be held on March 4. Navalny died in prison on February 16 but officials have repeatedly refused to return the body to his family claiming that an "investigation" into the cause of death would take up to two weeks.

If the full two weeks are taken to examine Navalny's body, it wouldn't be released until March 4.

Navalnaya has been trying to get access to her son's body since his death in a prison of special regime, the harshest type of penitentiary in Russia, was announced. Prison officials said the 47-year-old died after he collapsed while being on a daily walk out of his cell.

The Salekhard City Court told TASS news agency that the March 4 hearing set for Navalnaya's lawsuit will be held behind closed doors. Navalny, 47, died in the town of Kharp near Salekhard.

On February 20, Navalnaya posted a video on social media taken from outside the so-called Polar Wolf prison's razor-wire topped fence pleading with President Vladimir Putin for his help.

"I'm reaching out to you, Vladimir Putin. The resolution of this matter depends solely on you. Let me finally see my son. I demand that Aleksei's body is released immediately, so that I can bury him like a human being," she said in the video.

A day before that, Navalny's widow, Yulia Navalnaya, accused Putin of killing her husband and accused officials of "cowardly and meanly hiding his body, refusing to give it to his mother and lying miserably.”

The Kremlin has rejected any accusations of a role or subsequent coverup in the death of Putin's most vocal critic.

Penitentiary officials told Navalnaya that her son's body was in a morgue in Salekhard, but the morgue turned out to be closed that evening, while its employees told Navalnaya that they do not have her son's body. A day later Navalnaya again came to the morgue, but was not allowed to enter it.

The Investigative Committee said the investigation of her son's death was extended as investigators were conducting "chemical forensics" on Navalny's body.

'Putin's Nemesis' Is Dead. Will Aleksei Navalny Still Figure In Russia's Future?
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Navalny's self-exiled associate Ivan Zhdanov said on February 19 that Navalny's body may be held by the authorities for a fortnight, adding that the goal of the investigation's extension was "to cover up the crime."

The OVD-Info human rights group, however, said Russian laws may allow the Investigative Committee to hold Navalny's body for up to 30 days.

Since the announcement of his death, Russian police have cordoned off memorial sites where people were laying flowers and candles to honor Navalny, and dispersed and arrested hundreds of suspected violators in dozens of cities.

Six residents of Russia's second largest city, St. Petersburg, who served several days in jail for laying flowers at a makeshift memorial honoring Navalny were handed written summons on February 21 saying they must report to a military recruitment center.

OVD-Info said that as of February 21, 397 people across 39 cities in Russia have been detained for commemorating Navalny since his death.

With reporting by TASS

Kazakh Lawmakers Approve In First Reading Bill On Life Imprisonment For Pedophiles, Child Murderers

The lower chamber of Kazakhstan's parliament, the Mazhilis (file photo)
The lower chamber of Kazakhstan's parliament, the Mazhilis (file photo)

Members of Kazakh parliament's lower chamber, Mazhilis, on February 21, approved the first reading of a bill that would allow life imprisonment for individuals convicted of pedophilia and/or the murder of children. The bill comes after President Qasym-Zhomart Toqaev ordered in his address to the nation in September 2023 that such legislation was needed, the parliament's press service said. The bill also toughens the punishment for assaulting and beating children and "helpless" people. Toqaev initiated the bill amid an outcry by human rights groups about a rise in domestic violence in the Central Asian nation. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Kazakh Service, click here.

Jailed Kyrgyz Rights Defender Anvar Sartaev Transferred To House Arrest

Bishkek City Court (file photo)
Bishkek City Court (file photo)

The Bishkek City Court ruled to transfer to house arrest rights defender Anvar Sartaev, who was detained earlier on charges of calling for mass unrest, violent acts against citizens, and disobedience to the orders of authorities. On February 1, a lower court sent Sartaev to a pretrial detention center until at least April 1. It remains unknown what the charges stem from. Sartaev is known for his activities monitoring the rights of current and former military personnel. He unsuccessfully tried to get elected to the post of the country's ombudsman in 2015 and took part in parliamentary elections in 2017. To read the original story by RFE/RL's Kyrgyz Service, click here.

Britain Slaps Sanctions On Chiefs Of Arctic Prison Where Navalny Died

Britain's Foreign Secretary David Cameron
Britain's Foreign Secretary David Cameron

Britain on February 21 sanctioned six individuals running the Russian Arctic prison where the death of Kremlin opponent Aleksei Navalny was announced on February 16. Those sanctioned -- the camp's head, Colonel Vadim Kalinin, and his five deputies -- will be banned from Britain and have their assets frozen, the Foreign Office said. "Navalny suffered from being denied medical treatment, as well as having to walk in [minus] 32 [degree Celsius] weather while being held in the prison," the statement said. "Those responsible for Navalny’s brutal treatment should be under no illusion -- we will hold them accountable," Foreign Secretary David Cameron said.

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